Dsr factors

I just learned a little about - DSR Factors in nvidea's control panel. I was looking in the 3d settings and was curious what it was for. I google it and followed some recommended settings for it and all I can say is wow! This is the best tweak ever. I set it 2.25 factor with 10% smoothness and I can't believe how good it looks on my dell S3220dgf monitor. And I think I still can improve it with more adjustments.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,792   +2,065
Staff member
It's basically good old fashioned supersampling anti-aliasing, where the 3D scene is rendered at a higher resolution than what the monitor is set to. The 'factors' setting controls the relative scale of the rendered image to the display one (e.g. 2.25x with a 1920 x 1080 monitor means it's rendering at 2880 x 1620); the smoothness setting controls how the higher resolution picture is scaled back down to monitor resolution (it looks like it's adjusting either the number of samples taken and/or the amount that each sample contributes to the final blend, or may be even just the value of the standard deviation used in the Gaussian filter).

For older games or those that aren't graphically demanding (either because one's graphics card is really powerful or the game itself doesn't use complex graphics), it's a great way of getting better visuals. There isn't one setting that suits every game and everyone's tastes, so it can always be improved by tweaking the two settings. In the Program Settings tab in the Nvidia Control Panel, you can set it up differently for each game you want to use it in.
 
It's basically good old fashioned supersampling anti-aliasing, where the 3D scene is rendered at a higher resolution than what the monitor is set to. The 'factors' setting controls the relative scale of the rendered image to the display one (e.g. 2.25x with a 1920 x 1080 monitor means it's rendering at 2880 x 1620); the smoothness setting controls how the higher resolution picture is scaled back down to monitor resolution (it looks like it's adjusting either the number of samples taken and/or the amount that each sample contributes to the final blend, or may be even just the value of the standard deviation used in the Gaussian filter).

For older games or those that aren't graphically demanding (either because one's graphics card is really powerful or the game itself doesn't use complex graphics), it's a great way of getting better visuals. There isn't one setting that suits every game and everyone's tastes, so it can always be improved by tweaking the two settings. In the Program Settings tab in the Nvidia Control Panel, you can set it up differently for each game you want to use it in.
I see what you mean about a single setting not suiting every game the same, but I was astonished what a difference it made. I recently tweaked my ram from the advertised speed of 3200Hz to 3600Hz and did not notice much of a difference except for using benchmark software. I was lucky enough to get a hold of a Geforce RTX 3070 without getting scalped a couple of months ago and can set the games at full quality without losing performance. I've been playing alot of ESO lately and have it set at DSR Factor 3.00x, 10% smoothness and it's like I bought a new monitor. Are you saying that I could pre program the settings for different games?
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,792   +2,065
Staff member
My mistake, the ability to set up different levels of DSR in various games isn't in the Control Panel (although you can configure other settings per game there). It's in the GeForce Experience app but only for those games that Nvidia has configured it for; so you might find that none of the games you have are listed.