FCC to vote on rules mandating mobile carriers authenticate calls

Cal Jeffrey

Posts: 3,116   +862
Staff member

In 2018, the FCC wanted cellular providers to have the SHAKEN/STIR protocol implemented by the end of 2019. Many carriers, including AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, and Comcast, already have the framework set up. However, spammed calls are still a problem.

Last February, Pai promised "regulatory intervention" if telecoms did not combat the nuisance calls by 2020. The new rules seem to be an attempt to make right on that promise.

"It's clear that FCC action is needed to spur across-the-board deployment of this important technology," said Pai in the FCC announcement. "There is no silver bullet when it comes to eradicating robocalls, but this is a critical shot at the target."

The new rules would mandate mobile providers to set up the call authentication network, where previously it was only strongly encouraged. The Commission already passed regulations last June that allow carriers to block spoofed numbers by default.

However, it's not all up to cellular companies. In October, we reported that while the SHAKEN/STIR framework has already been implemented with some providers, some phone manufacturers like Apple have failed to update their devices to identify the signal sent by the protocol in a meaningful way.

While iOS 13 can receive the SHAKEN/STIR signal, it does not display a message indicating the call may be spam. Apple's workaround is to "silence unknown callers." However, this is not practical in situations where you may get an urgent call from an unknown number, like your child's school.

A better solution is to use a spam filter like AT&T's Call Protect app. It is far from perfect, but better than ignoring every unknown call.

The FCC is expected to vote on the newly proposed rules later this month.

Permalink to story.

 

EClyde

Posts: 2,404   +947
They make money off those calls why would they prevent them? Sanders would put a stop to it. He would make sure I got my fair share of that revenue
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,144   +6,895
The boy is finally catching on .... this could be his one crowning moment during his tenure in this job.
 

PEnnn

Posts: 635   +617
"Last February, Pai promised "regulatory intervention" if telecoms did not combat the nuisance calls by 2020. The new rules seem to be an attempt to make right on that promise"

OK, one year later and nothing happened so far. It seems, Pai the weasel is still negotiating his next job with a big telco when he and his orange boss are kicked out.
 

deemon

Posts: 316   +100
What kind of nonsense is this article spreading... ignoring all unknown calls is the best!
 

psycros

Posts: 3,554   +4,322
I don't understand how these people spoof the caller ID data to begin with. Shouldn't that data be inserted by the telco's system? And if that's the case then how is the origin point overriding it?
 

GNelson

Posts: 16   +23
Since all Calls, today are IP based it is easy to Spoof with very little in hardware. They should simply add the IP packet in calls and the pingback the IP and if the range is not in the phone number range of use block the IP and the Number. Yes this would require the Telco Switch is do some lifting but when you are talking MILLIONS of people already paying taxes in for the 911 and INFO services it is already being paid for. Come on GEEKS this is easy stuff why isn't it already being used? Oh I know they as others have said MONEY it makes them look like a hero when they do something and we all get on the bus and allow it.
 

lipe123

Posts: 972   +560
Had a furious guy call me 15 times in a meeting because "I" called him saying there is a warrant out for his arrest because he didn't pay his taxes.

This BS needs to stop NOW! How can it be so easy to spoof someone else's number?!
 

treetops

Posts: 3,064   +784
Had a furious guy call me 15 times in a meeting because "I" called him saying there is a warrant out for his arrest because he didn't pay his taxes.

This BS needs to stop NOW! How can it be so easy to spoof someone else's number?!
Legal survey call centers have been doing it for at least 15 years, to make it look like you're getting a call from your area code. It's not illegal(that I know of) anyone can do it with a simple google search.