First US road that charges electric vehicles while they drive will be ready next year

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TheRealSCDC

Posts: 194   +290
Ok Cap no more. So here is my take. It's not being built to be cost-effective. It's not expected to make sense, and it's not expected to save the world.
It's one freaking mile long! It's a project to test out the tech currently available.
They will learn from this and the aim is to perfect it. Early humans left the trees to explore a few million years ago and have been moving forward ever since.

Playing it safe is for wusses.
Scav,
This is a clear aim at spending a LOT of money to line someone's pocket. This makes absolutely no sense to even consider this in a country the size of the USA. On projects like this that serve no useful purpose, just follow the money trail to see who is benefiting.

Makes more sense to work on fuel economy of fossil fuel burning engines and keep vehicles affordable. I cannot afford a hybrid or electric vehicle. I do not feel like having a second house payment. Add the increase in costs of electricity due to the increasing demand on the grid to charge these things, and with the technology we have to work with, PASS.

I don't even like Cap's idea because it's catering to the less than 1% who even own electric vehicles. (I'm probably pretty close). The most I've paid for a car in the past 10 years is 19k. I don't buy new and always go 4 years old. Let the original owner eat the depreciation.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,645   +2,858
TechSpot Elite
Scav,
This is a clear aim at spending a LOT of money to line someone's pocket. This makes absolutely no sense to even consider this in a country the size of the USA. On projects like this that serve no useful purpose, just follow the money trail to see who is benefiting.
It's not that I disagree. But I don't think much gets done here until the proper pockets are lined, regardless of the purpose or politics behind it.

I think where we disagree is that I think what we can learn from this one mile road is invaluable.
Makes more sense to work on fuel economy of fossil fuel burning engines and keep vehicles affordable.
Ok, another thing we disagree on :D. I believe investment in smokers is not going to mean a thing anymore. Not because I think they are doomed, but because their days as the popular choice are numbered.
it's catering to the less than 1% who even own electric vehicles.
It has actually climbed to 4-5%, but the key is that 55% of Americans say they will buy an EV, and it's higher in other countries.

We are in for even higher gas prices, and soon. And the reasons are the same. Just recently, Saudi Arabia raised their prices again. A lot.


An EV and a hybrid are a way to fight back.

If you don't mind an even longer post, I just wanted to mention that over a year ago now I decided that my next car and my work truck would be an EV (though now one will probably be a Hybrid) so I bought a 2017 Focus EV. Just to live with one for a while, and I'm serious, once you drive an electric you will be hooked.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,623   +1,621
We are in for even higher gas prices, and soon....An EV and a hybrid are a way to fight back.
Only if a small number of people buy them. If most of America does, then we'll have electricity shortages and skyrocketing prices in place of gas -- despite what groups like the NRDC claim, there isn't enough spare generating capacity in the US to charge a nationwide fleet of EVs. And of course, 40% of the electricity in the nation is generated with natural gas, a fossil fuel that's seeing larger price hikes than oil.
 

Karlos95

Posts: 271   +188
I like sarcasm, when done correctly. :)
oh-really-do-cbffsw.jpg
 

Karlos95

Posts: 271   +188
Only if a small number of people buy them. If most of America does, then we'll have electricity shortages and skyrocketing prices in place of gas -- despite what groups like the NRDC claim, there isn't enough spare generating capacity in the US to charge a nationwide fleet of EVs. And of course, 40% of the electricity in the nation is generated with natural gas, a fossil fuel that's seeing larger price hikes than oil.
Make people buy solar panels and a battery to charge up if they want a tesla. Sure, won't work for those who want to travel long distances. But if you live within 30mins of work then you'll be fine.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,796   +7,723
I don't even like Cap's idea because it's catering to the less than 1% who even own electric vehicles. (I'm probably pretty close). The most I've paid for a car in the past 10 years is 19k. I don't buy new and always go 4 years old. Let the original owner eat the depreciation.
My, "wire the highways" idea, was strictly aimed at the trucking industry, and only at major highways (Rt 1, RT 66, and the like).Sections of wired roads would allow cross country with electric rigs. Perhaps even relay runs where you change drivers, but the truck continues on..The best you have now is maybe 500 miles, then uncouple the trailer and put the tractor on charge, another tractor, another 500 miles, rinse and repeat..

Highways have to have a minimum of 6 inches of concrete, and the coils would have to be buried under that. Field density decreases too rapidly to make them practical.

TV stations put out 1,000,000 watts. Think about how close you can get to the antennas without getting RF burns. The same principles and physics are well in play here.

Philly, (I, think), still runs "trolley buses", with a dual wire overhead feed..

To the opposite POV, the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Line still ran PRR K-4 "Pacifics", unto Wildwood and Cape May because they couldn't afford to pull overhead wires down to the Jersey shore. After the steamers were retired, (late 50's), they ran self propelled "Budd cars" (Diesel electric), on those routes.

I still remember fondly, getting blasted out of bed at 7:00 AM, when one of those big, black, smoky monsters, came chugging down New Jersey avenue.!

This is a SEPTA "trackless trolley" circa 2011 (Everyone else in the world apparently calls them "trolley buses".
Philadelphia_E40LFR_trolleybus_817.jpg


 
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Endymio

Posts: 1,623   +1,621
TV stations put out 1,000,000 watts. Think about how close you can get to the antennas without getting RF burns. The same principles and physics are well in play here.
RF EM waves aren't absorbed by human tissue. A DC electric current, however, is. Of course, you *could* charge EVs inductively with RF energy .... if you don't mind wasting 90%+ of your energy in inductive losses.

That isn't to say the safety issues aren't insurmountable. But don't pretend they don't exist.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,796   +7,723
RF EM waves aren't absorbed by human tissue. A DC electric current, however, is. Of course, you *could* charge EVs inductively with RF energy .... if you don't mind wasting 90%+ of your energy in inductive losses.
Thus has been my point all along. Wireless charging us simply too lossy, no matter how it's done.

CRT TVs used to use what was known as a "Flyback transformer", to step up the voltage to the guns. It operated at audio frequencies (15.7 Khz). When you got hit by one of those, it didn't go through you, but rather burned you on the outside.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,645   +2,858
TechSpot Elite
Only if a small number of people buy them. If most of America does, then we'll have electricity shortages and skyrocketing prices in place of gas -- despite what groups like the NRDC claim, there isn't enough spare generating capacity in the US to charge a nationwide fleet of EVs. And of course, 40% of the electricity in the nation is generated with natural gas, a fossil fuel that's seeing larger price hikes than oil.
The entire NRDC report is very long, but it is explained well and there is no "despite". Total generation capability of the US is sufficient for EV saturation up to 75-80%. It explains a quite inexpensive method of grid interconnects, so grid strain in one part of the country can be boosted from anywhere else where the load is lighter. And it explains that Canada wants in on that too. If Mexico follows, we could have a "North American" power grid.

Its beauty is in its simplicity.

If you read the NRDC report you know that Europe did it but for everyone not familiar:

And Forbes explains why it all works:

And of course, 40% of the electricity in the nation is generated with natural gas
And when the time comes, those will go the way of Coal and Oil. As NG gained in popularity, the Coal and Oil plants dropped steadily, and the difference in air quality in those areas was astounding.

I linked this article because it's from my home state.:)
Sources and studies are linked in the article.

EDIT
To fix the percentages
 
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TheRealSCDC

Posts: 194   +290
The entire NRDC report is very long, but it is explained well and there is no "despite". Total generation capability of the US is sufficient for EV saturation up 70-80%. It explains a quite inexpensive method of grid interconnects, so grid strain in one part of the country can be boosted from anywhere else where the load is lighter. And it explains that Canada wants in on that too. If Mexico follows, we could have a "North American" power grid.

Its beauty is in its simplicity.
That’s what she said. When it‘s too small, get someone else to fill the gap. :joy:
 
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