Ford shows off all-electric F-150 Lightning pickup for police use

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,332   +163
Staff member
In a nutshell: Ford has launched its first electric pickup truck for police forces. The 2023 Ford F-150 Lightning Pro Special Service Vehicle (SSV) features a variety of upgrades over a standard consumer F-150 Lightning including heavy-duty cloth seats with reduced bolsters to make it easier for officers to enter and exit the vehicle, built-in steel intrusion plates in the front seatbacks, easy-to-clean vinyl rear seats and flooring and available roof-mounted LED beacons.

They'll come pre-configured to seamlessly connect to a department's existing fleet of internal combustion and battery-electric vehicles, chargers and fleet management software. This should allow departments to proactively manage when vehicles are charged and serviced to reduce operating costs and improve uptime.

Ford is targeting 452 horsepower, 775 lb.-ft. of torque and a 7,700-pound towing capacity with the standard-range battery option. When equipped with the available extended-range battery and max trailer tow package, the Pro SSV will put out 580 horsepower and 775 lb.-ft. of torque with a sub-four-second 0-60 mph acceleration rating and a 10,000-pound towing capacity. This will allow departments to tow heavy items like trailers or boats with ease.

The front trunk (where the engine would normally reside) is now a 14.1 cubic foot lockable cargo area to carry extra supplies like first-aid kits, ratchet straps and presumably, high-powered weapons.

The truck will also come equipped with a 220A DC-DC converter to support computers, radios, lights and so on. Pro Power Onboard outlets supply additional power to accessories as needed, as do the integrated USB ports.

Other standard equipment includes a 12-inch digital cluster screen, a 12-inch landscape-style touchscreen and a reinforced instrument panel top tray for mounting police equipment.

Ford Pro customers include more than 12,000 police departments across the country. Indeed, Ford has a long history in supplying vehicles for police use with the legendary Crown Victoria perhaps being the most prevalent.

Ford said it will release more information on the 2023 F-150 Lightning including range estimates later this summer. No word yet regarding potential availability or pricing.

Permalink to story.

 

Arbie

Posts: 397   +709
I wonder how often, statistically, US police officers wish that their vehicle could tow a boat. Or even a big trailer. Or how often they need 0-60 in 4-sec. Or how often they need 450hp at all. Maybe a real officer can tell us.
 

Irata

Posts: 2,194   +3,787
They should send some of those to Germany. I hear the Germans have an abundance of electricity.
Absolutely. Our most capable government (doesn‘t matter which parties are in power) who previously pushed industry and consumers to Russian gas (environmentally friendly) has also decided to phase out coal and nuclear power plus supported the EU‘s decision to ban ICE engines by 2035.
That‘s totally understandable since there aren‘t any car manufacturers in Germany so it‘s not like a very large number of jobs depend on it.
 

Hexic

Posts: 1,245   +1,952
TechSpot Elite
I wonder how often, statistically, US police officers wish that their vehicle could tow a boat. Or even a big trailer. Or how often they need 0-60 in 4-sec. Or how often they need 450hp at all. Maybe a real officer can tell us.

I can tell you as someone who has years of experience contracting with various departments and agencies for training & tactics that it depends on the use-case.

More rural departments (typically the county, state troopers, and/or DNR) very much use trucks that may need to haul either boats (I.e. water rescue), be able to have all sorts of junk thrown in the bed (anything from gear, to random crap out in BFE, to kitted up ERTs). The terrain that trucks are also able to handle in said parts is also a huge plus. Explorers and your typical Impala don't handle off-road as well as a truck could in some situations.

Having a truck that can go that fast is very helpful - if your job is to run traffic and you don't have a vehicle that can not only top out at the upper levels for pursuits, but actually catch up if you're static & running radar - you're ineffective.

The only hope here is that they give the departments enough of the discount to make it worth it. The explorers that alot of departments have transitioned to now aren't the worst things they could have adopted. Price, durability and mileage are king. If they can't beat this thing up like they do to their usual squads, it won't take.
 
Last edited:
Amazing how much resistance against EVs I read on a tech website, like new technology is supposed to work 100% efficient right off the start. you just sound like those people who wont give up your horse wagon for an automobile back then.

well I guess most people here are smart but cannot think or imagine outside the box.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,530   +5,967
Amazing how much resistance against EVs I read on a tech website, like new technology is supposed to work 100% efficient right off the start. you just sound like those people who wont give up your horse wagon for an automobile back then.

well I guess most people here are smart but cannot think or imagine outside the box.
It's amazing how people will meatshield EVS despite their very obvious problems still nto being resolved.

Also for the record: EVs are nearly as old as ICEs. The first model T was EV. They've had a LONG time to work on them and still havent resolved the battery issue.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,726   +2,960
TechSpot Elite
If this keeps the same advantages over the smoke version like the F150 Lightning has against the gas version, these will sell well. The advantages of an EV over the smoke pumps for law enforcement are huge. The cost of fuel is only the beginning.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 9,090   +8,126
The old LTD police model was always more than enough for departments and did the job. I wonder if anyone in that department calculated the cost of tires? Since the electric models are nearly half as much heavier, they tend to go through tires quickly and those tires are much higher than the standard truck model because of the battery weight.

I'm all for electrified vehicles but I'm more in favor of intelligent civil servants that use good common sense and put away the bling bling for publicly purchased items of any kind.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,726   +2,960
TechSpot Elite
Since the electric models are nearly half as much heavier,
Sheesh dude, don't make it worse than it already is. :D
The F150 Lightning is around 1200 lbs heavier.



And on average, EV tires will wear about 25% faster on the largest vehicles.
It's a good trade-off really when just comparing fuel costs.


"With a 100 kWh battery on the Model S at $0.14 per kWh, plus the 15% additional energy required due to inefficiency, it will cost approximately $16.47 to fully charge your Model S from 0-100%. Realistically, it should be less than that, depending on your starting battery life.
Now, the Model S long range has an EPA estimated range of 405 miles, which means you’d be paying about $0.041 per mile or $4.07 for 100 miles of range."
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,961   +7,006
Also for the record: EVs are nearly as old as ICEs. The first model T was EV. They've had a LONG time to work on them and still havent resolved the battery issue.
EVs were abandoned around the time that you are speaking of. There was no financial reason to continue research into battery development at that point. Had EVs not been abandoned at that time, you can bet that battery R&D would have continued, and we would be substantially farther along in battery development than we are now. At that time, I've heard that the main reason that EVs were abandoned was the fact that there was no easy way to charge them as the electric grid did not exist in any way, shape, or form comparable to what exists now.

Feel free, though, to continue to point out that there are still problems with EVs at this moment in time. Besides the fact that there is now a well-enough developed electric grid to charge them, there are also countless people who know that there are problems and are looking for ways to solve them. Some of them are not that far off - for instance, solid electrolyte batteries.
https://www.anl.gov/article/scientists-discover-new-electrolyte-for-solidstate-lithiumion-batteries
https://media.ford.com/content/ford...03/ford-boosts-investment-in-solid-power.html
https://www.bmwblog.com/2022/06/07/bmw-ford-solid-state-batteries/
As examples of just a couple of the research initiatives.
The problems will be solved in time.
 

Hodor

Posts: 113   +67
Also for the record: EVs are nearly as old as ICEs. The first model T was EV. They've had a LONG time to work on them and still havent resolved the battery issue.

Exactly so. In 1899 New York had a fleet of 500 electric taxis. But just 2 years later gasoline taxis took over, because of their much longer range and faster refueling.

123 years later....... still the same problem. A bit closer to the solution, but still not good enough.

I suggest adding a small nuclear reactor. That would pump up the range.
 

azicat

Posts: 132   +150
I can tell you as someone who has years of experience contracting with various departments and agencies for training & tactics that it depends on the use-case.
An informed opinion on Techspot? Heavens to murgatroyd! ;)

I do wonder about the different types of total-service-life agreements that civil services make with vehicle suppliers, considering the mega mileages that they can rack up. Police forces here in AU recently had to move to imports to replace locally-produced Holdens and Fords. Various machines of dubious reliability reputation are now doing highway patrol, such as Chrysler 300Cs and BMW 5-series. Camry hybrids have a rated 100000 mile battery endurance, so I wonder how often they'd have to budget for battery packs in these F150s.

Edit: Camry hybrid batteries are warrantied for 100000 miles (give or take), but claimed to last "up to" 300000 miles.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,726   +2,960
TechSpot Elite
Exactly so. In 1899 New York had a fleet of 500 electric taxis. But just 2 years later gasoline taxis took over, because of their much longer range and faster refueling.
You really should read this:

Camry hybrids have a rated 100000 mile battery endurance
Gonna have to say, wrong. Who rated their battery at 100000 miles? I'm asking because Toyota offers a 150000-mile warranty on it:

And their lifespan?

"The Toyota Master Diagnostic Technician I interviewed for my story felt most Hybrid batteries will last at least 180,000 to 200,000 miles. Plus, he mentioned that replacement cost is getting cheaper as time goes by."

It's amazing how people will meatshield EVS despite their very obvious problems still nto being resolved.
Well why don't you list those problems instead of doing a hit-and-run.
 
Last edited: