Lian Li's new V3000 Plus can hold two PCs and four watercooling radiators

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,576   +174
Staff member
Why it matters: Premium PC case maker Lian Li has been teasing its massive V3000 Plus chassis since 2021, and it is finally almost ready to ship. The V3000 Plus is a full-tower chassis with an all-aluminum exterior (steel interior) and virtually every bell and whistle you can think of. Lian Li designed the case for use in one of three configurations: standard to accommodate a typical machine with large hardware, rotated to give your GPU access to direct airflow and dual system mode for those interested in accommodating two separate builds in a single chassis.

In dual mode, system one can utilize up to an E-ATX or EBB motherboard while the second system can use up to a mini-ITX board. The chassis can accommodate two power supplies and further features individual front panel controls for each system. The motherboard tray is removable to make core hardware installation and cable management less of a hassle.

Lian Li's case can support up to 16 fans as well as three 480mm radiators and a 360mm radiator. There are also two reservoir plates, enough space for up to 16 SSDs (four tool-free trays) or eight SSDs and eight HDDs, integrated Velcro straps for cable management, dual push-pull tempered glass side panels and addressable RGB lighting. Both tempered glass panels are 4mm thick and tinted, although the right panel is darker to better help hide unsightly cables.

The Lian Li V3000 Plus measures (D) 678.5mm x (W) 279mm x (H) 674mm. It is not quite the largest case we have ever seen (the legacy Cooler Master Cosmos II is barely wider and taller, for example), but it is still massive in its own right. There is plenty of room for the latest GPUs from AMD and Nvidia as well as massive CPU coolers like those offered by Noctua and others.

Newegg has the Lian Li V3000 Plus available to pre-order priced at $499.99 with an anticipated release date of December 10 and comes backed by a one-year warranty.

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hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,723   +2,690
No one does it like Lian Li. The build in the second image looks amazing.

This one is too big for what I need, but they've convinced me to buy two cases from them over the years with no regrets.
 

PEnnn

Posts: 1,010   +1,361
Why do companies create such monstrosities that maybe 0.0001 % of their customers would have any need for???

Is it really worth it?? How many they think will sell??
 
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Ojref

Posts: 43   +51
Why do companies create such monstrosities that maybe 0.0001 % of their customers would have any need for???

Is it really worth it?? How many to they think will sell??
Someone has to. One could do a simple multibox, or have a Linux instance.. Mac clone instance. Rendering station with the secondary to use for other things while the primary workstation encodes or renders. It's great.
 

Fastturtle

Posts: 106   +52
This competes with the Corsair Obsidian 1000D that's currently out of stock. Now if it included enough 3.5/2.5 drive bays, I'd be interested in it simply as it would be a better itteration of the Obsidian case.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,287   +8,433
Why do companies create such monstrosities that maybe 0.0001 % of their customers would have any need for???
For the same reasons car companies build top of the line luxury cars and form racing teams, so they can sell more low end models.

As an example, why does Chevrolet build Corvettes? So they can sell more Chevettes. (I was going to say "Vegas", but it didn't rhyme, and they were abominable turds, worst cars ever).

I will say, the concept of having spaces for two PSUs, is an idea whose time has come. For that you more than likely need a full tower, just one not as extravagant as this.

Besides, after paying $1600 for your GTX-4090, most people likely won't be able to afford this case anyway.

But, "fry my wires", that's one helluva conversation piece.
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