Lytro drastically improves the light-field camera with $1,599 Illum

Scorpus

Posts: 2,007   +231
Staff member
It's hard to describe Lytro's first commercially available light-field camera a 'hit'. The technology packed into the strange rectangular prism piece of hardware, which allowed you to fully refocus photos after they're captured, was certainly cool, but the image quality...

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G

Guest

What kind of zoom can it do? It says it's got zoom lens, but no mention of magnification.
 

CJ100570

Posts: 18   +1
Looks interesting. I may snag one since the price isn't too high.
I clearly saw a price tag of $1600. You may consider it 'not too high' for a non professional experimental camera but I'm afraid you'll be part of the minority.

I must be part of the minority then. $1600 isn't a big investment for me in the grand scheme of things. The 9k I spent on the 1D C was though. But then again, I'm worth it and can afford it.
 
G

Guest

Unfortunately this article neglects to mention this camera's amazing capabilities: it can adjust the perspective, depth of field, and focus of a picture AFTER it's been captured. That means you can screw up a photo and then fix it to look utterly professional in post processing. With "normal" DSLRs, if you screw up a shot, you can tweak it slightly with RAW format, but not much. This camera lets you change the actual photo. That's unheard of. It can also create tilt-shift effects and other unique things that don't require separate lenses worth thousands of dollars.

It's unlike anything on the market. $1600 is a steal for this.

And for the record, I'm not some Lytro employee/booster. I'm simply a tech geek with a love of photography and tech toys. This thing is exciting, but I doubt I can convince my wife to let me drop the money, sadly.
 

Docus

Posts: 25   +12
Interesting... I'm glad they had the capital to pursue a second opportunity with this technology, considering their first design was so utterly weird. It looked like a kaleidoscope.