Sigma's itsy-bitsy full-frame mirrorless camera is available to pre-order from $1,899

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

The Sigma fp is available to pre-order from today priced at $1,899 for the body only from retailers such as Adorama and B&H Photo. You can also bundle it with the Sigma 45mm f/2.8 DG DN Contemporary lens for $2,199 out the door. It ships on October 25.

With the Sigma fp, the Japanese photography company has essentially stuffed the guts of a full-frame mirrorless shooter inside the body of a point-and-shoot camera. Buyers will get a 24.6-megapixel Bayer full-frame sensor in a chassis that measures 112.6 millimeters (4.43 inches) x 69.9 millimeters (2.75 inches) x 45.3 millimeters (1.78 inches) and weighs just 370 grams (13.05 ounces).

Sigma has done away with the mechanical shutter entirely, relying only on an electronic variant. This has its benefits as photogs won’t have to contend with added noise and shutter shock. By eliminating a moving part, you’re also potentially extending the life of the camera (that’s one less thing that could wear out and break over time).

The Sigma fp is also dust and splash proof and uses the L-mount, making it compatible with not only Sigma lenses but those from other companies including Leica and Panasonic.

It's a compelling camera at an intriguing price point and personally, I can't wait to see what people do with it.

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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Well it is impressive but 24.6-megapixel just isn't all that great when we have 30+mp's out there and a few 50mp's as well ..... but the size will set it's own standards ....
 

yRaz

Nigerian Prince
Well it is impressive but 24.6-megapixel just isn't all that great when we have 30+mp's out there and a few 50mp's as well ..... but the size will set it's own standards ....
It's been my experience that lower pixel density on a sensor results in better low light photography. Considering that mirrorless cameras don't have and optical view finder like DSLRs, taking photos at night can be quite challenging.

That being said, my Sony a6000 is the best camera I've ever owned dispite all it's flaws
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Well it is impressive but 24.6-megapixel just isn't all that great when we have 30+mp's out there and a few 50mp's as well ..... but the size will set it's own standards ....
24 megapixel is actually pretty much standard for APS-C sensors.. Nikon chose to drop from 24.6 to 20. something, going from their D-7200 to D-7500 "pro-sumer" DSLRs. Part of the move was to up the framing rate to 8 FPS, and likely to enable 4K video capability in the D-7500 as well.

While 24 MP may not seem like a lot, you should get a lot less noise with a full frame 24 MPs sensor than with the same resolution in the APS-C format.

Petre Hegre uses a 140 MP medium format camera for his studio "erotic art" photography. In landscape orientation, the baseline is 14,400 pixels (or thereabouts). He's a great technician, but his studio work is endlessly boring. Same white no-seam paper, same high key lighting, year after year, yawn.

Nowadays the trick is really in the lenses, and in the artist's imagination. Photoshop will give you all the up-res and sharpening you need for most situations
 

p51d007

TS Evangelist
Well it is impressive but 24.6-megapixel just isn't all that great when we have 30+mp's out there and a few 50mp's as well ..... but the size will set it's own standards ....
More isn't typically better when it comes to photography...Even though the sensors are a bit larger, stuffing that many, is only "really" beneficial if you are going to zoom/crop on post processing. The "more is better" argument is usually lost, especially in lower light photography, as the increase in the noise level is apparent. If you shoot in "full auto" the processing software will probably try to knock the noise down, resulting in a "flat" photo.

I've used film & DSLR's for over 30 years, the past 11 with DSLR's. Although I like the mirrorless idea, I'm not jumping on the band wagon because I like to take lower light or night time photos and with the "tv camera" view finder, it can be challenging to see what you are shooting.
 
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yRaz

Nigerian Prince
I've used film & DSLR's for over 30 years, the past 11 with DSLR's. Although I like the mirrorless idea, I'm not jumping on the band wagon because I like to take lower light or night time photos and with the "tv camera" view finder, it can be challenging to see what you are shooting.
Yes, it is challenging to take low light photos. While I still can take great low light photos, the weekends really is in the digital view finder. It's doable but it takes a lot of practice and you REALLY have to know your cameras personality