TeamGroup builds "ultra-durable" NVMe SSDs designed for Chia mining

midian182

Posts: 6,794   +61
Staff member
In context: Seeing as there are graphics cards designed specifically for mining cryptocurrency, the inevitable has happened: a company has introduced an SSD with an incredible endurance level, pitching it as the perfect solution for mining storage-based Chia crypto.

We've been warned of potential storage shortages and price hikes as a result of Chia, which uses a proof of space and time model that allows miners to farm/earn the currency by allocating their unused disk space. Adata says it has prompted a 500% increase in its SSD sales, while Galax says that mining Chia will void its SSDs' warranties.

Potentially helping the situation is T-Create, a sub-brand of TeamGroup, which is pitching its new T-Create Expert PCIe SSD as the perfect option for Chia miners, thanks to its endurance level of up to 12,000 TBW (terabytes written). The company notes that this is 3 to 10 times more durability than its MP33 and QX SSD lines and will "eliminating the hassle of constantly replacing SSDs and providing more valuable time to mine cryptocurrency!"

The M.2 NVMe T-Create Expert SSD offers up to 3,400MB/s read and up to 3,000MB/s write speeds, which is faster than many PCIe 3.0 drives we've tested. It also features a Silicon Motion SM2262ENG controller paired with 64-layer 3D TLC flash from Micron.

The SSD comes in 2TB (12,000 TBW) and 1TB (6,000 TBW) capacities and features the industry's first 12-year ultra-long term warranty. Given that it is targeting Chia miners, one assumes crypto mining won't void this guarantee à la Galax.

According to TechPowerUp's review, the 2TB SSD is priced at $800 while the 1TB version is $400. That works out at a less-than-generous 40 cents per GB for the former model. They're available to pre-order now, though the website doesn't make them easy to find.

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TheBigFatClown

Posts: 916   +357
It's an interesting article. My question is how the company is achieving the gift of creating and offering an SSD that is "3 to 10x more durable". 3x more durable than your average SSD would be amazing and yet they have the technology to offer 10x more durability? Is it a new technology? How is it being done technologically?
 

paul1122

Posts: 102   +75
It's an interesting article. My question is how the company is achieving the gift of creating and offering an SSD that is "3 to 10x more durable". 3x more durable than your average SSD would be amazing and yet they have the technology to offer 10x more durability? Is it a new technology? How is it being done technologically?

I'm guessing they could make one 100X more durable, but it all comes down to how many dollars per year they get from you. Cheap drive = replace more often. High price drive = drive away consumers. Wherever the current sweet spot is, that's where you'll find the associated durability factor.
 

TheBigFatClown

Posts: 916   +357
I'm guessing they could make one 100X more durable, but it all comes down to how many dollars per year they get from you. Cheap drive = replace more often. High price drive = drive away consumers. Wherever the current sweet spot is, that's where you'll find the associated durability factor.
Well, yes, I get what you're saying but my point was asking whether or not this 3 to 10x extra durability is achieved through some kind of technological breakthrough. Or, are they just adding more flash chips that use a wear-leveling algorithm?
My guess is the latter. 10x the chips equates to 10x the durability in my simple mind. So, they're probably not ahead of anybody else from a technological standpoint.
You're basically, in essence (am I repeating myself) buying 10 SSDs at the same time in a single package. Something along those lines. If someone has a better theory feel free to share it.
Thanks!
 

CrisisDog

Posts: 240   +135
It's an interesting article. My question is how the company is achieving the gift of creating and offering an SSD that is "3 to 10x more durable". 3x more durable than your average SSD would be amazing and yet they have the technology to offer 10x more durability? Is it a new technology? How is it being done technologically?
One way would be to take a higher capacity drive, then under provision the amount of allocated space to the operating system. Let's say a 4 or 8 TB drive, but only 2TB can be used at a time. As blocks wear out, a new one is brought in for use, while the failed is locked out of the usage pool. This would account for the incredibly high price these drives are going for.
 

TheBigFatClown

Posts: 916   +357
One way would be to take a higher capacity drive, then under provision the amount of allocated space to the operating system. Let's say a 4 or 8 TB drive, but only 2TB can be used at a time. As blocks wear out, a new one is brought in for use, while the failed is locked out of the usage pool. This would account for the incredibly high price these drives are going for.
I think you hit the nail on the head. So, it's all just an illusion really. But it's a sensible one I guess.
 

Myflag

Posts: 10   +14
One way would be to take a higher capacity drive, then under provision the amount of allocated space to the operating system. Let's say a 4 or 8 TB drive, but only 2TB can be used at a time. As blocks wear out, a new one is brought in for use, while the failed is locked out of the usage pool. This would account for the incredibly high price these drives are going for.
It is also possible they are using TLC or even MLC flash which has a far higher endurance.