The cheapest Samsung MicroLED TV will reportedly cost $80,000

midian182

Posts: 7,882   +81
Staff member
In context: There’s plenty of exciting new TV technology available today. MicroLED, for example, promises all the benefits of OLED without the drawbacks. Sadly, the biggest problem with the displays is their price; Samsung’s cheapest model starts at $80,000.

It was back at CES 2018 when Samsung unveiled The Wall, a 146-inch modular MicroLED TV aimed at customers with homes as large as their bank balances. A 292-inch, 8K version was unveiled a year later.

Samsung had intended to create a smaller, non-modular MicroLED television in a 70-inch size, but it reportedly dropped those plans to create larger models measuring 89 inches, 101 inches, and 114 inches.

South Korean tech site The Elec now reports that Samsung has set the price for the cheapest, 89-inch model at $80,000. If that isn’t enough screen real estate to cover your mansion’s wall, the 114-inch TV will set you back $100,000. Pricing for the 101-inch model has yet to be decided.

While those prices put the TVs out of reach for most people, they’re still cheaper than the 110-inch MicroLED TV Samsung launched last year, which cost around $141,000. The price drop is because that television uses printed circuit boards, while the 2022 versions use advanced low-temperature polycrystalline silicon [LTPS] thin-film transistors [TFT] that are cheaper to manufacture.

MicroLED technology, which uses micrometer-sized LED lights, is self-illuminating like OLED, producing light and color from its own pixel structures to offer perfect blacks and amazing contrast. As it’s inorganic, it lasts longer than OLED TVs and there’s little to no danger of burn-in.

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Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
Well, the technology is still exciting... I remember when the first plasma TVs came out and they cost north of $20,000.... but prices always drop as technology matures... in a few years, these TVs will hopefully cost far less - and probably be even better!
 

Nintenboy01

Posts: 217   +174
This seems to be the closest to a "perfect" TV tech with none of OLED's flaws. Hopefully 50 to 65 inch 4K versions priced around $3-4k max come in the next few years.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
OLED has no flaws that have not been resolved by now. OLED is by far superior tech.
They may not have "flaws"... but they aren't exactly perfect either... I will embrace any tech that gives me a better picture, larger size, and comparable price (which hopefully comes eventually)...
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,694   +6,633
That said, I don't believe mLED tvs will won't have burn in problems
I agree. mLED also has superior brightness levels. OLED tech, is, however, continually improving.

I'll just echo what others have said, and that these prices are not unexpected for first generation tech like this. Eventually, the prices will drop to where OLEDs are now.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
I agree. mLED also has superior brightness levels. OLED tech, is, however, continually improving.

I'll just echo what others have said, and that these prices are not unexpected for first generation tech like this. Eventually, the prices will drop to where OLEDs are now.
My hope would be that mLED would continually improve too... I'd love to have a 110" kickass screen in my basement for less than 10k...which might become a reality in a decade or so (which will be around the time my current 85" QLED needs replacing)... or maybe even a 300" one :)
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,360   +5,586
OLED has no flaws that have not been resolved by now. OLED is by far superior tech.
OLED burn in hasnt been resolved. Oh sure, they work great, for 2-4 years. Get back to me when they can manage 15 years without failed image quality like LCD and LED panels can do.

OLED is an expensive meme tech for TV junkies that gotta have the most exclusive tech.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
OLED burn in hasnt been resolved. Oh sure, they work great, for 2-4 years. Get back to me when they can manage 15 years without failed image quality like LCD and LED panels can do.

OLED is an expensive meme tech for TV junkies that gotta have the most exclusive tech.
Well, the newest OLED tech has only been around a couple of years... so it's impossible to say whether it will last 10-15 years...

But most of the high-end OLED sets SEEM to be able to last for years... obviously we'll know more in a few years...

And there is no question that the image quality of OLED, provided you have a fairly dark room, is superior to any other display tech we have right now.
 

brucek

Posts: 1,124   +1,666
What's up with the modular aspect? I don't know if this was ever real but when I first read about it I was envisioning a pretty small building block, cheap to manufacture, that could be combined in arbitrary quantity to build up to the size desired. I was more excited about that feature than any picture quality upgrade over OLED which to me is already pretty good. I've got lots of devices in my home and I tend to move things around over time, being able to move panels into different configurations of sizes over time would be pretty handy.
 

seeprime

Posts: 676   +885
Wouldn't you pay $899 for every extra inch?
I paid less than that one inch price, of $899, for my first 65 inch LG 4k model on sale at Walmart. I'd love to get a micro-LED TV when the price of a 65 inch drops as low as OLED sets are today. I hope this happens.
 
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bviktor

Posts: 842   +1,260
Samsung could extremely accelerate the affordability by letting go of 8K that no one needs. That would allow for 4 times bigger pixels, so I think it's fairly safe to say it'd push the prices down real hard.
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,400   +5,124
OLED burn in hasnt been resolved. Oh sure, they work great, for 2-4 years. Get back to me when they can manage 15 years without failed image quality like LCD and LED panels can do.

OLED is an expensive meme tech for TV junkies that gotta have the most exclusive tech.
To be fair, if you wanted the best image quality at any cost(longevity included) OLED was and basically is still your only option. I went with a full array QLED because it's on basically 24/7. It's been on basically 24/7 since October 2017.

It's brightness has noticeably dropped but I'm still happy with its performance. I'm fairly certain an OLED would not being performing as well in my use case.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,427   +2,408
I'll wait for the 1080p version (lol) or when 80%+ of all available content is 4K before I move from what I got.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 685   +507
It's been my experience that even if they don't burn in anymore, they start to appear brown with extended use and brightness drops.

That said, I don't believe mLED tvs will won't have burn in problems
You are talking about something you haven't seen, on first generation OLED on who knows what TV model...I follow display industry and the current OLED and even the one in LG C9 TVs would have served you phenomenally well.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,694   +6,633
I paid less than that one inch price, of $899, for my first 65 inch LG 4k model on sale at Walmart. I'd love to get a micro-LED TV when the price of a 65 inch drops as low as OLED sets are today. I hope this happens.
Count on it - just not anytime soon.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 685   +507
Also, Samsung bought truckloads of oled panels from LG this year... I guess it's cheaper to have every pixel be it's own zone without any bleeding or crushing (non-OLED displays have both, + slower pixel response time) than to use separate layers and leds to achieve lesser quality than OLED's, at a much higher price.
But hey, if you want to have to wear sunglasses to watch TV, OLED is not the tech for you.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,694   +6,633
Also, Samsung bought truckloads of oled panels from LG this year... I guess it's cheaper to have every pixel be it's own zone without any bleeding or crushing (non-OLED displays have both, + slower pixel response time) than to use separate layers and leds to achieve lesser quality than OLED's, at a much higher price.
But hey, if you want to have to wear sunglasses to watch TV, OLED is not the tech for you.
If you have to wear sunglasses to watch TV, then, IMO, the TV needs to be calibrated. ;)
 

Ludak021

Posts: 685   +507
If you have to wear sunglasses to watch TV, then, IMO, the TV needs to be calibrated. ;)
Well, I was joking obviously, but having 4000 nits is pretty close. And Samung will add more. Old 120 nits TVs were visible in daylight just fine, but somehow for OLED (<800 nits on the first series) you apparently need to be in a dark room...(no you don't, not even close)