Twitch viewership drops as top streamers jump ship to other platforms

David Matthews

TS Maniac
Staff member

Over the past three months, Twitch has seen its total hours watched fall from 2.6 million to 2.3 million. This is according to a report from Streamlabs and Newzoo. Meanwhile, Microsoft was able to double Mixer's user base and even YouTube Gaming saw an increase in watched content. That said, Twitch still saw an overall 12% growth in viewership in 2019 compared to 2018.

One of the reasons for the drop in views is the number of high profile streamers who left Twitch for competing platforms. Tyler Blevins, aka Ninja, kicked off the Twitch exodus when he announced in August that he was going to be streaming exclusively on Microsoft's Mixer service.

Considering how influential Ninja has been in the Fortnite scene, including getting his own Fortnite skin in the game, this came as a massive loss for Twitch.

Mixer claimed another prominent Twitch streamer a few months later, namely Michael Grzsesiek, aka Shroud. He was well-known for streaming popular shooters such as Apex Legends and Rainbow Six: Siege. Along with Ninja, both garnered over 20 million total Twitch followers.

Microsoft is definitely using it's considerable resources to shore up Mixer as a legitimate competitor to Twitch. According to the report, Mixer doubled its viewership from 2018 to 2019 and has almost the same number of unique streaming channels as Twitch.

Not be outdone, YouTube Gaming garnered a big name streamer, CouRage, to stream exclusively on its platform. Overall, the platform had a 46% increase in hours watch in 2019 and accounted for around 22% market share. TechCrunch points out, however, that the big increase in hours probably isn't due to any one streamer but from broadcasting esports events.

Twitch remains by far the most popular streaming platform, but Mixer and YouTube are making significant progress in their own right. Even Facebook is trying to make its name known by grabbing a few well-known streamers such as Disguised Toast and Corinna Kopf. Competition is always good for consumers and it looks to only get even better in the future.

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psycros

TS Evangelist
Never even heard of Mixer, but then I don't really get the whole fad of watching other people playing games. Twitch also has a lousy UI which doesn't help it. Probably only Discord is worse.
 

Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
If you consider that streamers produce content, it's really not so far fetched to be paying the big one's millions of dollars to move platforms.
 

Danny101

TS Evangelist
Never even heard of Mixer, but then I don't really get the whole fad of watching other people playing games. Twitch also has a lousy UI which doesn't help it. Probably only Discord is worse.
I only do it for the time it takes to see if it's something worth buying. Usually for about 5 min. So in that way it's helpful, but that's on YouTube. I also will if I gets stuck.
 

MaitieS

TS Booster
I am happy that Twitch has competition. When you check /r/livestreamfail you will see how shitty Twitch is and how huge cap there is between: female and male streamers.
 

Blkm0nk3y92

TS Enthusiast
Wonder how many of the folks saying they don't understand watching people play games watch sports. Why watch them throw a football when you can go do it yourself?!
 
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mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
Never even heard of Mixer, but then I don't really get the whole fad of watching other people playing games. Twitch also has a lousy UI which doesn't help it. Probably only Discord is worse.
I don't get the fad of watching people play football either.