Build a PC Upgrade advice

neeyik

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Depends entirely on what kind of money you want to spend - after all, you could upgrade a single part or the entire setup.

Simplest and cheapest upgrade would be to add another 8 GB DRAM stick, as Ryzen CPUs definitely perform better in dual, rather than single, channel mode. Personally, I would get a matched pair set, like this one for $78, and sell the old stick on eBay.

Next up would be to replace the CPU with a more capable Ryzen - a 3600X would cost around $200 or so.

However, you'd see the biggest improvement by upgrading the graphics card - 1050 Ti's are okay, but it would be easily outperformed by a GeForce GTX 1660 Super, and a decent one of those will cost about $230.

The only thing to pay attention towards is that 1050 Ti graphics cards take all the power they need from the PCI Express slot, whereas 1660 Supers need an additional 8 pin PCIe power connection from the power supply unit.
 

Nexus Infinity

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Depends entirely on what kind of money you want to spend - after all, you could upgrade a single part or the entire setup.

Simplest and cheapest upgrade would be to add another 8 GB DRAM stick, as Ryzen CPUs definitely perform better in dual, rather than single, channel mode. Personally, I would get a matched pair set, like this one for $78, and sell the old stick on eBay.

Next up would be to replace the CPU with a more capable Ryzen - a 3600X would cost around $200 or so.

However, you'd see the biggest improvement by upgrading the graphics card - 1050 Ti's are okay, but it would be easily outperformed by a GeForce GTX 1660 Super, and a decent one of those will cost about $230.

The only thing to pay attention towards is that 1050 Ti graphics cards take all the power they need from the PCI Express slot, whereas 1660 Supers need an additional 8 pin PCIe power connection from the power supply unit.
this is exactly I was thinking but next gen cards are to announced this year and 1660 super price will drop and become obsolete soon, and I have a budget to upgrade either cpu or gpu. If I upgrade cpu the performance won't be boosted like upgrading an gpu
 

neeyik

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It's very easy to just always wait for the next round of model to be released, and hope that there's (a) a big price drop or (b) a significant increase in performance. A 1660 Super is massively more capable than your current 1050 Ti:



Sure you could upgrade to a better card, but unless you're going to upgrade your monitor as well (and I'm assuming it's 1080p, given your current GPU), that the 1660 Super's performance will be good for a while yet.

But if your question is "What should I upgrade between now and the end of 2020", then yes - wait for the next round of Radeon and GeForce cards to come out, and see what's available then. Do note, though, that Nvidia tends to release the lower end models a good while after the top end ones:

GeForce RTX 2080 Ti - Sept 2018
GeForce RTX 2070 - Oct 2018
GeForce RTX 2060 - Jan 2019
GeForce GTX 1660 - Mar 2019

So if your budget constraints are pushing you towards a 1660-esque graphics card, and you want to stay with Nvidia, you're probably not going to see a like-for-like replacement for the 1660 Super this year.
 

Nexus Infinity

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It's very easy to just always wait for the next round of model to be released, and hope that there's (a) a big price drop or (b) a significant increase in performance. A 1660 Super is massively more capable than your current 1050 Ti:



Sure you could upgrade to a better card, but unless you're going to upgrade your monitor as well (and I'm assuming it's 1080p, given your current GPU), that the 1660 Super's performance will be good for a while yet.

But if your question is "What should I upgrade between now and the end of 2020", then yes - wait for the next round of Radeon and GeForce cards to come out, and see what's available then. Do note, though, that Nvidia tends to release the lower end models a good while after the top end ones:

GeForce RTX 2080 Ti - Sept 2018
GeForce RTX 2070 - Oct 2018
GeForce RTX 2060 - Jan 2019
GeForce GTX 1660 - Mar 2019

So if your budget constraints are pushing you towards a 1660-esque graphics card, and you want to stay with Nvidia, you're probably not going to see a like-for-like replacement for the 1660 Super this year.
what if I upgrade cpu and add 8 gb ram
 

neeyik

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Sure, you could go for a Ryzen 5 3600 (almost as good as the 3600X but a fair bit cheaper) and add in more RAM - however, gaming is still going to be capped by the 1050 Ti. So you didn't change that GPU, you probably wouldn't see a huge difference in games, other than they would run more consistently (I.e. the frame rate wouldn't drop as much).

For example, when we tested the 2200G with a Radeon RX 550, this is the kind of performance we saw:



But then when we tested a 3600, with a GeForce 2080 Ti to remove any effects of the graphics load on the test results, the difference in the CPUs really stood out:



Notice how the 2200G kept up with the 1600X in Overwatch, when using the RX 550? But look how much the 1600X trails behind the 3600 in AC:O when paired with a strong GPU.

It all depends on what you use your PC for - if it's mostly gaming, then getting a new GPU now will make a far bigger difference. On the other hand, if you want to wait for the next batch of GPUs to be released by AMD and Nvidia, to see how things pan out, then getting a Ryzen 5 3600 and another 8 GB DIMM will set the system up perfectly for a future GPU upgrade.
 

neeyik

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The best way to answer that question is with another one: do you feel that your current 1050 Ti restricts what your 2200G is capable of doing in games? If the answer is 'yes', then a 1660 Super will go a long way to removing that barrier - it's twice as powerful as a 1050 Ti, regardless of what metric is used.
 
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cliffordcooley

Posts: 12,476   +5,853
The best way to answer that question is with another one:
I think they were asking if the 2200G would bottleneck using 1660. In which case the bottleneck would be less using lower rated cards.

My comment to such a question would depend on the software used. Bottlenecks are a tricky subject unless they are referrenced to a specific software.
 

Nexus Infinity

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I think they were asking if the 2200G would bottleneck using 1660. In which case the bottleneck would be less using lower rated cards.

My comment to such a question would depend on the software used. Bottlenecks are a tricky subject unless they are referrenced to a specific software.
The best way to answer that question is with another one: do you feel that your current 1050 Ti restricts what your 2200G is capable of doing in games? If the answer is 'yes', then a 1660 Super will go a long way to removing that barrier - it's twice as powerful as a 1050 Ti, regardless of what metric is used.
And for the psu I currently have cooler master masterwattLite , I know it is the worst but what can I get as alternate for low budget, also how mush watt psu is required for 1660super. (what about cx550w)

sorry for sounding like noob
 

Puiu

Posts: 4,033   +2,564
Before upgrading anything, I would upgrade the RAM. Single Channel just won't cut it anymore even if you put in a better GPU.

The cheapest, but best perf/$ upgrade would be:
- a compatible 8GB stick of ram (sell the one you have and buy 2x8 of the same kind if you can't find the exact same one)
- a 2nd gen R5 CPU (1600AF, 2600, 2600x)
- a GPU in the RX580/GTX 1060 - RX 5600XT/GTX 1660 Ti range (the best you can afford, you can find benchmarks here on techspot)

In general, if you have a 450W PSU that is not a crappy unknown brand, you should be able to fit everything. The 1660 super should be good enough and with low power draw too if the PSU is not good. If you don't have 6/8pin PCIe power connectors you could use some 4pin to 6/8pin adaptors.

As a side note, on that motherboard I would not try to put anything more powerful than a 6 core CPU. I don't even know if that mobo supports the newer Ryzen 3600/3600x on a bios level. (don't forget to update your bios)
 
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