US adds seven more Chinese supercomputing entities to blacklist

midian182

Posts: 6,663   +59
Staff member
What just happened? Not for the first time, the US government has added Chinese supercomputing entities to the same export blacklist Huawei has been on since 2019. The seven new names include Sunway Microelectronics, whose processors are found in the fourth most powerful supercomputer in the world—Sunway Microelectronics.

The Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has added the new names to the Entity list "for conducting activities that are contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States." Their addition means they now need licenses from the Commerce Department to do business with US companies.

"Supercomputing capabilities are vital for the development of many -- perhaps almost all -- modern weapons and national security systems, such as nuclear weapons and hypersonic weapons," Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo said in a statement.

The new additions include four supercomputer sites: The National Supercomputing Center Jinan, the National Supercomputing Center Shenzhen, the National Supercomputing Center Wuxi, and the National Supercomputing Center Zhengzhou.

Additionally, CPU developers Tianjin Phytium Information Technology and Sunway Microelectronics (Shenwei Microelectronics) were placed on the Entity List. Without access to American-made technologies, the Chinese companies will find it difficult, if not impossible, to continue making their processors, though The Washington Post writes that Phytium's microprocessors are produced by TSMC.

This isn't the first time Chines entities involved in the supercomputer industry were added to the Entity list; the Trump administration blacklisted five names in June 2019.

Japan's Supercomputer Fugaku remains the world's most powerful machine, followed by Summit (US), Sierra (US), Sunway TaihuLight (China), and Selena (US). China has almost double the number of Supercomputers on the list than its rival, 214 vs. 113.

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psycros

Posts: 3,395   +3,887
Think about it - China is basically helpless without western technology that they can buy or steal. Cut them off, bring all manufacturing back to the free world. Everyone wins except Wall Street scumbags who want slave labor to maximize their obscene profits. Printing endless money is not the answer to America's problems - beating the one-sided economies of Asia at their own game is.
 
Think about it - China is basically helpless without western technology that they can buy or steal. Cut them off, bring all manufacturing back to the free world. Everyone wins except Wall Street scumbags who want slave labor to maximize their obscene profits. Printing endless money is not the answer to America's problems - beating the one-sided economies of Asia at their own game is.
west don't make semiconductors at all, west(us) only has few of the core tech that it developed with 12+ nation's alliance,those few tech are used by US for long arm jurisdiction using swift system.More than 70% of semiconductor technology is owned by east( korea_japa_taiwan) if east sanctioned west it will be done .Only china has complete semiconductor manufacturing chain.in the world .East Asian has higher iq and 65% of global innovation comes from there, the west are only good in old gunboat diplomacy and attacking competitors using ww2 order leverage not in innovation and fair competition.
 

CrisisDog

Posts: 235   +132
I wonder how long China's standing will last, now that the US has limited them from purchasing modern CPU chips and using newer die fabrication facilities.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,839   +2,151
Staff member
west don't make semiconductors at all
So Intel doesn't count? It has 9 manufacturing plants in the US, 3 in Ireland, and 2 in Israel - only one of their plants is in China and that only makes NAND flash. There are other companies that would also disagree with such a blanket statement. GlobalFoundries, for example, has 3 plants in the US and 3 Germany (the rest are Singapore). ONS has 7 plants in the US, 1 in the Czech Republic, and others in Asia-Pacific; so does Micron and Texas Instruments.

While the likes of China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan have huge numbers of fabrication plants, and together they do indeed manufacture the bulk of the large scale chips sold today, there is a wealth of semiconductor manufacturing outside of the Asia-Pacific region.
 

Archean

Posts: 5,636   +95
I wonder how long China's standing will last, now that the US has limited them from purchasing modern CPU chips and using newer die fabrication facilities.


Don't see US shenanigans working for much longer for several counts. One, China has been investing in newer way to manufacture chips which bypasses all western controlled core technologies for several years, eg carbon-based semiconductor manufacturing. As far as I remember they've made good progress in this regard, which is pretty good for competition in the longer run. Therefore, I don't think US sanctions have any future once in about 4-5 years' time Chinese doubling down on the road to independence in chip manufacturing starts to pay off.

Key point which has been smoke screened behind all these sanctions drama was Huawei, only got targetted because in all probability NSA & Co. realized that with Huawei taking over the new gen networks in a major way, can diminish their ability to freely monitor global internet; which can indeed be big set back.
 

Knot Schure

Posts: 347   +161
So Intel doesn't count? It has 9 manufacturing plants in the US, 3 in Ireland, and 2 in Israel - only one of their plants is in China and that only makes NAND flash. There are other companies that would also disagree with such a blanket statement. GlobalFoundries, for example, has 3 plants in the US and 3 Germany (the rest are Singapore). ONS has 7 plants in the US, 1 in the Czech Republic, and others in Asia-Pacific; so does Micron and Texas Instruments.

While the likes of China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan have huge numbers of fabrication plants, and together they do indeed manufacture the bulk of the large scale chips sold today, there is a wealth of semiconductor manufacturing outside of the Asia-Pacific region.

Was thinking the same thing. I worked next to an Intel plant in OR, at a datacenter.