Many considered last month’s landmark decision on net neutrality as a win for the Internet. The proposal promised to do away with things like paid prioritization and classify broadband as a public utility through selective enforcement of Title II of the Communications Act of 1934.

But without actually seeing the proposal, proponents really had no idea exactly what they were championing and were more or less trusting the FCC to do the “right thing.” On Thursday, the FCC published the full text of its Open Internet Order which gives ordinary citizens their first look at the new rules.

If you were hoping for a quick read, guess again – we’re talking about a 400-page document here. Those with a strong stance on net neutrality are encouraged to give it a read.

Ralph de la Vega, CEO of AT&T’s business and mobility arm, said until everybody reads the fine print and understands it, they won’t be able to comment in detail. The executive said he plans to read it cover to cover.

The order aims to strike down some of the beliefs that opponents of net neutrality have. It states that it is Title II tailored for the 21st century and unlike the application of Title II to incumbent wireline companies in the 20th century, a swath of utility-style provisions (including tariffing) will not be applied.

Despite the ruling and publishing of new rules, the matter is far from over as broadband providers like AT&T and Comcast are expected to sue the FCC to try and block the order.