AMD gains CPU market share in desktops, laptops, and servers

DragonSlayer101

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What just happened? AMD has gained CPU market share over the past quarter across desktops, laptops and servers. The report comes from PC hardware market research firm Mercury Research, who has split the results in two categories: revenue share and unit share.

According to Mercury Research (via Tom's Hardware), AMD gained 5.8 percent unit share in desktops, 3.8 percent in laptops, and 5.8 percent in servers. In terms of revenue share, Team Red gained 4.1 percent in desktops, 5.1 percent in laptops, and 1.7 percent in servers. The report does not mention competitors by name, but the global PC industry only has one other major CPU supplier, Intel, which has a major stake in all the market segments.

While Intel and AMD make x86 processors for PCs, Qualcomm offers Arm-based SoCs for Windows notebooks, but its market share is minuscule by comparison. So, while the report doesn't say anything about the market share of Intel or Qualcomm, it is fair to assume that most of AMD's gains came at Intel's expense.

Based on this data, AMD believes its desktop market share was at 19.2 percent in Q3 2023, a 5.3 percentage increase from the 13.9 percent share during the same period last year. In the laptop market, the company's estimated market share was 19.5 percent, up from 15.7 percent during Q2 2022. In the server market, AMD garnered a 23.4 percent share, up from 17.5 percent during the year-ago quarter.

The report attributes AMD's strong showing to its 4th-gen EPYC and Ryzen 7000-series processors, both of which were released over the past year. It is interesting that the Ryzen 7000 lineup has been such a hit for AMD, as it requires a total platform upgrade to socket AM5 and DDR5 memory. In comparison, Intel's 13th- and 14th-gen Raptor Lake processors still use the same LGA 1700 socket as its 12th-gen Alder Lake CPUs, and support both DDR4 and DDR5 RAM, meaning people do not have to invest in new motherboard and RAM to jump to the latest platform.

The global PC market is starting to show signs of recovery after multiple quarters of negative growth. Over the past few months, sales showed a marked upsurge, thanks to increased consumer activity for the back-to-school season. With the holiday season now in full swing, sales should remain strong for PC OEMs, which is good news for chipmakers like Intel and AMD.

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Keep up the good work, AMD. You are doing the PC world a great service by helping to transform ChipZilla into ChipKitten. 🤣

For me, the systems I have replaced and the two (one of which is an Ivy Bridge-X) that I am going to replace are so old that there was no point in trying to upgrade them. I have no regrets going with the 7000 series.
 
I see a lot more AM4 based system selling from OEM's then I see AM5, same on the parts side, the 5800 and 5600's can be had for super cheap as well as a nice B550 board and ddr4 is dirt cheap atm. Laptops are a mix going into summer was still mainly 5000 and 6000 series chips for sale with a few 7000's on the market, now at the holiday season it's prob 3/4 7000 series. Nice gain in the server market though, that's the big money.
 
I see a lot more AM4 based system selling from OEM's then I see AM5, same on the parts side, the 5800 and 5600's can be had for super cheap as well as a nice B550 board and ddr4 is dirt cheap atm. Laptops are a mix going into summer was still mainly 5000 and 6000 series chips for sale with a few 7000's on the market, now at the holiday season it's prob 3/4 7000 series. Nice gain in the server market though, that's the big money.
I think OEMs are waiting for the new AM5 APUs. AMD has been slow on the release of their APUs and they could be really compelling offerings, especially in the mobile space. Hell, I'd pick one up just as help as a diagnostice tool if anything went wrong the the GPU. After my 1070ti died at the height of the GPU shortage I would have been thrilled what AMD said APUs would have been when they started talking about them. I see top tier CPU performance silly in today's age of ray tracing focused GPUs. As long as I get 70+FPS in games I'm happy and even older CPUs can do that in most games.
 
Intel still dwarfs this by a staggering margin....which is godod; because I guarantee if AMD ever becomesas dominant as Intel or Nvidia in class. ...they will become just as predatory. There are no Robin Hoods in big business; anyone thinking otherwiss is deluded on the human conndition.
 
Intel still dwarfs this by a staggering margin....which is godod; because I guarantee if AMD ever becomesas dominant as Intel or Nvidia in class. ...they will become just as predatory. There are no Robin Hoods in big business; anyone thinking otherwiss is deluded on the human conndition.

That mat be true - but some of the crimes Intel did -would get much more massive fines now in like the EC
People are now happy that we don't have to put up with Intel just giving us not much more each year on year for big prices.
Plus Intel did a lot of dirty underhanded tactics

TBF seems most big corps have been guilty of price fixing , anti-competitive behaviour etc
 
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I think OEMs are waiting for the new AM5 APUs. AMD has been slow on the release of their APUs and they could be really compelling offerings, especially in the mobile space. Hell, I'd pick one up just as help as a diagnostice tool if anything went wrong the the GPU. After my 1070ti died at the height of the GPU shortage I would have been thrilled what AMD said APUs would have been when they started talking about them. I see top tier CPU performance silly in today's age of ray tracing focused GPUs. As long as I get 70+FPS in games I'm happy and even older CPUs can do that in most games.
The current crop of Ryzen 7000-series desktop chips have a rudimentary GPU onboard for just that kind of diagnostic. Heck, I remember building my new Ryzen 7700X system on a sort of work bench while my old system was still running with my GPU still in it. I had video on the 7700X system even though I had no dedicated GPU plugged in.
 
The current crop of Ryzen 7000-series desktop chips have a rudimentary GPU onboard for just that kind of diagnostic. Heck, I remember building my new Ryzen 7700X system on a sort of work bench while my old system was still running with my GPU still in it. I had video on the 7700X system even though I had no dedicated GPU plugged in.
I rebuilt my home server/router/internet gateway not too long ago; it runs openSuSE LEAP linux. I'm running a 7600X. I specifically built the system without a discrete GPU because that system does not need a discrete GPU, and the 7600X handles the graphics perfectly.
 
I think OEMs are waiting for the new AM5 APUs. AMD has been slow on the release of their APUs and they could be really compelling offerings, especially in the mobile space. Hell, I'd pick one up just as help as a diagnostice tool if anything went wrong the the GPU. After my 1070ti died at the height of the GPU shortage I would have been thrilled what AMD said APUs would have been when they started talking about them. I see top tier CPU performance silly in today's age of ray tracing focused GPUs. As long as I get 70+FPS in games I'm happy and even older CPUs can do that in most games.
The latest 7000 series already all have GPU's in them, even my 7950X3D has a GPU on it. they aren't massively powerful or anything but if you're an OEM making a machine to do basic office tasks (Outlook, browse the web) it's plenty.
 
Just got a 7730u lenovo laptop. 8c/16t zen3, runs cool and whisper quiet. I could buy a 13500h for the same price, but I wouldn't trade slightly better performance for 2-3x the power in a laptop.Shame it only has a vega 8 but at least the igpu only draws 1-2w for desktop and browsing.Shared vram means no vram downclocking bugs.I kept a video playlist on loop for the night to test the battery, still had 41% left in the morning. If I had used my bt speaker instead of built-in ones, it'd have been more for certain.
 
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