Analysts estimate SSD prices will drop 50 percent by mid-2023

AlphaX

Posts: 67   +16
Staff
Something to look forward to: As SSD and NAND prices gradually decline, analysts now believe the price drops have no end in sight. The latest projections show that next year, consumers may be able to add 2TB worth of SSD storage to their PC for less than $100.

It's safe to say that one of the best inventions for PC components was the creation of NAND flash and the subsequent M.2 SSDs. The ability to store upwards of multiple terabytes of data on a storage device nearly the same size as a stick of gum is fantastic.Unfortunately, M.2 drives with those high amounts of data have been unfathomable for most consumers for a while.

Recently, SSDs have seen significant price cuts and capacity increases. Just six years ago, a 1 TB NVMe drive from Samsung cost nearly $500. Now, the same SSDs go for $90. That's an 80-percent price cut. Analysts believe this steady price decline will continue. Estimations indicate current SSD costs could be cut in half by the middle of 2023. If projections prove correct, 1 TB M.2 SSDs could retail for around $50, 2 TB SSDs might reach sub-$100 prices, and the 4 TB drives approaching the $200 mark might put them within reach of budget-minded customers.

Continued oversupply won't limit price drops exclusively to M.2 SSDs, as SATA SSDs should reach noticeable lows next year. Depending on which brand you choose, a 1 TB SATA SSD might cost anywhere between $50 and $90. We could see these SSD prices fall below current 3.5" hard drive prices.

Trendfocus notes that the primary influence accounting for the recent steep price cuts is OEMs can now produce NAND chips much faster than ever. The contracting tech sector and over-manufacturing resulted in a surplus of products that will not sell at their initially determined price point.

These next few months should be an excellent time for those looking to upgrade their PC's storage. Next year could be even better.

Unfortunately, for AM5 early adopters or those already on Intel's LGA1700 architecture, these price cuts won't affect the upcoming PCIe 5.0 SSDs. Those drives will be a hot commodity, and retailers will likely try to make up losses by taking advantage of the high demand.

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R00sT3R

Posts: 771   +2,398
These things should already be dirt cheap. They're not new tech anymore, they're mainstream and how anyone can think it costs more to make a no moving parts SSD than a multiple moving mechanical parts traditional metal drive, is beyond me.

The only reason they're still so expensive on a per GB basis is because manufacturers are exploiting the customers desire for speed.
 

Luay

Posts: 123   +63
This is the direction technology products are supposed to head to, unless there was an artificial interference by the manufacturer.

Flash industry shareholders are jealous of the Chip industry shareholders. They will try something in the next two quarters, be it false flag disaster/artificial price hike, reducing factories' output etc.. whatever it takes to gauge prices.

Looking at chips, specifically Nvidia, Current RTX 4080 12GB should be a RTX 4060, not 4070 as some argue, if moore's law was applied, and can be sold for $400 with profit.

RTX4080 16GB should be the 4070, and should be $600.

The real RTX4080 isn't announced yet. we did get the "real" 4090, but it should be $1,000.

I'll get back to flash, but this is all the doing of shareholders. It wasn't the lockdowns in Chinese factories, nor was it the logistical challenges, and definitely wasn't from the demand of mining Crypto. Just shareholders prioritizing short term profit since the competition is allowing it and the consumers are submissive.

Imagine what the flash industry shareholders are feeling now. They're jealous and they don't want this kind of progress. They don't even want the same profit. They want more. Time will tell.
 

flee2020

Posts: 42   +39
These things should already be dirt cheap. They're not new tech anymore, they're mainstream and how anyone can think it costs more to make a no moving parts SSD than a multiple moving mechanical parts traditional metal drive, is beyond me.

The only reason they're still so expensive on a per GB basis is because manufacturers are exploiting the customers desire for speed.
Correct - and they market them based on sequential access data rates. Most users don't move large files every day. They tend to work on smaller files. As such, the speed increases are not what they are made out to be because smaller files don't take that long to read and write.

Unless you are a content creator who renders large video files, you are not likely to be able to feel much difference in SSD speeds - so there isn't much point in buying expensive SSDs if all you are doing is web browsing and working on office data.
 

yannus

Posts: 154   +141
Last time they analyzed SSD prices to increase. Which one is it?
Is it because analysts can't make up their minds between corrupt corporations that illegally set the prices, the logic of the market, and fabricated inflation ? Or is it because they 're just playing with us ?