Computer and Information Sciences degrees are the most loved among recent grads

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,572   +174
Staff member
The big picture: Selecting a career path is arguably the biggest decision a young person will face up to that point in their life, and most don't get it right out of the gate. Among those that choose college, roughly four out of five end up changing their major at least once according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Even students that stick with it and cross the finish line can regret their choice in hindsight.

According to a recent ZipRecruiter survey of more than 1,500 college graduates looking for a job, nearly half – 44 percent – said they regret their college major choice.

Journalism was the most regretted college major. Sociology and liberal arts / general studies tied for second place followed by degrees in communications and education. Political science, biology and English language / literature also made the top 10 list.

Not everyone hated their major selection. Among those surveyed, the happiest graduates were those with degrees in computer and information sciences, criminology, engineering and nursing. Most with degrees in business administration / management, finance, psychology and human resources said they'd choose the same major if they had it to do over again.

It should come as little surprise that there's a correlation between feelings about degrees and current job prospects as well as pay. Computer science graduates, for example, are in high demand across multiple industries with an annual average salary north of $100,000.

ZipRecruiter found that among communications graduates, those who are happy with their field are earning 1.6 times more than those who would select a different degree. Similarly, satisfied grads with marketing management / research degrees are earning three times more than those with regrets.

Of course, college isn't for everyone. Plenty of people head right into the workforce straight out of high school, and many become very successful. Taking this route eliminates the possibility of being saddled with student loan debt and affords a head start on peers that are still studying.

Image credit: Ekrulila

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psycros

Posts: 4,559   +6,867
An actual *programming* degree will typically mean that you'll never want for work and be paid pretty well regardless of where you live. An information technology degree, however, is nearly worthless these days. You're better off getting industry certifications, with A+ and N+ being the minimum.
 

sorten

Posts: 182   +296
TechSpot Elite
Not surprising given the job prospects for CS majors, though recent grads might need to be patient if they live anywhere near a Meta or Twitter campus this year.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 9,363   +8,581
Just shows again that most kids have to make the most important decision of their life when they are least prepared. Mine in communications served me well but after I picked up my Masters in Science things really picked up ....
 

BigRedPDX

Posts: 305   +213
I have finished 2 years of mechanical engineering, 2 years of computer engineering, and don't forget the 2 years of computer science. All 3 of those require 4 years to get any sort of paper from them. If I could do it over again I would have taken Information Systems, which is a 2 year degree, and then went on to Computer Engineering. I don't really regret the programs I've attempted. I learned a lot, but for reason pertaining to life, I couldn't finish them. I managed with A+ alone and now I'm a system admin at a law firm. Most places would rather take the experience than see your test results.
 
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dualkelly

Posts: 255   +325
Ha they should go back and survey Nursing degree after a year on the job. 50% of Nurse graduates do not renew their nursing license after 2 years. It has a high attrition rate.
 

Knot Schure

Posts: 410   +197
An actual *programming* degree will typically mean that you'll never want for work and be paid pretty well regardless of where you live. An information technology degree, however, is nearly worthless these days. You're better off getting industry certifications, with A+ and N+ being the minimum.
Got those, but I found the respect came with CCNA & CCNP.
I still do recommend A+ & N+ to newbies, as at least they can get their cabling & interfaces right, and BCD is not alien to them either.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,947   +6,945
Got those, but I found the respect came with CCNA & CCNP.
I still do recommend A+ & N+ to newbies, as at least they can get their cabling & interfaces right, and BCD is not alien to them either.
CCNA/P can be had as cert though, cant they? I remember prepping to take those tests back in high school.
Ha they should go back and survey Nursing degree after a year on the job. 50% of Nurse graduates do not renew their nursing license after 2 years. It has a high attrition rate.
The entire healthcare industry is screwed beyond belief.
Just shows again that most kids have to make the most important decision of their life when they are least prepared. Mine in communications served me well but after I picked up my Masters in Science things really picked up ....
It's amazing to me that rushing into uni at 18 is considered normal. There's nothing wrong with waiting for 5-10 years, into your late 20s/30s before jumping on something.
 

BigRedPDX

Posts: 305   +213
Got those, but I found the respect came with CCNA & CCNP.
I still do recommend A+ & N+ to newbies, as at least they can get their cabling & interfaces right, and BCD is not alien to them either.
I'm a system admin with A+ alone. Not even an N+ cert. In some cases, companies like to see the work experience before going through a list of certifications. Some of us tech guys are terrible test takers.