Overclocking Core i7-3770k temps high after installing Hyper 212 Evo?

karol3

TS Rookie
I recently installed the hyper 212 evo on my core i7 3770k at stock frequency after some trouble. My temps after 25mins of prime 95 are 47 C from asus AI suite and core temp the temps are 63, 60, 67, 69. This is at full load during prime 95.

Is the cooler mounted correctly and are my temps good for overclocking?

The cooler fan rpm are 850-900.
 

slh28

TechSpot Paladin
What voltage are you using? Stock voltage is usually way too high, try undervolting as much as you can without getting BSODs and you should see temps drop. But at the moment they don't look too excessive.
 

karol3

TS Rookie
My ambient temps were a bit high in my house. Are those good temps or is the CPU cooler mounted wrong.
 

slh28

TechSpot Paladin
First of all download CPU-Z or Open HW Monitor to check your CPU voltage, it has a big impact on CPU temps and for Ivy Bridge chips like yours in particular. Ivy Bridge starts to get really hot over 1.2-1.25V or so. Mounting a cooler incorrectly or missing off the thermal paste will result in 90C+ temps so it looks like yours is on properly.
 

misor

TS Evangelist
My ambient temps were a bit high in my house. Are those good temps or is the CPU cooler mounted wrong.
what is the ambiant temperature?

if you suspect that the cpu cooler is mounted improperly, then you can power down your unit, then remove HSF, then clean it with alcohol or your favorite thermal paste remover.
as adviced by previous poster, you can then aply a pea-sized thermal paste to heat sink, then attach the fan and everything else.

also, some say that it will take about 200 on-and-off before the thermal paste is "ready"...
 

hood6558

TS Evangelist
I recommend water cooling to any one who overclocks, especially with Ivy Bridge chips, since there are all-in-one kits out there for as little as $60. That's only $30 more than a Hyper 212 Evo, cools much better with less noise, and doesn't strain your motherboard or limit your RAM choices. To me, air cooling the CPU doesn't make sense these days, with so much competition in the liquid cooling area. Prices can only go down, and cooling efficiency can only improve, as the market matures. My H100 may already be obsolete with 140 x 280 sealed liquid coolers from NZXT hitting the shelves. But it still cools great.
 

Jad Chaar

Elite Techno Geek
I recommend water cooling to any one who overclocks, especially with Ivy Bridge chips, since there are all-in-one kits out there for as little as $60. That's only $30 more than a Hyper 212 Evo, cools much better with less noise, and doesn't strain your motherboard or limit your RAM choices. To me, air cooling the CPU doesn't make sense these days, with so much competition in the liquid cooling area. Prices can only go down, and cooling efficiency can only improve, as the market matures. My H100 may already be obsolete with 140 x 280 sealed liquid coolers from NZXT hitting the shelves. But it still cools great.
But they only last 4-5 years and run the risk of breaking. I do not recommend them at all if you are an average user.
 

DonNagual

TechSpot Ambassador
I recently installed the hyper 212 evo on my core i7 3770k at stock frequency after some trouble. My temps after 25mins of prime 95 are 47 C from asus AI suite and core temp the temps are 63, 60, 67, 69. This is at full load during prime 95.

Is the cooler mounted correctly and are my temps good for overclocking?

The cooler fan rpm are 850-900.

Those temps are just fine. I'm just in the process of OCing my i7 3770k, and have had some great information given on various forums. One thing I would recommend though is not using the AI suite for your temps. Check again with realtemp. It will show a higher temp, but you should try and stay below 90c on Prime95

Check out dividedbyzero's posts near the end of this thread: https://www.techspot.com/community/topics/overclocking-i7-3770k-question-about-speedfan.192653/
 

GhostRyder

TS Evangelist
With the i7-3770k you get a decent headroom for heat. Normally you want to keep that chip below 70 under load which you seem to be doing just fine.

Honestly you should be fine, the 3770 tends to run a bit hot under load, juse be careful when hitting those 70's under load because if you do alot of gaming or stressing on it, its just a bit of unecessary wear and tear.

If the fans only spin up to 900RPM and you worried, you might look into gettting some higher fans to help with that and having a nice exhaust to keep hot air out of your case.

JC713 They last a bit longer than 2 years, most places recommend changing them after 4 or 5 years if we are speaking about sealed loops systems like the Antec 920.
 

Jad Chaar

Elite Techno Geek
With the i7-3770k you get a decent headroom for heat. Normally you want to keep that chip below 70 under load which you seem to be doing just fine.

Honestly you should be fine, the 3770 tends to run a bit hot under load, juse be careful when hitting those 70's under load because if you do alot of gaming or stressing on it, its just a bit of unecessary wear and tear.

If the fans only spin up to 900RPM and you worried, you might look into gettting some higher fans to help with that and having a nice exhaust to keep hot air out of your case.

JC713 They last a bit longer than 2 years, most places recommend changing them after 4 or 5 years if we are speaking about sealed loops systems like the Antec 920.
Yeah, after I did some research I noticed that. That was a old post.
 

DonNagual

TechSpot Ambassador
With the i7-3770k you get a decent headroom for heat. Normally you want to keep that chip below 70 under load which you seem to be doing just fine.

It's so confusing to talk about temps these days.

For example right now on prime95 I get around 85-90c using realtemp, and 70c using both speedfan and asus AI suite II.

From another thread, it seems most agree that speedfan is garbage, and programs like realtemp are the ones to be using.
 

GhostRyder

TS Evangelist
It's different sensors using different programs. Real temp is the main one to worry about for me at least because its very nice and accurate.

You also need to check if its the socket temp or the core temps. Each can have their own areas and limits, though core temps tend to be more important.
 

Jad Chaar

Elite Techno Geek
If you can access temperatures from the BIOS. Those readings will be the most accurate since they use the best sensors available to the CPU/motherboard.
 

hood6558

TS Evangelist
But they only last 4-5 years and run the risk of breaking. I do not recommend them at all if you are an average user.
All Corsair Hydro Series coolers have a 5 year warranty, except H40, H50, & H70 (2 years). Don't you think that in 5 long years there will be coolers that perform much better, maybe orders of magnitude better (new technology)? Or that maybe you'd upgrade to a custom loop by then? Besides, if it breaks under warranty, Corsair will probably send you a brand new one, or even an upgraded model if yours is discontinued (H40/H70/H80/H100 are no longer sold on Corsair's website). Cooler Master's air & water coolers have only a 2 year warranty, 6 years for Noctua (air), Thermaltake's is 3 years for air coolers, 1 year for liquid coolers (except Water 2.0 - 3 years). So most of Corsair's liquid coolers are no risk at all compared to the alternatives, and you can keep your 212 Evo or whatever handy in case you ever have to send your liquid cooler in for replacement.
 

Jad Chaar

Elite Techno Geek
Corsair uses high quality loops, but still, say there was a leak that kills your CPU and GPU. A warranty from Corsair cant fix that.
 

dividebyzero

trainee n00b
All Corsair Hydro Series coolers have a 5 year warranty, except H40, H50, & H70 (2 years).
That's probably because the latter are rebranded Asetek units. The lack of flexibility in the hoses, and cooling plate/base sealing can have some disastrous effects (as JC713 noted). The CoolIT rebrands (H80, H100 etc) have a better reputation of reliability.

As with any product, I'd recommend looking at peer reviews and the relevant forums for a good overview of the product, long term usage pattern, and customer service/RMA satisfaction rating.
 
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Jad Chaar

Elite Techno Geek
That's probably because the latter are rebranded Asetek units. The lack of flexibility in the hoses, and cooling plate/base sealing can have some disastrous effects (as JC713 noted). The CoolIT rebrands (H80, H100 etc) have a better reputation of reliability.

As with any product, I'd recommend looking at peer reviews and the relevant forums for a good overview of the product, long term usage pattern, and customer service/RMA satisfaction rating.
Interesting to know Corsair rebrands their water coolers.
 

hood6558

TS Evangelist
CoolIT have their own line of AIOs and Corsair slap their sticker on ECO line
Asetek sell mainly to OEMs in the U.S. (their LCLC is available in retail in some markets), and are sold rebranded by Antec, Zalman, Corsair, NZXT, Thermaltake, AMD, Dell, and Intel
Yeah, most are just jumping on the bandwagon, not creating their own innovative solutions. That's why I like the Swiftech H220, it's much higher quality and expandable as well, and created in-house after 3 years of R&D.