Framework details memory, storage, and other options for new 16-inch modular laptop

Daniel Sims

Posts: 1,287   +43
Staff
In brief: Framework recently released the first upgrade for its 13-inch modular laptop series after announcing that a 16-inch variant is coming. While the company has been gradually revealing information about the hardware of the larger model, details regarding the unique feature of a swappable dedicated GPU are still pending.

After announcing the addition of a 16-inch tier to its modular laptop series, Framework has provided in-depth information on various aspects of the system including the display, power adapter, chassis, and memory options. The company plans to reveal more details about the remaining hardware specifications in the coming months.

The 16-inch Framework laptop will feature a 16:10 aspect ratio, 2,600 x 1,600 matte LCD with a variable refresh rate of up to 165 Hz. The semi-custom panel from BOE has a 100 percent DCI-P3 color gamut, a 9ms rise+fall time, and a 1,500:1 contrast ratio at 500 nits of brightness.

According to the company, these specifications provide a better balance between gaming, content creation, and general productivity than the original 13-inch model.

In addition, Framework highlighted the ease of screen replacement for the 16-inch model. While the Framework 16 won't initially come with a touchscreen, the seamless replaceability offers the potential for users to upgrade to a touchscreen in the future.

In terms of power, the 16-inch model surpasses the Framework 13's 60W adapter with a 180W adapter that uses the same IEC C5 connector. Customers will also have the option to customize the modular laptop with a 240W USB PD 3.1 adapter (instead of the standard USB-C brick), likely to get more performance out of the dedicated graphics card. Further details about the battery will be revealed by Framework in due course.

The 16-inch version of the Framework laptop, like its Ryzen-powered counterpart, features two SO-DIMM sockets that support semi-custom DDR5-5600 RAM. Each socket can accommodate up to 32 GB, allowing the system to reach a maximum capacity of 64 GB. Framework offers modules in 8 GB, 16 GB, and 32 GB configurations.

When it comes to storage, the Framework 16 offers two PCIe 4.0 M.2 sockets: one 2280 socket that can accommodate up to 8 TB of storage, and a 2230 socket supporting up to 2 TB. Pre-built models come with Western Digital's SN810, which boasts sequential read speeds up to 6.6 GB/s.

The company previously confirmed that customers will have the option to utilize some of the laptop's expansion bays for additional M.2. sockets, increasing maximum storage capacity to 16 TB. Framework also sells 256 GB and 1 TB USB-C expansion cards, which provide sequential read speeds of up to 1 GB/s.

Specifics regarding the connectors, keyboard, and expansion bay system are still forthcoming. We already know the keyboard will support multiple key counts, languages, and other features. The expansion bays will allow swappable GPUs – a holy grail for gaming laptops – and the company hopes GPU vendors and partners will back this ambitious feature. However, the bays could also support other internal components.

Permalink to story.

 
I really like the sound of this thing the more I hear about it.

Other sites reported that its pinout has a set of pins specifically for a "2nd battery". If they actually offer a high capacity second battery then I'd be willing to dump the thousands they want for it, I'd LOVE to finally have a big beefy battery tied into a ryzen 7000 laptop with upgrade-able parts. That's a dream come true.
 
Concept seems interesting, but the price is gonna be too insane for me. I personally just can't stand the sound from modern laptops. I have yet to find a sub $800 laptop with better speakers than my galaxy tablet when it comes to clarity detail and bass (they can get louder though) and I can't stand the sound of fans in laptops. They compromise a lot to make them thin which means the fan is thinner and has to spin faster to move the same amount of air, not to mention the waffer thin heatpipes and heatsinks giving the CPU's almost no thermal room in there cooling systems ad all that up and modern laptops are just so flipping loud. I work on hundreds of different models a month and I am amazed how much quieter a supposedly hotter less efficient laptop from 2010-2014 is than a modern laptop. I will just stick to my tablet for laptop needs, DEX can help me with the more laptop like things I need to do if I want and I can use any bluetooth keyboard with it I want.
 
Last edited:
Concept seems interesting, but the price is gonna be too insane for me. I personally just can't stand the sound from modern laptops. I have yet to find a sub $800 laptop with better speakers than my galaxy tablet when it comes to clarity detail and bass (they can get louder though) and I can't stand the sound of fans in laptops. They compromise a lot to make them thin which means the fan is thinner and has to spin faster to move the same amount of air, not to mention the waffer thin heatpipes and heatsinks giving the CPU's almost no thermal room in there cooling systems ad all that up and modern laptops are just so flipping loud. I work on hundreds of different models a month and I am amazed how much quieter a supposedly hotter less efficient laptop from 2010-2014 is than a modern laptop. I will just stick to my tablet for laptop needs, DEX can help me with the more laptop like things I need to do if I want and I can use any bluetooth keyboard with it I want.
If you can do what you need to do on a tablet a laptop would likely not need to ramp its fans up to cool it off.

Trying to find amazing speakers and a quiet fan on a sub $800 laptop is an impossible situation. That's like trying to find a heads up display and electric motor on a sub $10k car.

The thing with the Framework laptops is you'll be able to upgrade and replace parts when it's time to upgrade meaning you'll save money on your next upgrade and you'll be able to put your old laptop motherboard into a standalone case if you have a need for a desk top.



 
Back