Gigabyte Aorus 49-inch QD-OLED gaming monitor uses AI to help prevent burn-in

midian182

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In brief: We've seen plenty of companies shoehorning AI into their products, even when it isn't a good fit and not very useful. With Gigabyte's new curved QD-OLED gaming monitor, however, the technology is supposedly being used to help minimize the dreaded threat of screen burn-in.

The Aorus CO49DQ is joining the increasingly packed segment of giant gaming monitors. The 49-inch monster has a 5120 x 1440 resolution on its 1800R curved screen and offers plenty of gaming-focused specs, including a 144Hz refresh rate, 0.03ms GtG response time, and several gamer features such as crosshair.

The monitor also comes with a 10-bit color depth, a typical brightness of 250 cd/m² (1,000 nits for HDR content), and a contrast ratio of 1,500,000:1. The display is VESA DisplayHDR True Black 400 certified and covers 99% of the DCI-P3 color space.

The headline feature is the AI integration within the Aorus CO49DQ. Gigabyte says it uses an AI-based algorithm that can minimize the risk of burn-in problems, which can be an issue with OLEDs. The company says it does this via a series of OLED protection technologies such as Care+, usage time, pixel clean, static control, pixel shift, APL stabilize, and sub-logo Dim. Many other OLED monitors/TVs offer the same or similar features, so it will be interesting to see if combining them with AI smarts makes burn-in less likely to occur.

The Aorus CO49DQ has a good port selection: two HDMI 2.1, DisplayPort 1.4 with HBR3, USB Type-C with 18W PD and a USB hub with one USB upstream and two USB 3.2 downstream. There's also a headphone jack.

Other features include a KVM switch for those who like to quickly switch between multiple devices while using the same keyboard and mouse. The feature works alongside the Picture-in-Picture (PiP) and Picture-By-Picture (PbP) modes.

Another compelling element in the Aorus CO49DQ is the way the monitor uses a built-in power supply (72W AC power input) rather than an external power brick, which is always welcome. It offers swivel and tilt adjustment (no height adjustment) and has a 100 x 100 VESA mount.

No word yet on the launch date or all-important price. For comparison, the similar Asus ROG Swift OLED PG49WCD has a $1,300 MSRP, so don't be surprised if the Gigabyte Aorus CO49DQ is around the same amount.

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"A marketing team realise that AI is a popular buzzword and inserts it into their marketing material for their new product in the hope of attracting sales"

Fixed that headline for you.

Hit the nail on the head. If you want to stretch it far enough, my toaster has AI to know when to pop up. Everything we see in the near future is going to be talking about their AI - actual or not.
 
99% of the time when they say AI they really mean "we made a simple algorithm"

It's especially egregious now that we are in the era of ACTUAL AI
 
99% of the time when they say AI they really mean "we made a simple algorithm"

It's especially egregious now that we are in the era of ACTUAL AI
Hit the nail on the head. If you want to stretch it far enough, my toaster has AI to know when to pop up. Everything we see in the near future is going to be talking about their AI - actual or not.
"A marketing team realise that AI is a popular buzzword and inserts it into their marketing material for their new product in the hope of attracting sales"

Fixed that headline for you.

Yup. It's probably just standard machine learning techniques, but that gets confused with AI all the time. There is overlap between the two, but they are not the same. Ditto with machine learning vs statistics, machine learning vs software development, and generative AI (*ahem* generative machine learning) vs ChatGPT. Overlap, but not strictly the same.
 
From the pictures, that's already at max height, it only goes down...
I get it. I thought you were commenting on any lack of vertical adjustment, not max height. I suppose there are small "risers" for that scenario. Or of course, adjustable VESA mounts.

I have a two-tier shelved desktop setup, which all but eliminates the problem. Keeps my monitor at the perfect level at the lowest height. Something like this:

1703809908861.png
 
I get it. I thought you were commenting on any lack of vertical adjustment, not max height. I suppose there are small "risers" for that scenario. Or of course, adjustable VESA mounts.

I have a two-tier shelved desktop setup, which all but eliminates the problem. Keeps my monitor at the perfect level at the lowest height. Something like this:

View attachment 89384
Yeah, VESA mounts are pretty much the only way to go if you want to raise it properly. The two tier desk looks really nice too although those I've seen are a bit too expensive or too tall for my liking.
 
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