Kia's Imagine EV concept uses 21 screens to build the dashboard of the future

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

Concept cars are meant to be outlandish in nature – an avenue to spark conversation about the future of automotive manufacturing and design. Yet lately, they’ve kinda become dull and predictable. Kia is bucking that trend at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

Its Kia Imagine EV concept looks tame enough on the outside – save for the wheels, perhaps – but it’s the interior that really has people talking.

The highlight, of course, is on the dashboard – an array of 21 angled smartphone-sized screens that make up a collective display unlike anything else we’ve ever seen. It immediately reminded me of some of the exotic architecture on display in Las Vegas – namely, the Aria.

Of course, it’s just a concept and one that Kia is having fun with. “These 21 incredibly thin screens are a humorous and irreverent riposte to the ongoing competition between some automotive manufacturers to see who can produce the car with the biggest screen," interior designer Ralph Kluge told Engadget.

In speaking to The Verge, Kluge said it’s a “pure concept” that doesn’t have any sort of timeline or production plans.

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Capaill

TS Evangelist
I presume they are mocking the newer Mercedes models, where the digital display starts behind the wheel and continues almost over to the passenger's seat.
 
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toooooot

TS Evangelist
This model with luxury package will use 21 iPhone xr to form that one screen. Mid tier will only use Motorola Gs
 

QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
Why bother wasting resources to build something like this - which will never see production?

I spent last July in South Korea. I got to see Kia and Hyundai's presence first hand.

I have leased an Azera and a Gnesis HTRAC fully loaded.

They have been reliable, with virtually no issues.

Hyundai and Kia have basically shown that what people want is German-Looks at Honda prices.

All they need to do is to keep doing what they do best: put more luxury-level tech in economy-level cars.