Linux is getting a BSOD that might actually be helpful

Daniel Sims

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Forward-looking: The blue screen of death has long been one of the most notorious aspects of Windows. Critics often cite it as a symbol of the operating system's uniquely unstable nature. However, a recent update introduces the possibility of a BSOD to certain Linux systems as well. Fortunately, the Linux edition may offer more assistance to users in resolving whatever problem triggered it.

The latest version of systemd, a software suite that provides backend services for Linux operating systems, has introduced the capability to display a BSOD upon boot failure. The update also incorporates numerous other changes.

In Version 255, a "system-bsod" can be displayed upon reaching a LOG_EMERG log level, resembling the infamous Windows system failure screen. According to Phoronix, this feature emerged from the Outreachy 2023 event. The developers note that the functionality is still experimental and may undergo significant changes.

Similar to the BSOD in recent versions of Windows, systemd's new error screen presents a QR code that users can scan to learn more about the issue. Additionally, it displays logged error messages in full-screen, providing experienced users or technicians with more information about potential problems.

Additionally, the new systemd version brings about significant changes to TMP2 support, disk encryption, disk authorization, the boot process, device and network management, hibernation, and other features. The update also overhauls the way services are spawned.

Microsoft introduced the now-infamous BSOD with Windows NT 3.1 in 1993, and it has since remained one of the most feared aspects of the OS. In 2016, the company added QR codes to BSODs from Windows 10 onward. However, the codes initially led to generic help pages containing no information about the specific offending error.

The systemd update isn't the first time this year that Linux has utilized a BSOD. In May, NTDEV released a utility that can boot from Windows into Linux after the former suffers a BSOD, enabling users to continue working and hopefully retrieve data before restarting Windows.

The development of systemd began in 2010, and it has since become one of the most popular Linux software suites. Distributions like Arch Linux, Debian, and Ubuntu enable it by default, so the new BSOD could soon gain wide adoption among Linux users.

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Boy, this article sounds like it was written by a Linux fanboy.

Other than that one time about three months ago where an nVidia driver did something the kernel didn't like, I can't remember the last time I saw a BSOD. My system has been stable and dependable.
 
Boy, this article sounds like it was written by a Linux fanboy.

Other than that one time about three months ago where an nVidia driver did something the kernel didn't like, I can't remember the last time I saw a BSOD. My system has been stable and dependable.

same.. win10 21h2 has been a tank
 
Boy, this article sounds like it was written by a Linux fanboy.

Other than that one time about three months ago where an nVidia driver did something the kernel didn't like, I can't remember the last time I saw a BSOD. My system has been stable and dependable.


I got tired of all the baked-in ads and data collection. Unless they’re playing certain DRM-riddled games or running some other ultra obscure software, I can’t understand how people who have the knowledge to DIY willingly subject themselves to Windows anymore.
 
We know linux is good and all the things but right now it's still "harder" to learn and run than a windows for the common dude and until it become as simple as windows, its "market share" will never grow as big as windows
 
We know linux is good and all the things but right now it's still "harder" to learn and run than a windows for the common dude and until it become as simple as windows, its "market share" will never grow as big as windows

It’s less an issue of “simplicity” and more like Microsoft’s stranglehold on the prebuilt market. Many distros are arguably far “simpler” than Windows (Mint and Debian immediately come to mind). Especially given that most everything is now a hosted service, most tasks are accomplished in a web browser nowadays.
 
I've never seen the Linux version of the "BSOD". I've seen the kernel-panic screen, rarely..
 
I've only been a full time Linux user for a year now and haven't experienced any crashes or serious issues whatsoever. This is a welcome addition though, when things do go wrong it'll be incredibly helpful to know why.

I have had issues historically though, as I've dabbled in Linux off and on for nearly two decades. Most of the issues I've had were setting up Linux on new hardware, once I've had all the hardware properly recognized I've rarely had a serious issue that wasn't directly my fault.

That's not to say plenty of people haven't had serious issues with Linux. It's probably much more common (per capita) than on Windows, but I have to assume a lot of it is user error since Linux doesn't treat you like a child, you're free to mess around with whatever you like (for better or worse).
 
I got tired of all the baked-in ads and data collection. Unless they’re playing certain DRM-riddled games or running some other ultra obscure software, I can’t understand how people who have the knowledge to DIY willingly subject themselves to Windows anymore.
Because a lot of my software is Windows only. If I had to switch to another OS, it would probably be to the Mac.
 
It’s less an issue of “simplicity” and more like Microsoft’s stranglehold on the prebuilt market. Many distros are arguably far “simpler” than Windows (Mint and Debian immediately come to mind). Especially given that most everything is now a hosted service, most tasks are accomplished in a web browser nowadays.
It's not a stranglehold on the pre-built market, or rather that the stranglehold is the result of something else. Microsoft and other software companies, most notably Adobe and Intuit, hav a stranglehold on the SOFTWARE that people use, and the software just happens to run only on Windows. And please! Let's not get into how easy it is for the run-of-the-mill non-tech computer owner to move from Windows to Linux.
 
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