Micron lays claim to the world's largest microSD card at 1.5TB

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,237   +158
Staff member
In brief: Micron has introduced what it claims is the largest capacity microSD card in the world. The i400 series microSD line is offered in densities of 64GB, 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB and a monstrous 1.5TB. The cards were designed for edge storage applications with a focus on handling tasks like continuous video recording or multiple AI capture events concurrently.

All i400 cards are rated for 24/7 operation for up to five years straight with a mean time between failure of two million hours. They can also function in environments between -25 degrees Celsius and 85 degrees Celsius, and can protect against damage from water, magnets, x-rays, impacts and shock.

According to Micron, the 1.5TB card can store up to four months of video footage.

The i400 series utilizes Micron's 176-layer 3D NAND, which was introduced in late 2020. At the time, the company said its layer count was nearly 40 percent higher than its nearest competitor and was ideal for small form factor solutions.

Micron said the cards will facilitate the storage of data at the edge, where it is created, for actionable real-time insights. They could also allow small businesses to reduce the need for continuous data uploads to the cloud which can be costly, especially from remote locations like cargo ships or oil rigs.

Micron's new i400 cards are now sampling to customers.

Image credit: cottonbro

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Bluescreendeath

Posts: 293   +412
At what resolution? that statement means nothing without context.

By my calculations, it's a custom resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p, specifically slightly above 720p.

4 months is 175,200 minutes. 480p videos take up 2 MB per minute. At 480p, 4 months of continuous footage would be 350400 MB, which is 350.4 GB, or 0.35 TB. Since 1.5 TB is ~4.286x 0.35 TB, then the video must be 4.286x the space of 480p...or ~8.57 MB per minute. 720p comes in at 5MB per minute, while 1080p comes in at 20MB per minute. So the 4 months of continuous footage would be for resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p.
 

NumberSix

Posts: 147   +200
By my calculations, it's a custom resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p, specifically slightly above 720p.

4 months is 175,200 minutes. 480p videos take up 2 MB per minute. At 480p, 4 months of continuous footage would be 350400 MB, which is 350.4 GB, or 0.35 TB. Since 1.5 TB is ~4.286x 0.35 TB, then the video must be 4.286x the space of 480p...or ~8.57 MB per minute. 720p comes in at 5MB per minute, while 1080p comes in at 20MB per minute. So the 4 months of continuous footage would be for resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p.

My Eufycam 2 is 1080p and uses 6.6MB per minute (with audio).
 

Kotters

Posts: 387   +288
By my calculations, it's a custom resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p, specifically slightly above 720p.

4 months is 175,200 minutes. 480p videos take up 2 MB per minute. At 480p, 4 months of continuous footage would be 350400 MB, which is 350.4 GB, or 0.35 TB. Since 1.5 TB is ~4.286x 0.35 TB, then the video must be 4.286x the space of 480p...or ~8.57 MB per minute. 720p comes in at 5MB per minute, while 1080p comes in at 20MB per minute. So the 4 months of continuous footage would be for resolution that falls somewhere between 720p and 1080p.
With what codec? What crf? Or are you using cbr?
 

nismo91

Posts: 1,223   +271
Did some math.... first off, 4 months is considered 2920 hours.

1,500,000,000,000 Bytes (or what they called 1.5TB im sure) is equivalent to:
1.364TB or 1396GB or 1,430,500MB.

divide that by hours you will get video size of 489MB / hour.

based on my video collections, that size is only good for one hour long 720p H.264 videos or one hour long 1080p H.265 videos with medium compression. and remember those files are at 24-25fps.

I think in short it's safe to say up to 4 months of videos applies for 720p videos.

anyway it's nice to see 1.5TB at the size of fingernail, but I wonder if existing card readers will no have no problem handling all that storage... sometimes the controller supports such size but when we copy so many files the reader gets hot and unstable.
 

LuxZg

Posts: 7   +4
The price will probably be through the roof, despite the minimal actual cost of production and materials. So, too bad. Otherwise this should be cheaper than a 2TB 5400 rpm SATA HDD. And for my personal "archival" purposes, I would prefer having 10 microSD cards vs 7-8 HDDs. Plus this fits in a pocket, together with card reader in a dedicated mini-case. Perfect for having terabytes of personal stuff always at hand.

Speed is probably OK-ish as picture shows U3 simbol, so about half of 5400rpm drive.