New battery tech could finally improve EV performance in extreme weather

DragonSlayer101

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In context: Freezing winter temperatures slow the chemical reactions in EV batteries, increasing charging times and reducing the charge the lithium-ion cells can hold. Extremely hot days can harm EV performance, too, as high ambient temperatures can also reduce driving range significantly. However, researchers are now tackling these problems head-on and working on multiple strategies to make batteries more weather-resilient.

One method to improve charging times in frigid weather is to improve the electrolytes to simultaneously have high ionic conductivity, low solvation energy and low melting point, and form an anion-derived inorganic interphase. A team of researchers led by Xiulin Fan, a professor at China's Zhejiang University, has just published a paper in Nature magazine, detailing exactly how that can be done in a move that could have far-reaching consequences in making EVs more practical in extreme weather.

According to the researchers, one of the best ways to improve electrolyte quality is to use small-sized solvents with low solvation energy that could change the way lithium ions move in the electrolyte, increasing the conductivity and facilitating faster charging. To do that, the researchers used a solvent called fluoroacetonitrile (FAN), which they say enables lithium-ion batteries to simultaneously achieve high energy density, fast charging and a wide operating temperature range.

It is worth noting that this is not the first time that researchers have tried to tackle the problems metal-ion batteries have in extreme weather. A couple of years ago, Zheng Chen, a materials scientist and engineer at the University of California, San Diego, and his colleagues published a paper, describing a new type of electrolyte that they claimed worked better than the current solutions in extreme weather, ranging from a freezing -40F (-40C) to a scalding 122F (50C).

EVs are getting increasingly popular in recent years, but the vast majority of car buyers are still opting for traditional ICE (internal combustion engine) vehicles for a variety of reasons. Most of the traditionalists cite the long charging times as a major reason for their decision to avoid EVs, but horror stories about malfunctioning cars in inclement weather aren't helping the transition either.

While the aforementioned research regarding new electrolytes is a huge positive for the EV industry as a whole, companies like Tesla and Rivian will be hoping that they will be practical enough to be implemented in real-world EV batteries in the near future. If that happens, it is sure to improve battery stamina and reduce charging speeds in extreme weather, making EVs more practical in frigid conditions than they have ever been.

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It's not a myth, unless you're trying to say all those drivers stranded in Chicago during the cold snap were fake news. Batteries SUCK in cold weather right now.
 
I live in Canada where it can reach -40C/-40F and I would love to own an EV. To me, the main hestiation isn't range, it's initial cost of purchase. They are too expensive to switch to. Most drivers in all honesty unless they live in the country, only drive 30-40km / 18.5-25mi per day to drive to work and back. An EV would suit an everyday scenario. Longer journey's, yes, ICE is still the way to go.
 
After a while, you kind of just get used to the false rumors and complainers.
It happens with towing\hauling too. We have all seen the towing range results of an EV.
What gets ignored is the towing fuel mileage of a smoke pump.
My own Ram 2500 averages 16.8 MPG in everyday driving, but when towing around some heavy equipment and hauling materials (5-6k lb. loads), that drops to just over 10 MPG. A typical drop of 40% +\-.
 
It's not a myth, unless you're trying to say all those drivers stranded in Chicago during the cold snap were fake news. Batteries SUCK in cold weather right now.
Are you speaking from personal experience? Or are those articles another case of TL;DR for you?

Are you so mis-informed that you have not heard that a part of the problem in Chicago was the chargers themselves?

Here's another article for you to claim TL;DR https://www.autoblog.com/2024/01/17...hicago-cold-no-it-wasnt-entirely-their-fault/
 
I figured I would toss this in for the bonus cost analysis. Just for the skirts.


"A truck that normally gets 15 miles per gallon, but only gets 8 miles per gallon while towing will consume an additional 17.5 gallons of fuel for a 300-mile round-trip. If fuel prices are $2.50 a gallon, they’ll end up spending an additional $43.50."
 
As a whole and not just EV, when the next groundbreaking battery/portable power tech comes out, that is when we will see then next leap in technology. When companies no longer have to take into consideration battery life, battery heat generation, larger battery space in their designs... It will be something to behold.
 
To do that, the researchers used a solvent called fluoroacetonitrile (FAN), which they say enables lithium-ion batteries to simultaneously achieve high energy density, fast charging and a wide operating temperature range.</p>

RGB FANs make faster EVs, take note researchers.

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this is what people insisting on horse carriages said about ICEs a century ago. but at the same time, I personally believe we shouldve pushed for hybrids first, instead of going with a deadline to go full electric.
 
this is what people insisting on horse carriages said about ICEs a century ago. but at the same time, I personally believe we shouldve pushed for hybrids first, instead of going with a deadline to go full electric.
Historically speaking, BEVs came before ICEs in that day and age. The problem was, as part of it is now, distribution of electricity. Imagine, if you will, that the market had stuck with BEVs back then. For me, its hard to imagine where battery tech would be now if the market had stuck with BEVs then. Perhaps battery tech would be a century, or more, beyond where it is now.
 
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