Noctua's massive 3.3-pound NH-P1 fanless cooler arrives with $100 price

midian182

Posts: 6,920   +62
Staff member
In a nutshell: Two years after it was first unveiled, Noctua's enormous, 1.5kg (3.3 pound) passive heatsink looks set for an imminent launch announcement after a listing for the cooler revealed its $100 price tag.

We first saw Noctua's "Fanless CPU Cooler" back at the pre-pandemic Computex 2019. The company gave a vague launch date of 2020, but, possibly due to Covid-19, it didn't go into mass production until December last year.

Now, Fanless Tech has highlighted a listing for the NH-P1 on Newegg. It's currently "Out of Stock," but it was shown with a $100 price earlier today.

The NH-P1 features twelve 1.5mm aluminum fins, six copper heatpipes, and a copper heatsink. According to Noctua, it uses an asymmetric design for better PCIe clearance and is 100 percent RAM compatible on LGA1200/115x and AM4 motherboards.

Also read: The Science of Keeping It Cool

The cooler was demonstrated on an Intel Core i9-9900K back at Computex—an eight-core chip that can reach 5GHz and has a TDP of 95W. The listing's description recommends it be used with CPUs with low to moderate heat dissipation, including "the 9900K, 9700K, or AMD Ryzen 2700X, 3950X 3700X, 3400G."

Image: Fanless Tech

The cooler is not recommended for overclocking, and Noctua advises that a system's ambient temperature and components can affect the amount of heat dissipation the NH-P1 can handle. The company doesn't give a general TDP specification but refers consumers to the CPU compatibility list that will arrive with the official launch. Noctua recommends pairing the cooler with an ultra-quiet fan, such as its NF-A12x25 LS-PWM, for extra performance.

The cooler uses Noctua's Torx-based SecuFirm2+ mounting system, which is compatible with Intel's LGA115x, LGA1200, and LGA1200xx sockets and AMD's AM4, AM3(+), AM2(+), FM2(+), and FM1 sockets. Buyers also get a tube of second-generation NT-H2 thermal compound with the NH-P1, along with a six-year warranty.

Permalink to story.

 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 5,037   +5,643
Better to buy an aggressive AIO. This is too bulky for many cases and kills the aesthetic for many others.

I've seen some passive radiator designs and they are usually big, bulky and heavy.
 
Last edited:

envirovore

Posts: 216   +483
TechSpot Elite
Is that weight good for mainboards long term ?

Had that same thought myself.
I just installed a Fuma 2 cooler last week, and that thing itself is pretty hefty. Can't imagine putting a much larger on.
Maybe fine if you lay the box on it's back. Still going to need a massive case.
 

Wrinkle

Posts: 58   +42
Is that weight good for mainboards long term ?
I've got a Thermaltake cooler that weighs 2.7 pounds. The motherboard itself is fine, the weight is mostly distributed through the mounting system. I've used it on a cheap MSI and a high end Asus motherboard.

Actually my mental wellness suffers more than my PC when I move it around since I'm afraid it might break or come off (which it hasn't in 3.5 years).
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 721   +1,299
My guess is that a 5600x stock should be just about ok if the case is open air or has proper ventilation to help the cooler. Sounds good but I'll need to look at it's size: sometimes a smaller cooler and a fan would work out a lot better for most cases that don't have the rare combo of

1) Good silence characteristics (Otherwise it becomes pointless
2) Good size without being unnecessarily large
3) Good airflow sufficient enough to keep up with reasonable hardware requirements

I think there will be very few cases in which this will all come together but I'll wait for reviews of course.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,979   +5,753
Those only goes to prove that modern computer component companies, will dump whatever junk on the market they think they can get away with selling.

Noctua has such a fine reputation, for performance and workmanship, it's a shame to gamble it on that monstrosity.

You would need more cabinet airflow to keep that thing running cool. More airflow means noisier fans, and you're back where you started.

I honestly don't get gamer types. My impression is that they sit there with 7 channel closed back headphones, ruining their hearing @110 DB, and they're still whining about "CPU cooler fan noise"..
 

Skjorn

Posts: 604   +463
Better to buy an aggressive AIO. This is too bulky for many cases and kills the aesthetic for many others.

I've seen some passive radiator designs and they are usually big, bulky and heavy.
Yeah let's go from passive with no fans to a cheaply made aio with fans and a pump that make noise. That'll get the passive/low noise crowd to buy.
Those only goes to prove that modern computer component companies, will dump whatever junk on the market they think they can get away with selling.

Noctua has such a fine reputation, for performance and workmanship, it's a shame to gamble it on that monstrosity.

You would need more cabinet airflow to keep that thing running cool. More airflow means noisier fans, and you're back where you started.

I honestly don't get gamer types. My impression is that they sit there with 7 channel closed back headphones, ruining their hearing @110 DB, and they're still whining about "CPU cooler fan noise"..
Nobody listening to anything that loud on closed backs is complaining about their fans.
It's for the passive crowd. It will run hotter than a cooler with fans. You called them a modern computer company.. they're a cooling company. That's it. They sell coolers and fans. They don't dump a lot junk products out. Yell at the clouds much lately?
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,979   +5,753
Nobody listening to anything that loud on closed backs is complaining about their fans.
It's for the passive crowd. It will run hotter than a cooler with fans. You called them a modern computer company.. they're a cooling company. That's it. They sell coolers and fans. They don't dump a lot junk products out. Yell at the clouds much lately?
The average fan air cooler weighs and applies about 1 1/2 times the recommended torsional stress on any motherboard. (At least that's the way it was, last time I encountered any info on the topic).
In this case, I find it reasonable to imagine rotating the mobo to horizontal, and designing cases specifically around this solution. The HT crowd would likely complain in this instance as well, due to the enlarged footprint.

So, instead of "yelling at the clouds", how about if we get together and sing the "Colace Jingle"?


Envision it as trying to pass this gem through your "waste output port".

BTW, I always "yell at the clouds". That's because my 2 x 8" home towers are turned up loud enough to kill the noise from the window air conditioner, (My Noctua's 120 mm cooler fan doesn't even enter into the equation). I have to yell, otherwise they (the clouds) won't hear me. :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

ZedRM

Posts: 534   +326
Better to buy an aggressive AIO. This is too bulky for many cases and kills the aesthetic for many others.

I've seen some passive radiator designs and they are usually big, bulky and heavy.
That might not be a valid option in some cases where silent cooling is needed and room for a rad doesn't exist.
 

koblongata

Posts: 420   +231
Was planning to hide my new rig in the ceiling like 10 meters away, and use optical HDMI and USB hub extender to connect to TV and peripherals, but after I put together the new rig with 3090SuprimX, Noctua NH-D15 along with a 1200W power supply, they seem to be quiet enough, almost silent in fact, I gave up the project. That said still would love to have NH P1 in the future, easier to clean I suppose, hope it will come in black.
 
Last edited:

Rdmetz

Posts: 241   +117
Was planning to hide my new rig in the ceiling like 10 meters away, and use optical HDMI and USB hub extender to connect to TV and peripherals, but after I put together the new rig with 3090SuprimX, Noctua NH-D15 along with a 1200W power supply, they seem to be quiet enough, almost silent in fact, I gave up the project. That said still would love to have NH P1 in the future, easier to clean I suppose, hope it will come in black.


Quiet enough doesn't negate the heat output. Whether you can hear it or not likley dumping tons of extra heat into your gaming area.

I've had to compensate for all the extra heat in my modern fully central air conditioned home by adding a secondary in wall cooling unit to keep my "den" at a reasonable temperature without making the rest of the house freezing.

Moving the heat to a non personal space has also been a idea I've wanted to explore.

But for now this works and my a/c is quiet enough to not be picked up on mic (and if could I've got rtx voice making sure it doesn't).
 

koblongata

Posts: 420   +231
Quiet enough doesn't negate the heat output. Whether you can hear it or not likley dumping tons of extra heat into your gaming area.

I've had to compensate for all the extra heat in my modern fully central air conditioned home by adding a secondary in wall cooling unit to keep my "den" at a reasonable temperature without making the rest of the house freezing.

Moving the heat to a non personal space has also been a idea I've wanted to explore.

But for now this works and my a/c is quiet enough to not be picked up on mic (and if could I've got rtx voice making sure it doesn't).
Riiight... it was winter and pretty cozy, getting hot indeed.