Razer unveils the Lancehead wireless gaming mouse

Cal Jeffrey

Posts: 3,463   +1,034
Staff member

Today Razer is announcing its newest gaming mouse, the Lancehead. The wireless mouse is designed for gaming and is described to be “tournament-grade,” thanks to proprietary “Adaptive Frequency Technology” that enables cordless lag-free operation. It also features a highly precise laser sensor, both onboard and cloud memory, and an ambidextrous design for left or right-hand use.

Razer’s AFT is a frequency-switching technology that keeps the mouse connected to the strongest and most interference-free 2.4GHz signal available. If the link gets sketchy, the Lancehead will switch to a better signal automatically. The company claims that this will prevent lag between the mouse and the PC better than any other wireless mouse currently available.

The 5G laser sensor in the Razer Lancehead offers 16,000 DPI, 210 inches-per-second (IPS) tracking and 50 G acceleration. Of course, gamers will rarely -- if ever -- use it at peak sensitivity, so you'll be able to tweak these settings to your preferences using Razer's accompanying software.

Speaking of which, the Lancehead is the first Razer device running on the soon-to-be released Razer Synapse Pro (currently on beta). Combined with the included on-board storage, Synapse Pro will be able to save your settings directly to the mouse, as well as to the cloud -- addressing a common complaint with Razer's latest mice, which relied exclusively on cloud storage.

Razer appears to be using the same mechanical switches found on the DeathAdder Elite -- a TechSpot favorite. Designed in cooperation with switch manufacturer Omron, they are optimized for fast response times and should be durable for 50 million clicks. Razer also included two additional buttons below the scroll wheel to allow on the fly DPI switching even while playing.

A second version of the mouse called the Razer Lancehead Tournament Edition (TE) was also announced. The TE is a wired variant of the Lancehead that boasts all of the same features but uses an optical sensor instead of laser, and bumps the responsiveness to 450 IPS. Other than that and the wireless functionality, the two versions of the Lancehead are the same.

Razer has long been known for aesthetically pleasing device designs, and the Lancehead is no different. From the iconic backlit Razer logo on the top surface of the mouse to the multicolored glowing racing stripe down the side, the Lancehead looks slick. Often devices with decorative backlighting have ridiculously short battery life, but Razer says that even with the lighting the Lancehead should have 24 hours of battery life. Of course, battery life is also dependent on usage settings.

The Razer Lancehead TE should be available in the U.S. today at the company’s website for $79.99.

Pre-orders for the Razer Lancehead wireless gaming mouse also start today for $139.99, with availability set for mid-May. Those interested in getting in on the Razer Synapse Pro beta should register their mouse on the company’s Synapse Pro page.

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davislane1

Might have to pick this up. Currently using a DeathAdder, but need more buttons.
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,289
At 140 bucks, just 'tournament-grade' doesn't do it for me, I need to see at least 'aircraft-grade aluminium' printed on the box as well. If it's not full of meaningless marketing fluff then who's going to buy it? That said, I haven't met a Razer product that I've cared much for, and I've used a few, and even owned one of them.
 
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davislane1

That said, I haven't met a Razer product that I've cared much for, and I've used a few, and even owned one of them.

Peripherals are all about the specific end user. My brother has the top-end gaming stuff from Logitech (mechanical keyboard and gaming mouse). I used his computer a few times and it was all very "meh." Purchased some Razer stuff for myself and never gave Logitech a second glance. He tried out the Razer stuff (Blackwidow and DeathAdder) and, surprise surprise, "meh" was his reaction.

Always have to go with what feels best with these things.
 
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davislane1

me too, im picking this up ASAP I need 47 more buttons, a touchscreen and water cooling

Sounds like you're after a G600 attached to a waterproof 2-in-1 resting in a puddle of iced coffee..
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,289
Peripherals are all about the specific end user. My brother has the top-end gaming stuff from Logitech (mechanical keyboard and gaming mouse). I used his computer a few times and it was all very "meh." Purchased some Razer stuff for myself and never gave Logitech a second glance. He tried out the Razer stuff (Blackwidow and DeathAdder) and, surprise surprise, "meh" was his reaction.

Always have to go with what feels best with these things.
Just as you stated, "it's all about personal preference" when it comes to peripherals and I couldn't agree more. For me it's Roccat mice and not all of them, just the Kone series but Logitech has the best software of everyone as far as I'm concerned. Most of their peripherals aren't bad either, they'd probably be my 2nd choice. Corsair mice don't feature on my list, to me they're the most uncomfortable but their keyboards are fine, they're just too expensive. Naturally everything I stated here is just my opinion.
 

rvnwlfdroid

Posts: 193   +49
I'll stick with my Logitech M570 track ball. I've been using that design of trackball for more than 20 years. It may not be in the same league as this gaming mouse but it plays very well while I'm sitting on my couch.
 

Someone8MyPosts

Posts: 459   +141
Bought a DeathAdder once. Worst mouse I've ever had. Seemed OK, until the switch broke...they wouldn't sell me a switch or even give me one. This was less than a year of having it. I've never had a mouse break no me yet, except that one.