Recent Windows 10 updates failing to install, causing BSOD and audio issues for some users

midian182

Posts: 6,083   +50
Staff member
Facepalm: Are you having problems installing the Windows 10 August 2020 security update? Maybe you’ve found it’s causing Blue Screen of Death messages and sound issues? If any of this sounds familiar, you’re not alone.

System issues and errors have become par for the course with Windows 10 updates, and the Windows 10 KB4565351 and KB4566782—for machines running the November 2019 Update (1909) and May 2020 Update (version 2004)—are no exception.

As reported by Windows Latest, it seems that not being able to install the updates is the problem most people are encountering, with 0x800f081f being the most-common error code. This usually relates to missing files in the WinSXS folder.

One Reddit user wrote: “Using Windows Update, the upgrade downloads, installs slowly to around 44%, then jumps to 100% installing, then provides the following error: "There were some problems installing updates, but we'll try again later. If you keep seeing this and want to search the web or contact support for information, this may help: (0x800f081f)"

“I've tried it four or five times since yesterday, all with the same result.”

Even when the updates do install without any hitches, some users have found they’ve introduced bugs to the system, including sound problems and the dreaded Blue Screen of Death. “I'm running 1903 and just got the KB4569751 update forced on me last night. I wake up today and my sound has stopped working,” wrote a another Redditor. “I'm running an audio interface (id14) to power external speaker monitors. In the interface software I can see that I'm straight up receiving no signal from Windows whatsoever.”

If you’re concerned about the updates, you can always pause them for a while until Microsoft (hopefully) irons out the bugs. You can do this by going to Settings > Update and Security > Windows Update > Pause updates.

As with all Windows 10 update issues, not every user is experiencing them. The KB4565351 update was installed on my PC yesterday, and I’ve not found any problems—yet.

Image credit: wavebreakmedia

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 3,529   +3,363
The last windows update (months ago) started giving me BSOD issues.

I thought it might have been a hardware change causing it like my X45, Logitech G pedals or my new 3.0 USB pcie card... but I later unplugged them and got the same issues.

I'd have the computer on, listening to Youtube and the damn thing would just crash for no good reason.

Up till recently, I'd had 0 issues with Windows 10.

I think the most recent update has ironed out my problems. I haven't had any idle crashes recently.
 

psycros

Posts: 3,204   +3,400
Recent updates have created a second audio input device. I have to constantly go in and screw with audio settings to try and trick Windows into using the real mic device..it won't let you pick the real one as the default.
 

DjoCoeur

Posts: 25   +13
Recent updates have created a second audio input device. I have to constantly go in and screw with audio settings to try and trick Windows into using the real mic device..it won't let you pick the real one as the default.
You possibly have an integrated audio device to turn off in the BIOS
 

texasrattler

Posts: 988   +433
No issue here. I had to replace my mobo recently and basically started all over. Had 2004 but got new drive, reloaded windows and it put 1903 on. For a weeks it wouldnt update past that. So I waited a few weeks cause I had to do some other stuff to the computer n when I turned it back on, windows updated to 1909. Just waiting for 2004 update.
No issues currently nor did I had any with 2004.
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 199   +204
Since the last update, my system becomes massively unstable after sitting idle for more than 30 minutes. I get super high CPU utilization for a couple minutes while it attempts to recover with system interrupts and audio issues. Probably didn't help that I got a blue screen while installing the latest Windows build. Great work Microsoft. Remember when you use to pay for testers rather than have your testers (us) pay.
 
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OneSpeed

Posts: 407   +200
My BSOD issues came from the 2004 Release. I'm back to the 1909 and have not experienced any issues with the latest updates.
 

Lionvibez

Posts: 2,005   +1,336
I guess I'm lucky I've not had a single issues with windows update since I built my Ryzen Rig in Dec 2019. Never had to roll back a patch ever. Granted I'm still on build 1909 but ya nothing.
 

JW0914

Posts: 35   +20
@midian182 What's the point of writing this article if not also listing the simple fix?

Due to this site's corrupted BB code implementation, which does not function as it should for monospaced code or fonts, lists, indents, or line breaks, the steps will all be inside a code box
Bash:
# The Component Store [%WinDir%\WinSxS] maintains a backup copy of all Windows
# system files and the following sequence must be followed in the order below
# due to what each step does, with each step relying on the one before it:
Bash:
# 1.  The Component Store should always be cleaned prior to a bi-annual update,
      # or after an issue with Windows Update, and at least once a month; it
      # becomes dirty over time from updates occasionally breaking hard links
      Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup
Bash:
# 2.  This requires an internet connection, else the offline method will be
      # required and may not correct the issue
        # Verify and, if found, fix any corruption in the Component Store by
        # verifying against known good copies from the Windows Update servers
        Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

      # OFFLINE: Windows install ISO install.wim for current version installed:
        # Index for the installed OS must be garnished from the install.wim:
        Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:Z:\path\to\install.wim

        # Specify the index number at the end of the /Source parameter:
        Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:wim:Z:\path\to\install.wim:6 /LimitAccess
Bash:
# 3.  Reboot, and if errors are found, review %WinDir%\Logs\DISM\dism.log
      # starting from the bottom up:
        # SFC relies upon Dism /RestoreHealth and is why it should always be
        # run prior to SFC
Bash:
# 4.  Verify and, if found, fix any corruption in %WinDir%:
      SFC /ScanNow

      # SFC always assumes the Component Store is not corrupted, comparing
      # all system files against known good backups contained within the
      # Component Store and why Dism /RestoreHealth should be run prior to SFC
        # Not doing so allows a corrupted Component Store to replace a good
        # system file with a corrupted one from within the Component Store due
        # to a hash mismatch
Bash:
# 5.  Reboot, and if errors were found, review %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log,
      # starting from the bottom up
 
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JW0914

Posts: 35   +20
Nothing new. Updates are the main cause of windows problems.
Just another day with Windows Update forced automated service.
  1. It's fundamentally and literally impossible for Microsoft to test an update against billions of devices to ensure their hardware configurations won't result in a bug. Billions of devices with likely over 100 billion possible hardware combinations.

  2. The other issue is a normal issue that can occur on any install and I listed the steps to fix four comments up from yours here
 

JW0914

Posts: 35   +20
"if it ain't broke, don't fix it" old red neck philosophy... good to remember before you update windows.
This perspective lacks common sense... not updating a device with security patches is unwise. Once a Windows security patch is publicly available, it shows exactly how to exploit affected OS versions, which is why it's not recommended to use Windows XP, Vista, or 7.
 

lazer

Posts: 354   +103
  1. It's fundamentally and literally impossible for Microsoft to test an update against billions of devices to ensure their hardware configurations won't result in a bug. Billions of devices with likely over 100 billion possible hardware combinations.

  2. The other issue is a normal issue that can occur on any install and I listed the steps to fix four comments up from yours here
  1. It's fundamentally and literally impossible for Microsoft to test an update against billions of devices to ensure their hardware configurations won't result in a bug. Billions of devices with likely over 100 billion possible hardware combinations.

  2. The other issue is a normal issue that can occur on any install and I listed the steps to fix four comments up from yours here
SO, how does Android and Apple seem to make seem-less upgrades with out killing devices?
The answer is that MicroSlop is a company that is a sales first company and tech later, whereas Apple and Android are tech first companies and damn good tech companies and they can do things right the first time.
 
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JW0914

Posts: 35   +20
SO, how does Android and Apple seem to make seem-less upgrades with out killing devices?
The answer is that MicroSlop is a company that is a sales first company and tech later, whereas Apple and Android are tech first companies and damn good tech companies and they can do things right the first time.
Apple controls their hardware ecosystem, developing their OS specifically, and only, for their hardware.

Android has the direct opposite issue - little to no security patches or updates due to manufacturers and carriers (budget devices are an almost certainty to never receive an update, mid-range devices have a 50/50 chance, and high-end devices will likely see at least one, likely more).

Unlike Windows, which ships with hundreds of generic drivers and thousands available via the Windows Update servers, Android is tailored specifically to the device it's installed on (e.g. a system image from one device will not work on a different device model or brand), and Android hardware OEMs, coupled with carriers, place little effort into maintaining the devices with security patches and updates.

This is not new, as most consumer routers fall into this category as well, with the vast majority of consumer routers never receiving an update and many are even shipped with exploitable code - one reason why it's always recommended to buy a router that's supported by opensource firmware, such as OpenWrt, especially when 95%+ of OEMs only support a consumer router for 1yr, after which they consider it EoL [End of Life]. This is also the same exact reasoning why it's recommended to buy bootloader unlockable phones/tablets, which allow flashing opensource firmware that's up-to-date, such as Lineage OS, as, like with routers, the majority of devices are considered EoL after ~2yrs.
 
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