Samsung's first PCIe 3.0 SSD enters mass production, it's insanely fast and energy efficient

Jos

Posts: 3,073   +97
Samsung has announced their new crazy-fast and energy efficient PCIe SSD is now in mass production. Dubbed SM951, the drive is destined to go in ultra thin and light laptops, and when matched with devices that support PCIe 3.0 it...

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Evernessince

Posts: 5,464   +6,145
Wow, that's fast. I can only wonder what kind of experience it would be to run windows off of that thing.
 

EEatGDL

Posts: 762   +484
Since when do early adopters pay reasonable prices? They may think they're getting a fair deal but in actual fact they're being scammed.

Can you give more details about why you consider it "scam" for early adopters? R+D costs a lot of money and the early adopters are always a few; when there's nothing else on the market that offers what you just developed, investors can ask for a "as high as possible price" since there's no competition and have as much as possible of the investment back early.

That's the basic business principle that allowed the CDC 6600 to be sold at $8 million a piece -considered a supercomputer capable of running 10 times as fast as the other most powerful machines.
 

amstech

Posts: 2,643   +1,807
This is why I don't waste time putting SSD's in RAID.
"Well Joe my PC takes 5.67 seconds to boot instead of 7.28, whoop-de-do."

A good SSD is plenty fast and this setup looks to excel in total pwnage.
 

Puiu

Posts: 4,478   +3,315
TechSpot Elite
Wow, that's fast. I can only wonder what kind of experience it would be to run windows off of that thing.
the same as an above average SSD. it will just load a bit faster and copy files a bit faster. you are still limited by the rest of the components. (especially in mobile formats)
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,289
Can you give more details about why you consider it "scam" for early adopters? R+D costs a lot of money and the early adopters are always a few; when there's nothing else on the market that offers what you just developed, investors can ask for a "as high as possible price" since there's no competition and have as much as possible of the investment back early.

That's the basic business principle that allowed the CDC 6600 to be sold at $8 million a piece -considered a supercomputer capable of running 10 times as fast as the other most powerful machines.
OK, I don't see any reason to pay top dollar for any new tech when I can pick up a vastly improved version for a fraction of the original cost later on. I'm patient, I can wait.
 

EEatGDL

Posts: 762   +484
OK, I don't see any reason to pay top dollar for any new tech when I can pick up a vastly improved version for a fraction of the original cost later on. I'm patient, I can wait.

Well, that's the reason why early adopters are so few and the big chunk of "mainstream-stage" adopters wait; that's expected. Those few who had that need beforehand and are able to pay it, will do.

I'm not an early adopter and I agree with you; but I can also see the reason of why it works that way and they take advantage of that temporary "edginess".
 

VitalyT

Posts: 5,483   +5,073
Wow, that's fast. I can only wonder what kind of experience it would be to run windows off of that thing.

The same as it is now. OS itself doesn't require such speeds at all. I run Windows 8.1 on Samsung Pro 850, with i7-4770K, and everything opens instantly. Those speeds will only be of benefit under heavy load tasks, such as large file transfers, databases, video rendering, virtual machines, etc.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,001   +6,775
Since when do early adopters pay reasonable prices? They may think they're getting a fair deal but in actual fact they're being scammed.

Can you give more details about why you consider it "scam" for early adopters? R+D costs a lot of money and the early adopters are always a few; when there's nothing else on the market that offers what you just developed, investors can ask for a "as high as possible price" since there's no competition and have as much as possible of the investment back early.

That's the basic business principle that allowed the CDC 6600 to be sold at $8 million a piece -considered a supercomputer capable of running 10 times as fast as the other most powerful machines.


I have often wondered who established the time table of trying to re-coop R&D costs within the first 3-6 months on products who's significance insures a much longer lifespan. Granted that with drug companies there are so many pitfalls it has to be a priority but in computer parts that are logically going to be out there for awhile I would certainly think it more reasonable and attractive to spread those costs out for 12-18 months.

Having just purchased my second SSD I doubt I'll be in the market for another one for a year or longer so it won't affect me particularly since all those "got to have it today" folks will have absorbed all the added costs so, in advance, thanks folks for making is much more reasonable for us retiree's!
 

Jad Chaar

Posts: 6,481   +976
Can't wait for this to make it to laptops. Let's hope Apple includes it in the upcoming refresh because I am gonna be looking for a new notebook.
 
G

Guest

I already have one of these hoopajoos, found it at a garage sell, and let me tell you it's not all its cracked up to be...just my 2 cents...
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,289
Well, that's the reason why early adopters are so few and the big chunk of "mainstream-stage" adopters wait; that's expected. Those few who had that need beforehand and are able to pay it, will do.

I'm not an early adopter and I agree with you; but I can also see the reason of why it works that way and they take advantage of that temporary "edginess".
That's very true but if we all had deep pockets I think we all would be early adopters.
 
G

Guest

I am not an early adopter but we have to thank them. As they help bring costs down in the end.
I dont have a problem paying top dollar for something unique when I have cash to splash.
 

EEatGDL

Posts: 762   +484
That's very true but if we all had deep pockets I think we all would be early adopters.

Then where would the 1% be? It's like that Sheldon's [Cooper] dream when he was a giant and everything was up to scale but he knew he was a giant because he was wearing underwear size 1 million.
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,289
I am not an early adopter but we have to thank them. As they help bring costs down in the end.
I dont have a problem paying top dollar for something unique when I have cash to splash.
Of course we need them, they're the ones that do us favours and the industry needs them as well.
 
G

Guest

Spoiler alert on that size 1m!
For some business the premium is worthwhile, possibly even for Pro-sumers. I languish on the trailing edge when everything is well debugged, mature and at very reasonable prices. Just teetering on 128gb vs 240gb SSD atm (for my 2500k system) . Keep on buying suckers