Super Nintendo World opens February 4; see the first images of Mario Kart ride

midian182

Posts: 6,648   +59
Staff member
Something to look forward to: We've been hearing about Japan's Super Nintendo World for years, but images of the park's interior have been absent—until now. In addition to a few photos of the Mario Kart attraction and the AR headsets that accompany it, an official opening date has been revealed: February 4.

Following its announcement in 2015, Universal Studios Japan broke ground on the Nintendo theme park back in June 2017. It was scheduled to open this year, but, like so many events, the pandemic scuppered those plans.

Photos of the entire park arrived last week, showing its remarkable likeness to a Mario game. Now, we get to see the inside—specifically, the Mario Kart attraction. Contrary to earlier rumors, the ride is of the on-rails variety, rather than using actual go-karts on a track.

As reported by Bloomberg's Kurumi Mori, the ride is called Kooper's Challenge and is located inside Bowser's castle. Every kart has four seats, each with its own steering wheel. One element that has been confirmed is the use of AR glasses, which is likely how riders are given at least an illusion of control—they can even collect items and throw shells at other karts, just like in the game.

"Riders set off from Bowser's castle and race through different scenes including a lava level, underwater, a spooky area, Rainbow Road and more. The course uses AR, projection mapping and other tech for immersion," Mori tweeted.

The other big news is that Super Nintendo World will open on February 4, 2021. That is a bit surprising, given Japan's number of daily Covid-19 cases has reached an all-time high, though it remains much lower than most other countries. There were 2,585 cases on November 29. And of the 148,000 cases, there have been 2,057 deaths.

While Japan is a lengthy flight away, other Super Nintendo Worlds are being constructed in the US. LA's Universal Studios Hollywood will get its version between 2021 and 2022, while Mario and friends arrive at Universal Orlando Resort in 2023.

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Theinsanegamer

Posts: 2,388   +3,469
"The other big news is that Super Nintendo World will open on February 4, 2021. That is a bit surprising, given Japan's number of daily Covid-19 cases has reached an all-time high, though it remains much lower than most other countries. There were 2,585 cases on November 29. And of the 148,000 cases, there have been 2,057 deaths."

So there have been just over 2000 deaths in a country with over 126 million people, and you think its surprising the park is opening?

Have people just totally forgotten how risk works? You're more likely to die on the transit to work FFS.
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 253   +344
"The other big news is that Super Nintendo World will open on February 4, 2021. That is a bit surprising, given Japan's number of daily Covid-19 cases has reached an all-time high, though it remains much lower than most other countries. There were 2,585 cases on November 29. And of the 148,000 cases, there have been 2,057 deaths."

So there have been just over 2000 deaths in a country with over 126 million people, and you think its surprising the park is opening?

Have people just totally forgotten how risk works? You're more likely to die on the transit to work FFS.

The almost 100% effective vaccine will be out in full force by then. Vaccinate the world and no more issues, right?
 

Tom Yum

Posts: 85   +205
"The other big news is that Super Nintendo World will open on February 4, 2021. That is a bit surprising, given Japan's number of daily Covid-19 cases has reached an all-time high, though it remains much lower than most other countries. There were 2,585 cases on November 29. And of the 148,000 cases, there have been 2,057 deaths."

So there have been just over 2000 deaths in a country with over 126 million people, and you think its surprising the park is opening?

Have people just totally forgotten how risk works? You're more likely to die on the transit to work FFS.

The difference being, your transit to work could kill you and perhaps whoever you run into. CV19 can kill anyone you contact, and their contacts, and their contacts, etc (and even if you don't die, CV19 can leave long term impacts). Don't forget those figures for Japan are despite all the measures they have put in to try and minimise transmission, it would be far worse (especially given Japan's aging population) if they let it rip. It is misleading to compare CV19 death rates to other modes of death and deduce CV19 restrictions are not required. It would be like arguing that airbags aren't required because car fatalities are at their lowest in a decade, it completely ignores that airbags are one of the things supporting the low car fatality rate.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,216
It is misleading to compare CV19 death rates to other modes of death.
Absolutely, utterly untrue. In the last month alone, more people in Japan died from suicide than the number who have died of Covid for the entire year. Suicide rates there have exploded-- because of the Covid lockdowns.

You can't judge Covid in a vacuum. Actions have consequences. Worldwide, the economic devastation, along with the surge in suicide, depression, divorce and spousal abuse, violent crime demonstrates that we must always balance the costs of a policy against its benefits. Tens of millions of young children will have chronic, perhaps permanent developmental issues from their "lost year" of social isolation.
 

Prosercunus

Posts: 310   +170
Absolutely, utterly untrue. In the last month alone, more people in Japan died from suicide than the number who have died of Covid for the entire year. Suicide rates there have exploded-- because of the Covid lockdowns.

You can't judge Covid in a vacuum. Actions have consequences. Worldwide, the economic devastation, along with the surge in suicide, depression, divorce and spousal abuse, violent crime demonstrates that we must always balance the costs of a policy against its benefits. Tens of millions of young children will have chronic, perhaps permanent developmental issues from their "lost year" of social isolation.

Yup. People have been saying this all along and everyone just browbeats them into submission with wild accusations about wanting to kill Grandma.
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 227   +227
Absolutely, utterly untrue. In the last month alone, more people in Japan died from suicide than the number who have died of Covid for the entire year. Suicide rates there have exploded-- because of the Covid lockdowns.

You can't judge Covid in a vacuum. Actions have consequences. Worldwide, the economic devastation, along with the surge in suicide, depression, divorce and spousal abuse, violent crime demonstrates that we must always balance the costs of a policy against its benefits. Tens of millions of young children will have chronic, perhaps permanent developmental issues from their "lost year" of social isolation.
So if just a few die, it's okay... what if they are people you love? What if they are people I love?
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,216
So if just a few die, it's okay... what if they are people you love? What if they are people I love?
So it's ok if just a few die of suicide, or violent crime? Or are beaten by their spouses, or have permanent developmental issues? Or any of the other risks which lockdowns have intensified? What if it's your sibling, or your child?

Confining ourselves to diseases alone, what about all the children who contract the common flu each year and die from it? Even this year, more children have died of the flu than Covid -- and this is a light flu year, whereas it's the worst Covid will ever be. Next year, when even more children are dying of the flu, will you be in favor of lockdowns to save their lives? Or is your outrage conveniently timed, and turned on and off as needed?
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 227   +227
So it's ok if just a few die of suicide, or violent crime? Or are beaten by their spouses, or have permanent developmental issues? Or any of the other risks which lockdowns have intensified? What if it's your sibling, or your child?

Confining ourselves to diseases alone, what about all the children who contract the common flu each year and die from it? Even this year, more children have died of the flu than Covid -- and this is a light flu year, whereas it's the worst Covid will ever be. Next year, when even more children are dying of the flu, will you be in favor of lockdowns to save their lives? Or is your outrage conveniently timed, and turned on and off as needed?
Interesting statistics... oh wait.

I think you miss my point. Every life matters not just those who die of suicide. What you're saying is essentially, send the suicidal to an amusement part (when there are plenty of other actions that can help them cope). Sure! That'll cure them!

It's a funny thing to claim stats while ignoring the safety precautions and laws in place despite those stats. For example, people claim "more people die of [insert reason]". So lets use what has appeared in this thread... car crashes. Well, how many more people would die without seat belts... you know, the thing that keeps us safe in an accident. Despite our best efforts, people still die for various reasons. One of them is due to people not wearing them. The same is true when people DO NOT FOLLOW THE RULES.

The point of isolation is to PREVENT spreading. I know of 3 people this year that have DIED from COVID from the couple dozen or so that got it. A number of them got it because they DID NOT FOLLOW THE RULES. Why don't you do some research on what the infection rate / death rate of COVID would be at if NO ONE followed the rules? We would see a significantly different number. Do you know anyone who works in the medical field or do you know anyone who has been seriously infected? I'm assuming no.

I also know of people affected by suicide because I know personally of those who have committed suicide. It's very sad and I don't want anyone to die, if it's preventable. That's the key, if it's preventable. There are a lot more things going on than just depression that trigger suicide and there are things we can do to prevent it that don't involve a theme park.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,216
The point of isolation is to PREVENT spreading.
You apparently believe that's a revelation from on high. But let's walk you through your faulty reasoning:

Posit: Isolation prevents diseases from spreading.
Posit: Diseases kill people.
Posit: Saving lives should be our overriding concern.
Conclusion: We should isolate everyone forever, to save as many lives as possible.

There are many deadly infectious diseases other than Covid. In the US, more children have died THIS YEAR from the common flu than from Covid. Even for adults, your lifetime risk of death from the flu is much higher than that from Covid.

Furthermore, isolation itself kills people -- in some nations (like Japan) it's killing far more people than Covid is. When "following the rules" kills more people than it saves, it's time to change the rules.

Do you know anyone who works in the medical field or do you know anyone who has been seriously infected? I'm assuming no.
You assume wrongly, of course, on both counts.
 

Raytrace3D

Posts: 227   +227
You apparently believe that's a revelation from on high. But let's walk you through your faulty reasoning:

Posit: Isolation prevents diseases from spreading.
Posit: Diseases kill people.
Posit: Saving lives should be our overriding concern.
Conclusion: We should isolate everyone forever, to save as many lives as possible.

There are many deadly infectious diseases other than Covid. In the US, more children have died THIS YEAR from the common flu than from Covid. Even for adults, your lifetime risk of death from the flu is much higher than that from Covid.

Furthermore, isolation itself kills people -- in some nations (like Japan) it's killing far more people than Covid is. When "following the rules" kills more people than it saves, it's time to change the rules.

You assume wrongly, of course, on both counts.

First and foremost, I will self isolate for as long as it takes. Good news for me though, history says this wont take "forever". You may want to read a book or two about it or talk to someone in the medical field who is currently dealing with it.

It might help your case if you show your work. So here are some statistics for you. According the the CDC (which is providing an "overestimate" according to their own website), since 2010, the average flu season kills between 12,000-61,000 Americans. How many have died this year from COVID? 217,000 deaths so far in the US.

A core reason to self-isolate is to prevent the spread, not just to prevent deaths, but to prevent unnecessary deaths. The health care system is over capacity right now. This means that there will be people who will not be able to be treated properly. Simply put, more people are going to die as more and more are infected because they can't get the treatment they need. It's as simple as that.

But sure, if the Flu is so bad, why aren't our hospitals overflowing with Flu patience every year? Because it's symptoms are not the same as COVID. You can't compare the two. Yes, many do go to the hospital for the Flu, but many, many more for COVID.

Enjoy this article from people who know more about the subject then two people on a tech forum:
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,216
According the the CDC (which is providing an "overestimate" according to their own website), since 2010, the average flu season kills between 12,000-61,000 Americans.
I won't even get into how incorrect the "overestimate" portion of that is, because even by using those figures, my point is made. The annual risk from the flu is essentially constant. The risk from Covid, however, is high at present because it is novel. (As your own link points out). Few have been exposed to Covid, whereas the flu has been killing people for centuries.

Next year very few will die of Covid, but just as many will die of the flu. Your overall risk of dying from the flu is much higher than that of Covid. And, for children, even your current risk from the flu is higher. So why do we not lockdown to eradicate the flu?

There is one reason, and one only for widespread lockdowns. And in the early days of the pandemic, at least, the media was actually reporting it correctly: you lock down to flatten the curve. To keep from overfilling the hospital system. Not to eliminate the disease. No lockdown has ever eliminated a highly infectious disease once it has achieved community spread.

Despite what you may have heard from a few hyperventilating media outlets, our medical system is not overcapacity right now. Many areas are at, or near capacity, true. But since the pandemic began, not one single Covid-19 patient has gone without a hospital bed. The media was predicting hundreds of thousands would in NYC alone -- we sent a hospital ship there, and the ship sat empty for lack of patients.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,334   +1,216
Yes, many do go to the hospital for the Flu, but many, many more for COVID.
Among those age 19 or younger, the IFR (infection fatality rate) for Covid is 0.003%, less than one twentieth the fatality rate for the flu for that cohort. You have to reach the 50-69 group before Covid IFR exceeds that of the flu ... and of course increases dramatically for the 70+ bracket.