The level of precision in this OK Go music video is off the charts

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

It’s a bit unusual for a band to shoot a music video for a song that debuted more than two years ago but that’s exactly what American rock band OK Go has done. Moreover, you’re probably wondering why we’re talking about it here although after you watch, you’ll understand why.

The majority of the video for the song The One Moment from the band’s fourth studio album, Hungry Ghosts, "unfolds over 4.2 seconds of real time." In super slow motion, however, and with a small amount of real-time video mixed in, it takes just shy of four minutes.

What’s amazing here is how the action on screen syncs perfectly with the song as it plays. There’s really no way to describe the ridiculously high level of precision on exhibit here in words.

OK Go frontman and video director Damian Kulash told Radio.com that the shoot was basically all math. When you’re working at those tiny time intervals, it’s too fast for the human eye to see.

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D

davislane1

"There’s really no way to describe the ridiculously high level of precision on exhibit here in words."

The musicians were able to keep proper time.

Edit for clarity: They first programed the charges. Once they had a sequence nailed down, they translated the raw time to "musical" time. Once they determined that, they gave everybody a countdown before setting off the charges to establish the correct tempo. The rest was a matter of coming in on the right beat and conforming to whatever rhythmic notation was practiced beforehand (e.g. whether it will take a 16th or 32nd note worth of time to flip through a card book).
 
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m4a4

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"There’s really no way to describe the ridiculously high level of precision on exhibit here in words."

The musicians were able to keep proper time.

Edit for clarity: They first programed the charges. Once they had a sequence nailed down, they translated the raw time to "musical" time. Once they determined that, they gave everybody a countdown before setting off the charges to establish the correct tempo. The rest was a matter of coming in on the right beat and conforming to whatever rhythmic notation was practiced beforehand (e.g. whether it will take a 16th or 32nd note worth of time to flip through a card book).
That and it is slowed down so much that you won't be able to tell if they changed the speed slightly (to hit the beat).
 
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Bubbajim

TechSpot Staff
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"There’s really no way to describe the ridiculously high level of precision on exhibit here in words."

The musicians were able to keep proper time.

Edit for clarity: They first programed the charges. Once they had a sequence nailed down, they translated the raw time to "musical" time. Once they determined that, they gave everybody a countdown before setting off the charges to establish the correct tempo. The rest was a matter of coming in on the right beat and conforming to whatever rhythmic notation was practiced beforehand (e.g. whether it will take a 16th or 32nd note worth of time to flip through a card book).
Except the song is years older than the video, so it's nothing to do with the musicians and how they're playing. It's just working out the fractions of seconds between each beat and section of the song, so it's even less convoluted than you've suggested. But! Amazing nonetheless.
 
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