Tim Berners-Lee is auctioning off the web's original source code as an NFT

midian182

Posts: 6,916   +62
Staff member
TL;DR: Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the man who invented the web, is jumping on the non-fungible token bandwagon by auctioning off an NFT representing the original source code of the World Wide Web. Bids start at $1,000, but it's expected to sell for an impressive amount of money, some of which will go toward initiatives supported by Berners-Lee and his wife, Rosemary Leith.

Named "This Changed Everything," the NFT will go on sale at Sotheby's auction house on June 23 for a week. The single-edition NFT contains four elements: the original time-stamped files containing the source code written by Berners-Lee in 1990 and 1991; an animated visualization of the code being written; a letter written by Berners-Lee reflecting on the code and the process of creating it; and a digital "poster" of the entire code created by him from the original files using Python, which includes a graphic of his physical signature.

"Three decades ago, I created something which, with the subsequent help of a huge number of collaborators across the world, has been a powerful tool for humanity," Berners-Lee said. "While I do not make predictions about the future, I sincerely hope its use, knowledge and potential will remain open and available to us all to continue to innovate, create and initiate the next technological transformation, that we cannot yet imagine. NFTs (non-fungible tokens), be they artworks or a digital artifact like this, are the latest playful creations in this realm, and the most appropriate means of ownership that exists. They are the ideal way to package the origins behind the web."

Sotheby's has compared the files, which contain around 9,555 lines of code, to the original copies of the Magna Carta and Leonardo's Codex in terms of their significance. They also contain implementations of the three languages and protocols invented by Berners-Lee—HTML, HTTP, URIs—along with original HTML documents that instructed early web users on how to use the application.

"Sir Tim's invention created a new world, democratizing the sharing of information, creating new ways of thinking and interacting, and staying connected to one another," said Cassandra Hatton, global head of science and popular culture at Sotheby's.

"Over the past several centuries humankind has seen a succession of paradigm shifts that have brought us forward into the modern era ... but none has had the seismic impact on our daily lives as the creation of the World Wide Web."

This Changed Everything has the potential to be one of the most expensive NFTs ever sold. Whether it reaches the record $69 million that auction house Christie's and artist Mike Winkelmann made with "EVERYDAYS: THE FIRST 5000 DAYS" (above) remains to be seen.

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captaincranky

Posts: 16,979   +5,751
"Fungible" to me, sounds like a neologism concocted by a schizophrenic.

Or maybe something from a porn movie."Oh, baby, baby, you're the most fungible creature I've ever 'bumped' into".

Guess who's never going to make it in the art world? moi :facepalm:
 
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Norsiiii

Posts: 28   +30
"Fungible" to me, sounds like a neologism concocted by a schizophrenic.

Or maybe something from a porn movie."Oh, baby, baby, you're the most fungible creature I've ever 'bumped' into".

Guess who's never going to make it in the art world? moi :facepalm:
I mean, the word has been a part of the English language since the 1700's, having come from Latin before that, and had legal and financial meaning. It has only been relevant to "art" in the form of NFT's very recently
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,979   +5,751
I mean, the word has been a part of the English language since the 1700's, having come from Latin before that, and had legal and financial meaning. It has only been relevant to "art" in the form of NFT's very recently
And I'll start to try and find an everyday use for it, when I revert to using "thee" and "thou" as pronouns.

But seriously, don't you think it sounds a "a little saucy"?

Much of the English language comes from Latin. Granted, it's a potpourri, of French, German, and a few others. The thing we dd right, is grab sensible sentence structure from German. That Romance "Le, lo, la" nonsense happening at the front of sentences is well, cryptic
 

Norsiiii

Posts: 28   +30
And I'll start to try and find an everyday use for it, when I revert to using "thee" and "thou" as pronouns.

But seriously, don't you think it sounds a "a little saucy"?

Much of the English language comes from Latin. Granted, it's a potpourri, of French, German, and a few others. The thing we dd right, is grab sensible sentence structure from German. That Romance "Le, lo, la" nonsense happening at the front of sentences is well, cryptic
Some mild pseudo-connotations that seem to make me think of fungus, sure
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,979   +5,751
Some mild pseudo-connotations that seem to make me think of fungus, sure
It's funnier if you try and conjugate, (or use it) it like a verb. (Although "conjugate & verb" are sort of redundant in this context).

Childish sure. but funny.

All this talk of "funging", somehow triggered memories of A Clockwork Orange., and its hybrid Russo-English slang.
 
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Norsiiii

Posts: 28   +30
It's funnier if you try and conjugate, (or use it) it like a verb. (Although "conjugate & verb" are sort of redundant in this context).

Childish sure. but funny.

All this talk of "funging", somehow triggered memories of A Clockwork Orange., and its hybrid Russo-English slang.
while there is technically no correct verb form of the word, if you tried to conjugate it into 'fungigation' (presumably to describe the action mixing/exchanging of distinct yet interchangeable items, I guess...?), you indeed do land upon an existing verb that describes a method of applying fungicide 🤣