Ubuntu 19.10 lands with GNOME 3.34, Linux Kernel 5.3, Raspberry Pi 4 support and more

onetheycallEric

TS Addict
Staff member

Canonical, the company behind Linux Ubuntu, has put the finishing touches on Ubuntu 19.10 (or Eoan Ermine, if you'd rather). There's a lot of new features and updates with this release to dig into, so be sure to check out the release notes. Otherwise, there's a few main draws for Ubuntu 19.10.

One of the highlights of Ubuntu 19.10 is improved hardware support, especially as it pertains to Nvidia users. Ubuntu 19.10 comes with Nvidia drivers directly in the ISO, and Canonical notes other Nvidia-specific enhancements such as rendering smoothness, frame rates and reliability. Ubuntu 19.10 is also based on the Linux Kernel 5.3, and with it comes support for AMD's Navi-based GPUs, Ryzen 3000-series motherboards, Zhaoxin x86 processors, and new Arm SoCs.

The GNOME 3.34 desktop also ships with Ubuntu 19.10, bringing with it bug fixes as well as performance improvements like increased responsiveness and lower CPU usage. Users can also categorize groups and icons by dragging and dropping, select new light or dark themes, and there's support for the new ZFS file system.

Rounding out the notables, there's support for Raspberry Pi 4 devices. Canonical notes that with this release, Ubuntu 19.10 is now supporting almost all flavors of Raspberry Pi devices. Ubuntu 19.10 also comes with new edge computing functionality and multi-cloud infrastructure support. Ubuntu 19.10 can be downloaded here.

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Slappy McPhee

TS Addict
The question on the Pi 4 which doesn't seem to be answered in the release notes is whether or not they have provided hardware accel support. If not then it will run like hot garbage like the rest of the distros for it. The fact that the Pi foundation released without hardware accel support so early is plain silly.
 

pioruns

TS Enthusiast
Why bother with Ubuntu when there is Debian. Rock solid and stable, you can install it once and it will run for years. It's not like few years ago when it struggled a bit behind Mint and Ubuntu. Nowadays everything works perfectly, including 4k videos, acceleration, multiple monitors and all multimedia.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Windows users typically scorn all Linux distros, particularly those who have embraced Windows 10 wholeheartedly, since iit has such a low adoption rate overall.

Raspberry Pi "users", have to be at about 1% of Linux users, which places the device in the "toy for computer snobs and hobbyists" category, certainly not the platform which is going to run the family finances.

I've always had one question about Linux itself in general. That would be, "which is more secure online, Windows with AV, or Linux without"?

The lack of a freebie A/V for Linux has kept me away from it for web use, and the lack of Adobe support for it, has kept me away from it on my home only machines.

OK, so I'm cheap as well as cranky. So what?
 
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Archean

TechSpot Paladin
Windows users typically scorn all Linux distros, particularly those who have embraced Windows 10 wholeheartedly, since iit has such a low adoption rate overall.

Raspberry Pi "users", have to be at about 1% of Linux users, which places the device in the "toy for computer snobs and hobbyists" category, certainly not the platform which is going to run the family finances.

I've always had one question about Linux itself in general. That would be, "which is more secure online, Windows with AV, or Linux without"?

The lack of a freebie A/Y for Linux has kept me away from it for web use, and the lack of Adobe support for it, has kept me away from it on my home only machines.

OK, so I'm cheap as well as cranky. So what?

Well I've done far worse, ie running Ubuntu on a USB disk just for the heck of it. Wasn't fun, but it works, well apart from few small issues. 🤔 🙄
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Well I've done far worse, ie running Ubuntu on a USB disk just for the heck of it. Wasn't fun, but it works, well apart from few small issues. 🤔 🙄
Linux was once known for running with very limited resources. However, its hardware needs (in my experience), have eclipsed Windows XP. Every once in a while, I'll install Ubuntu as as dual boot, if only to insure I have some sort of data access / recovery plan, should Windows get moody and refuse to boot.

I did have an older eMachines (T-5026 circa 2005) with something like Ubuntu 15 installed. The board chipset was IGP Intel 915. XP chugged along just fine, but if you looked at the machine sideways, the Linux graphics driver crashed into nothing fine multi colored stripes.

I|m obviously not complaining about a free OS keeping up with such an antiquated platform, but it was pretty useless.

Nowadays, I try not to keep anything I can't afford to lose on my web connected machines. If an emergency occurred, I'd just yank the storage drive
and retrieve the data with another Windows machine. (Assuming no system wide infection was observed).
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
Why bother with Ubuntu when there is Debian. Rock solid and stable, you can install it once and it will run for years. It's not like few years ago when it struggled a bit behind Mint and Ubuntu. Nowadays everything works perfectly, including 4k videos, acceleration, multiple monitors and all multimedia.
ROS immediately jumps to mind. I'll bet there are also a few AI/ML platforms as well that really only work with Ubuntu.
 

bobc4012

TS Booster
Windows users typically scorn all Linux distros, particularly those who have embraced Windows 10 wholeheartedly, since iit has such a low adoption rate overall.

.....

I've always had one question about Linux itself in general. That would be, "which is more secure online, Windows with AV, or Linux without"?

The lack of a freebie A/V for Linux has kept me away from it for web use, and the lack of Adobe support for it, has kept me away from it on my home only machines.

OK, so I'm cheap as well as cranky. So what?
Have you tried to use ClamAV?
 
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pioruns

TS Enthusiast
ROS immediately jumps to mind. I'll bet there are also a few AI/ML platforms as well that really only work with Ubuntu.
Unfortunately I don't know what ROS is. And I don't use any AI/ML platform either (whatever that is). Average user, just like me, will be fine without Ubuntu.
 

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