Weekend Open Forum: Your very first computer

supyo

TS Enthusiast
I remember it like yesterday. Going to Future Shop with my dad in 1992. We bought an AST Advantage Pro! 486/33DX, 8MB running Windows 3.1

Great memories with that PC and pissing off my parents with sky high Compuserve and America Online bills. Those services were ridiculously expensive in 1992/93.
 
G

Guest

My first computer was a AMSTRAD CPC 128 a 3" [inch] floppy drive and 64KByte RAM.
You could use either BASIC or CP/M computing language.
My first INTEL based system featured an 8086 CPU, 64MByte RAM and a 20MByte Hard drive.
 

sauri

TS Member
The very first was ZX Spectrum in 1991, I was 16.
2 years later I got my first PC: 386dx40, 4mb ram, 120mb hdd, realtek 256k video, 14" CRT, no sound/cd-rom and MS-DOS 6 for an OS. The first thing I did run on it was the "Comanche".
 

risc32

TS Addict
Commodore 64. first computer I bought, pentium class 233, that I replaced with an AMD k6-2 400 that I OC'd. I pined for that k6-3 chip, but it never happened.
 

veLa

TS Evangelist
My dad was a teacher at the American School of the Hague at the time, and instead of throwing an old Macintosh 128K they gave it to me. Must have been sometime in 1997.

Whenever I moved the States in 2001 we got some sort of Dell computer and finally got dial up internet.
 
G

Guest

Timex-Sinclair 1000, with 2k of RAM, Z80 processor. Upgraded with 16k RAM pack later.
 

Gamesinner

TS Rookie
My first real computer was the Commodore 64. My cousin had one and I fell in love with it when we used to stay up on weekends and game all night. I had to beg borrow and stel for a year to get my own. But when I did, I enjoyed the hell out of it. I still enjoy playing some of those old games via emulation. It was a great system for a gamer. Kickstart was one of my favorite games, Trials HD reminds me of it on the Xbox 360.
 
C

CortyDK

Store-built beige tower with:
Intel 386DX 33mhz with 387 co-processor
4 Mb 30-pin EDO Ram.
51 Mb HDD (later expanded with a 120Mb)
3.5" and 5.25" FDD (later expanded with 2x speed CD-Rom
Cirrus Logic ISA graphics card (later replaced with Tseng Labs ET4000 with a whopping 1,25 Mb RAM)
14 inch CRT monitor (640x480)
- Later I added a CreativeLabs SoundBlaster 8bit ISA soundcard and a couple of Trust speakers. - I still have this soundcard in its original cardboard case with manuals and original floppydiscs (incl Lemmings on a 720 kbyte disk).
MS-DOS 5 (Later 6.0 and 6.22)
Norton Commander
Later Windows 3.1.
 
C

CortyDK

Store-built beige tower with:
Intel 386DX 33mhz with 387 co-processor
4 Mb 30-pin EDO Ram.
51 Mb HDD (later expanded with a 120Mb)
3.5" and 5.25" FDD (later expanded with 2x speed CD-Rom
Cirrus Logic ISA graphics card (later replaced with Tseng Labs ET4000 with a whopping 1,25 Mb RAM)
14 inch CRT monitor (640x480)
- Later I added a CreativeLabs SoundBlaster 8bit ISA soundcard and a couple of Trust speakers. - I still have this soundcard in its original cardboard case with manuals and original floppydiscs (incl Lemmings on a 720 kbyte disk).
MS-DOS 5 (Later 6.0 and 6.22)
Norton Commander
Later Windows 3.1.
I forgot to mention the Travan QIC-80 tape drive connected to the floppy controller. What a piece of junk....
 

DjKraid

TS Guru
Oh, that memory lane :D

The first computer that I got didn't work so I have no clue what it's specs were, I just got it so that I could pick it to pieces. The 2nd computer that I got however, worked just fine but I didn't ever have any use for it since I couldn't even play any games on it...and besides, I had a NES which did the trick on that front :)

Intel 133MHz
4Mb RAM
300Mb HDD
Windows 3.1
GPU = not a clue, it struggled to show 256-colors

Those were the days, no worries what so ever...damn I feel old now...
 

Railman

TS Booster
My first PC that I built was in March 1996.

Intel P75 CPU
Quantum 1.2 GB HDD
Win 3.11
Trident 9440 PCI 1 Mb Graphics Card

Other components I can't identify from the invoices but the cost was more than my current system!

It was not the first PC that I have used as I did use quite a variety of PCs at work including the Apricot Portable and the IBM XT.
 
G

Guest

How about an IBM PC-jr in 1988. Got an Employee Discount! We all sat around and played Carmen Sandiago.


CBL
 
G

Guest

The first one I bought: Texas Instruments TI99.

With 16 K Ram.

Very expensive those days.


After that many Atari ST-models (being a musician, those where great with the MIDI-interface and good sequencing/recording soft. Pitty Apple took that market (by buying Logic, the greatest MIDI-soft ever on Atari ST).
 
G

Guest

Time machine was my first PC ,Though my brothers had a ZX spectrum and an Amiga's a few years before
AMD K6 500Mhz
128mb ram
20GB Seagate barracudda
onboard sound,video and networking :(
17 inch CRT
cheap mouse and keyboard
printer and scanner thown in

Seem to remember it cost around £550 in 1999
 
Started on...
Apple II
C64 (dual 5.25 drives... I was soon cool ;)
Sanyo MBC-550 (8088 I believe)
The only thing I still have from the 80's is my Atari 2600
 

KupKaa

TS Rookie
Interestingly enough, I used a variety of computers at university - DEC/VAX, Convex, Sun workstations, SGI workstations. And then when I got out I got myself a Compaq PC with maybe all of 512MB of RAM and Windows (XP, or Pre-XP, whatever it was nearly 2 decades ago). Switching to Windows from mostly Unix was a learning curve, believe me. :)
 
G

Guest

Heathkit H-88 also referred to by Zenith as the Z-89 (around 1978-79)

All in one computer, build it yourself (really build and assemble it yourself)
Z-80 microprocessor running at the astounding speed of 2mHz
48K Ram upgradable to 64K Ram
5 1/4 inch drive (making it an H-89)
Screen showed 80 characters across, 24 rows down (better than Apple II and TRS-80)
CP/M operating system replacing the original HDOS, therefore had access to all the CP/M software
Heathkit users had their own magazine called SEXtant
It's the computer shown in the current AMC techno-drama Halt and Catch Fire on all the desktops
That's where all the Z-89's went to die, like the elephants.

I bought this computer kit for the word processing capabilities to write my doctoral dissertation, because I kept changing my mind when I wrote (WordStar, what happen to you?) . The Heathkit company didn't care if you opened the case, since you built it in the first place (unlike Apple and less so Radio Shack) . Many of the users upgraded the microprocessors to the 4mHz Z-80A and the 6mHz Z-80B. Now that's a real upgrade in speed, not the 10-20% you see today. Also, you could change the black and white CRT (cathode ray tube - "picture tube") to a green or (later) an amber CRT. These computers were real "hands on computers" for those of us than liked to tinker. I have the computer boxed up in my basement. I think I'll have it buried with me when I die.

-- J R, MD, PhD
(Boy, do I feel old.)
 
G

Guest

I remember my first computer very vividly. It was an Amstrad PC1640. The numbers stood for the amount of RAM it came with: 640KB! Mind you, this was a step up from the Amstrad PC1512, which only had 512KB's of RAM.
My Amstrad had the CGA 16 color screen (14" I think?, not sure) and it came with a whoppin' 20 MB hard drive and one 5 1/4" floppy disk drive.

Those were the days. The Amstrad's BIOS was powered by four replaceable AA-batteries, and the power supply was build into the monitor. Which means that without the original monitor, the actual computer itself is useless.

Sadly mine got tossed years and years later, because it was obsolete. It was still in perfect working condition. 20 years later I regret that I ever tossed it. I really want to get my hands on one again, but vintage computers are hard to find, and they've gotten quite expensive.
 
G

Guest

My first computer was the Ferranti Pegasus and in 1960 I wrote my first computer programme, which solved quadratic equations x = -b (b2
 

ET3D

TechSpot Paladin
Disregarding the TI-58C, which I imagine not everyone will consider a computer (even though it was programmable), my first computer was a Sinclair ZX80. Unfortunately it didn't work, so I sent it back to be replaced and got back a much drabber (but more advanced) ZX81.
 

Ian Ward

TS Member
1987 - Hewlett - Packard Vectra ES/12, 640kb Ram + 20MB hard disk + CGA monitor, worked as field engineer for HP partner in South Africa.