Xbox Series S 'Quick Resume' trailer shows just how fast you can switch from game to game

Cal Jeffrey

Posts: 2,593   +606
Staff member
On like Donkey Kong: The console war has moved into full swing now that Sony has laid its pricing and launch date cards on the table. From here out, it will be a marketing blitz between the rivals to show potential customers why they have the better system.

Today, Microsoft responded yesterday's PlayStation 5 price reveal by dropping a trailer showing off the "Quick Resume" feature on the Xbox Series S. Quick Resume allows players to move from one game to another in just a few seconds. The company announced the feature back in February, but this is our first look at it in action, and it's pretty impressive.

By way of contrast, switching from one game to another on the PlayStation 4 requires quitting the currently loaded game and starting a new one. Depending on load times, this could take anywhere from 30 seconds to a minute or more, not including the time it takes to load your saved game.

The video shows that on the Xbox Series S, this process consistently takes only seven seconds. Additionally, there is zero save loading. After the game boots back up, you are instantly placed where you left off. It's like pausing your game to play another game, which is what you are doing essentially.

"Quick Resume enables players to seamlessly switch between multiple titles from a suspended state almost instantly, returning you to where you were and what you were doing, without waiting through long loading screens," says Microsoft.

Technically, the Xbox One can do this too, but only with one game at a time. The more powerful hardware in the Series X | S will handle the suspension of multiple games on the fly.

It's going to be interesting watching these two rivals duke it out over the next seven weeks leading up to launch. No doubt, each will have some impressive demos to show us as they trade blow for blow.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 3,556   +3,384
Well thank goodness it has a fast SSD!

I absolutely love using SSD because it makes switching from game to game quickly.
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,008   +1,853
TechSpot Elite
Hmmm... I wonder if game platforms (or even MS) is working on the PC equivalent of that (using a mandatory SSD). Can't be falling behind consoles :p
 

defaultluser

Posts: 33   +32
Hmmm... I wonder if game platforms (or even MS) is working on the PC equivalent of that (using a mandatory SSD). Can't be falling behind consoles :p

It's called Windows Superfetch, originally introduced with Vista. An SSD just make it more seamless (but Windows 10 on an SSD still performs this every time you restart).

As for being able to switch between suspended games, Windows already allows you to do this. It's called Alt-tab. Borderless Fulllscreen was introduced with Windows 10, to make it smoother.

The reason this is so hard for consoles to do is because they lack sufficient spare ram to cache more than one game into main memory. If you have twice as much system ram as you need for a particular game, then you can easily run two copies in ram, and switch between them. Ram is fast and small on a console, so they need a trick like super-fast SSD to get the same functionality.

If you don't like to keep a game running, Windows will keep it resident in ram when you quit, making the next load off the hard drive significantly faster (but you can't really tell on a system with an SSD.)

I have been running my Windows systems for the last ten years on SATA6 SSDs, so you bet PC users are already used to this. Even low-end PCs are shipping with the same SATA6 SSDs today!

I also remember the bad old days of 5400rpm notebook hard drives, and have felt bad for the console users...NOW you get to finally live in the high-speed world.

And by the time a console game port finally exceeds the throughput offered by SATA6 SSDs, we will already have transitioned to m.2. We'v got at-least another 3 years before they start releasing games not compatible with the Xbox One S, and PS5 exclusives will take just as long to finally be ported to PC (see Horizon Zero Dawn).

Meanwhile, Midrange PCs ARE ALREADY moving to m.2!

 
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m4a4

Posts: 2,008   +1,853
TechSpot Elite
It's called Windows Superfetch, originally introduced with Vista. An SSD just make it more seamless (but Windows 10 on an SSD still performs this every time you restart).

As for being able to switch between suspended games, Windows already allows you to do this. It's called Alt-tab. Borderless Fulllscreen was introduced with Windows 10, to make it smoother.

The reason this is so hard for consoles to do is because they lack sufficient spare ram to cache more than one game into main memory. If you have twice as much system ram as you need for a particular game, then you can easily run two copies in ram, and switch between them. Ram is fast and small on a console, so they need a trick like super-fast SSD to get the same functionality.

If you don't like to keep a game running, Windows will keep it resident in ram when you quit, making the next load off the hard drive significantly faster (but you can't really tell on a system with an SSD.)

I have been running my Windows systems for the last ten years on SATA6 SSDs, so you bet PC users are already used to this. Even low-end PCs are shipping with the same SATA6 SSDs today!

I also remember the bad old days of 5400rpm notebook hard drives, and have felt bad for the console users...NOW you get to finally live in the high-speed world.

And by the time a console game port finally exceeds the throughput offered by SATA6 SSDs, we will already have transitioned to m.2. We'v got at-least another 3 years before they start releasing games not compatible with the Xbox One S, and PS5 exclusives will take just as long to finally be ported to PC (see Horizon Zero Dawn).

Meanwhile, Midrange PCs ARE ALREADY moving to m.2!

I get what you are saying, but from what I understand the next-gen consoles were not trying to store games in RAM in a suspended state, but store the game's RAM on an SSD to have the state fully resumed later.
Windows doesn't do this (yet?) that I can tell, as keeping a game in RAM and alt-tabbing is not anywhere close to what "Quick Resume" promises (especially since PC games still run in the background). You can't suspend a game on PC, reclaim the RAM, and then re-launch it back to it's previous state.

Quickly loading up a game off of an SSD to the menu is nice and all, but it still falls short of what is promised above (fully loading a game back into it's suspended state).
 
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Vulcanproject

Posts: 1,248   +2,075
PC could do this but isn't really setup well at the moment for it. Not save states on modern titles. Opening multiple games is of course possible but I would question the performance and stability over a longer period. Windowless fullscreen? In my experience it isn't reliable when you keep large programs resident in background memory on Windows.

You can strictly control memory requirements on a console much better than PC not least because developers have to meet certification. Among other OS related reasons.

It's an advantage for consoles but I don't see it as a very big deal. Games running now on a fast SSD boot quickly and get in game quickly. The main thing slowing them down are the title logos!

Hopefully this kind of save state ability will transfer across to every modern PC game before too long and integrate in Windows. Consoles moving forward is a good thing, they can bring standardization to PC where the industry previously lacked harmony on a matter.

Everyone benefits.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 33   +32
Quickly loading up a game off of an SSD to the menu is nice and all, but it still falls short of what is promised above (fully loading a game back into it's suspended state).
Windows 10 already has support for fast start, where they suspend your previous session to disk (assueed to be SSD), so adding per-game customization wouldn't be much harder to implement.


I mean , they already have Windows Game Mode - why not Windows Game Suspend?
 
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Mister_K

Posts: 1,973   +630
This is the thing with Xbox Series X vs PS5 and Sony really stroking their NVME nice and hard. Once you enter the NVME market it's more than enough for games.

Of course, we over in the PC enthusiast side have known this for a while. Although streaming more data is going to require faster read speeds each generation with games getting bigger.

I get Sony having to flex somewhere with Xbox being the more powerful console but people running around like its going to make a night and day difference. Still, getting a PS5 at some point, having a PC to handle any M$ exclusives etc...
 
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R3DL1N3

Posts: 12   +2
It's called Windows Superfetch, originally introduced with Vista. An SSD just make it more seamless (but Windows 10 on an SSD still performs this every time you restart).

As for being able to switch between suspended games, Windows already allows you to do this. It's called Alt-tab. Borderless Fulllscreen was introduced with Windows 10, to make it smoother.

The reason this is so hard for consoles to do is because they lack sufficient spare ram to cache more than one game into main memory. If you have twice as much system ram as you need for a particular game, then you can easily run two copies in ram, and switch between them. Ram is fast and small on a console, so they need a trick like super-fast SSD to get the same functionality.

If you don't like to keep a game running, Windows will keep it resident in ram when you quit, making the next load off the hard drive significantly faster (but you can't really tell on a system with an SSD.)

I have been running my Windows systems for the last ten years on SATA6 SSDs, so you bet PC users are already used to this. Even low-end PCs are shipping with the same SATA6 SSDs today!

I also remember the bad old days of 5400rpm notebook hard drives, and have felt bad for the console users...NOW you get to finally live in the high-speed world.

And by the time a console game port finally exceeds the throughput offered by SATA6 SSDs, we will already have transitioned to m.2. We'v got at-least another 3 years before they start releasing games not compatible with the Xbox One S, and PS5 exclusives will take just as long to finally be ported to PC (see Horizon Zero Dawn).

Meanwhile, Midrange PCs ARE ALREADY moving to m.2!

Ok.. so first off the new consoles are NOT using SATA6 (correct name is actually SATA III) they are using a custom NVMe PCI-e 4.0 SSD. Next M.2 is a specification for internally mounted computer expansion cards. as for superfetch, they are not using that either they are using Xbox Velocity Architecture which is a set of hardware and software systems.
Not trying to be disrespectful at all, Just wanted to correct some misinformation. These Next Gen Consoles (PS5 as well) are using some cutting edge tech that actually aren't available in the PC gaming world. AMD already supports PCI-e 4.0 and intel I believe is adding it to their 11th gen architecture . MS is also looking to bring their Velocity Architecture or parts of it to PC. I saw an article but didn't read it..

 

Teko03

Posts: 621   +329
Ahhh yes an SSD welcome to 2014 Microsoft
Considering the last generation of consoles released in 2013 and both were engineered prior to that...I'm not sure if quite understand your use of sarcasm here. Not to mention NVMe SSD's just became a common thing within the last couple of years.
 

HotToz

Posts: 23   +27
I would love to see similar feature in PC, and cut the crap of nvidia, amd, havoc and all other intro Ad
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,008   +1,853
TechSpot Elite
Windows 10 already has support for fast start, where they suspend your previous session to disk (assueed to be SSD), so adding per-game customization wouldn't be much harder to implement.


I mean , they already have Windows Game Mode - why not Windows Game Suspend?
Yeah, so, that's where I would like to see it come to PC. Because it's not supported right now :p
 

Wasteak

Posts: 21   +15
This is the thing with Xbox Series X vs PS5 and Sony really stroking their NVME nice and hard. Once you enter the NVME market it's more than enough for games.

Of course, we over in the PC enthusiast side have known this for a while. Although streaming more data is going to require faster read speeds each generation with games getting bigger.

I get Sony having to flex somewhere with Xbox being the more powerful console but people running around like its going to make a night and day difference. Still, getting a PS5 at some point, having a PC to handle any M$ exclusives etc...
And I'm pretty sure xbox and ps5 ssd will show the same performance on screen.
 

Lounds

Posts: 584   +469
I get what you are saying, but from what I understand the next-gen consoles were not trying to store games in RAM in a suspended state, but store the game's RAM on an SSD to have the state fully resumed later.
Windows doesn't do this (yet?) that I can tell, as keeping a game in RAM and alt-tabbing is not anywhere close to what "Quick Resume" promises (especially since PC games still run in the background). You can't suspend a game on PC, reclaim the RAM, and then re-launch it back to it's previous state.

Quickly loading up a game off of an SSD to the menu is nice and all, but it still falls short of what is promised above (fully loading a game back into it's suspended state).
Yeah sounds similar to virtual memory page filing in Windows which stores certain apps in a temporary running state on the main disk (whether that be a HDD or SSD) but I suspect that quick resume for Xbox will be using some kind of Hypervisor where each game is ran as its own virtual machine and when switching the Xbox suspends the VM and any memory in use is transfer to the SSD in a hibernated/standby state ready to be transferred/turned on into system memory. So out of that 1TB SSD there's got to be a significant chunk let's say 50GB just dedicated for game switching and suspension.