Mozilla Firefox for Linux

Mozilla Firefox for Linux 63.0.1

Improve your browsing experience with Mozilla's open-source and highly acclaimed Firefox.

Freeware
Linux
52.8 MB
86,755
4.1 58 votes

2x faster

Powered by a new, cutting-edge engine, Firefox has doubled its speed from last year. Because the Internet waits for no one.

Lean, mean speed machine

Firefox Quantum’s new engine uses 30% less memory than Chrome, so other programs won’t slow down during browsing. Now that’s a win-win.

Beautiful, intelligent design

Hello, gorgeous! Firefox’s sleek, new look comes loaded with intuitive features like in-browser screenshots and more.

New Tab

Search across multiple sites, view your top pages and discover new content.

Powerful privacy

You’re in control of your online information. Use Firefox Private Browsing to block ads with trackers for extra peace of mind… and pages that load up to 44% faster.

Browse for good

Firefox is backed by the non-profit Mozilla, who keeps the Internet healthier through programs that support tech education for girls, create trust around factual news, bring civility to the comments section and more.

Library

Enjoy everything you’ve saved to Firefox while browsing in one, easy place.

Extensions

Personalize Firefox with your favorite extras that help you do you.

Mobile Browsing

Access your bookmarks, open tabs and passwords across all your devices.

What's New:

Hello there! It’s been six-odd weeks, and the march of progress continues to, uh… march… progressingly. That means we have a brand new Firefox to share, with an abundance of bug fixes, performance improvements, and (in particular) sweet developer tool treats! So tuck in your napkin and enjoy this tasting menu of some of what’s new in Firefox 62.

Shape Up Your Floats

CSS Shapes lets a floated element sculpt the flow of content around it beyond the classic rectangular bounding box we’ve been constrained to. For instance, in the above screenshot and linked demo, the text is wrapping to the shape of the grapes vs the image’s border. There are properties for basic shapes all the way up to complex polygons. There are of course great docs on all of this, but Firefox 62 also includes new tooling to both inspect and visually manipulate CSS Shapes values.

You can learn more in Josh Marinacci’s post on the new CSS Shapes tooling from yesterday.

Variable Fonts Are Here

No punny title, I’m just excited! OpenType Font Variations allow a single font file to contain multiple instances of the same font, encoding the differences between instances. In addition to being in one file, font creators can expose any number of variation axes that give developers fine-grained control on how a font is rendered. These can be standard variations like font weight (font weight 536 looks right? no problem!) or things that were never previously available via CSS (x-height! serif-size!). In addition to the candy-store possibilities for typography nerds, being able to serve a single file with multiple variants is a major page weight savings. Dan Callahan goes much deeper on the grooviness to be found and how Firefox makes it easy to tweak these new custom values.

Devtools Commands

The Developer Toolbar was an alternate command repl input in the Firefox Developer tools, apart from the Web Console. I say “was” because as of Firefox 62, it has been removed. It was always a bit hard to find and not as well-advertised as it could be, but did encapsulate some powerful commands. Most of these commands have been progressively migrated elsewhere in the devtools, and this is wrapped up in Firefox 62, so we’ve removed the toolbar altogether.

One of the last commands to be migrated is screenshot, which is a power-user version of the “take a screenshot” button available in the devtools UI. The screenshot command is now available as :screenshot in the Web Console. For example, have you ever needed a high-res screenshot of a page for print? You can specify a higher pixel density for a screenshot via the command: :screenshot --dpr 4

There are a bunch of other options as well, such as specifying output filenames, capture delays, and selector-cropped screenshots. Eric Meyer wrote a great primer on the power of :screenshot on his blog, and it will change your page capture game.

Mo’ Pixels, Mo’ Panels

Do you have a 4k monitor? Do your browser windows bathe in a wash of ample screen real-estate? Let your devtools stretch their legs with a new 3-column mode in the Page Inspector. You can now pop the CSS Rules view into its own column, to let you view style information and the excellent Grid tooling or Animations panel side-by-side.

Streamlining MediaStream

If you’ve worked with WebRTC’s getUserMedia API, you may be familiar with a bit of branching logic when attaching a MediaStream object to a

navigator.mediaDevices.getUserMedia({ audio: true, video: true }) .then(function(stream) { if ("srcObject" in video) { videoEl.srcObject = stream; } else { videoEl.src = URL.createObjectURL(stream); } });

It’s true that earlier support for WebRTC required the use of the URL API, but this was non-standard and is no longer necessary. Firefox 62 removes support for passing a MediaStream to createObjectURL, so be sure you’re using a proper capability check as above.

New

  • Firefox Home (the default New Tab) now allows users to display up to 4 rows of top sites, Pocket stories, and highlights
  • “Reopen in Container” tab menu option appears for users with Containers that lets them choose to reopen a tab in a different container
  • In advance of removing all trust for Symantec-issued certificates in Firefox 63, a preference was added that allows users to distrust certificates issued by Symantec. To use this preference, go to about:config in the address bar and set the preference "security.pki.distrust_ca_policy" to 2.
  • Added FreeBSD support for WebAuthn
  • Improved graphics rendering for Windows users without accelerated hardware using Parallel-Off-Main-Thread Painting
  • Support for CSS Shapes, allowing for richer web page layouts. This goes hand in hand with a brand new Shape Path Editor in the CSS inspector.
  • CSS Variable Fonts (OpenType Font Variations) support, which makes it possible to create beautiful typography with a single font file
  • Updates for enterprise environments:
  • AutoConfig is sandboxed to the documented API by default. You can disable the sandbox by setting the preference general.config.sandbox_enabled to false. Our long term plan is to remove the ability to turn off the sandboxing. If you need to continue to use more complex AutoConfig scripts, you will need to use Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR).
  • Added Canadian English (en-CA) locale

Fixed

  • Various security fixes

Changed

  • Removed the description field for bookmarks. Users who have stored descriptions using the field may wish to export these descriptions as html or json files, as they will be removed in a future release.
  • Dark theme is automatically enabled in macOS 10.14 dark mode
  • Changed the default setting to Enforce (3) for the security.pki.name_matching_mode preference
  • Adobe Flash applets now run in a more secure mode using process sandboxing on macOS. Learn how this may affect features here.
  • Users disconnecting from Sync are now offered the option to wipe their Firefox profile data (including bookmarks, passwords, history, cookies, and site data) from their desktop computer
  • Changed how WebRTC handles screen sharing: When screen-sharing a window, the window will be brought to front

Developer

  • Three-pane Inspector in Developer Tools separates the rules into its own panel