In context: If you ever find yourself in a situation where you don't have access to clean running water, there are a few things you can do to adapt and survive. Buying bottled water at the store in preparation for an emergency is an obvious option, but products like the LifeStraw (which can purify water from lakes, streams, ponds, and rivers) can work wonders, too.

Water tech company Watergen hopes to offer yet another (more expensive) solution with its latest announcement. At CES 2020, Watergen unveiled the solar-powered GENNY, a new version of its impressive moisture-based water provider.

The existing GENNY uses dehumidifier-like technology to suck moisture from the air and convert it into clean, cool, and drinkable water. It's impressive technology, but it requires a wall outlet to function, as most other water coolers do.

The new GENNY, however, removes that requirement entirely, thanks to an array of four massive solar panels that ship with the product. Though it otherwise functions the same as existing GENNYs, the new version can power itself when setup outside -- no plugs or plumbing needed.

"Offering all the same advantages as GENNY, it is ideally suited to use in remote locations, rural villages, parks and green residential premises, where the electricity supply is unreliable or unavailable," Watergen says in a press release. "Solar GENNY is able to generate up to 3.5 gallons of water a day."

For reference, the standard GENNY can produce eight gallons of drinkable water per day, so the solar-powered version is a bit less powerful. However, as Watergen says, for remote locations or even simple city parks, the solar GENNY could still be invaluable -- especially if there's more than one around.

Obviously, the solar-powered GENNY is mostly useless for home or office use. Not only would you likely have access to reliable power in such locations (and thus not need a solar-powered alternative), but if the solar GENNY is inside, it can't easily store power from the Sun. Further, you probably wouldn't be able to fit the water generator's required solar panels indoors anyway.

At any rate, the new GENNY is reportedly expected to cost between $5,000 and $8,000, with all expenses (including shipping and installation aid) accounted for. We don't know when it will launch, but hopefully, we'll find out soon.