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Massive Chalice Review: A smart, fun exploration of turn-based tactics

If you want to understand Massive Chalice, you need to understand XCOM. Double Fine’s Massive Chalice has been hugely influenced by Julian Gallop’s seminal 1994 strategy game. Massive Chalice focuses on up-close tactical gameplay and big-picture strategy. It handles the former exceptionally well, far better than it handles the latter.

Heroes of the Storm Review: Easy to get into and fun to play

Blizzard defines Heroes of the Storm as a “hero brawler.” But really, it’s a MOBA—an idiosyncratic and sparsely populated genre that mixes together bits and pieces of real-time strategy and fighting games in fiercely competitive matches. The game pits two teams of fantastical creatures against each other to see who can destroy the other’s base first.

Memory Lane: The best-looking video game consoles of all time

Silly fanboys. All these years arguing over things you thought were important, like specs, and games, and controllers. Not once have you considered the most crucial thing about a video game console: how good it looks. Over the past four decades, there have been some plain consoles, sometimes even some ugly consoles, but we don’t care about them today. Today, we celebrate the best-looking video game consoles (no handhelds) of all time.

Mortal Kombat X Review: Bringing fresh blood to the classic franchise

This is a next-generation Mortal Kombat in more ways than one. It features new characters, some of whom are the sons and daughters of classic Kombatants like Johnny Cage and Jax Briggs. More gore, but also more emotional plot points. You get the sense that Netherrealm is trying to infuse fresh blood into their franchise while simultaneously courting acclaim from the world of hyper-competent pro-competition players. Mostly, the ambition pays off.

Game blogger turned game developer: Five things I didn't get about making video games

Before I joined Gearbox Software, I worked at Destructoid as a features editor, highlighting indie games and spewing vitriol at big-budget games I didn't like. I played their games, I found them wanting, and I felt like I had a pretty good idea of where and why things had gone wrong. I may not have ever made a game myself but I basically knew what game development was about, right? Wrong. It turns out there were a shitload of things I didn't know about.

Homeworld Remastered: The return of a game that's almost perfect

Games are forever changing. If you played a shooter from 1999 and then a shooter from 2015, you'd notice the differences immediately, not just in how they looked but how they played, how smartly they were designed. Homeworld was released in 1999. Play its remastered edition in 2015, though, and you'd be forgiven for thinking it was a brand new video game. Almost everything about it — and I'm not talking about its new visuals — feels fresh.

Always talking, never listening: Why Peter Molyneux's Godus is such a disaster

Game designer Peter Molyneux has long had a reputation for making promises he never quite delivered on. He has again been accused of misleading statements, in relation to Godus, his Kickstarter god game revival. In an attempt to get to the bottom of it all, we spoke both to Molyneux and to three people who have worked with him over the past few years. This is the story of how Godus ended up where it is today.

Football reviewed: The sport from a gamer's perspective

Football reviewed: The sport from a gamer's perspective

If Football—that is, the American National Football League football—used the same naming scheme as "Dungeons & Dragons," we'd call it "Beer Commercials & Cheerleaders." Like dungeons and dragons, beer commercials and cheerleaders are two things that not everyone likes. They are also, however, not The Point of their respective games.

Roundup: 12 Favorite PC Games

PC gamers have got a pretty great thing going. Interesting, experimental indie games? Yup. The shiniest, most visually impressive versions of big-budget games? Yeah, they get a lot of those, too. Let's say you've recently joined the ranks of the PC elite. What games should you install? Well, you can start out with the games listed on this roundup.

Dragon Age: Inquisition Review: Epic in scope, carefully crafted down to the smallest moment

Dragon Age: Inquisition is a role-playing game from BioWare, the third in the Dragon Age series. Being a fantasy game it has dragons, and elves, and magic. But it is also a fantasy in another, more special way. Inquisition ushers us into a vast world and sets that world revolving around us, patiently waiting on our every action. It has time for us. Finally, the world will be what we want it to be. Finally, we'll have the time to get everything right.

Far Cry 4 Review: A great sequel, if not a true next act for the series

Staying true to tradition, Far Cry 4 takes place in an expansive world that's seductively beautiful. Kyrat is located somewhere in the Himalayas, and this mountainous region adds an incredible amount of density to the game. And depth. So what if it feels a lot like Far Cry 3? That's one of the best shooters I've ever played. But it was also flawed enough to warrant a revision, and more often than not, Far Cry 4 is able to surpass its predecessor.

Origin Chronos Z review: A mean, compact gaming PC

Origin Chronos Z review: A mean, compact gaming PC

The Origin PC Chronos Z is the meanest small form factor gaming PC I've yet to encounter. Origin PC ships its gaming systems in wooden crates. The Chronos Z came in the smallest crate to date, yet the Titan Z-powered beast within was more powerful than anything that came before it.

Sony PlayStation TV Review: Part micro-console, part media streamer, plenty of compromises

The PlayStation TV is a small black box that connects to a television set via HDMI cable. Inside of that box are the guts of a PlayStation Vita handheld gaming system, and as such it can play PlayStation Vita games. It can also play PSP games, PS One classics, stream PS4 and PlayStation Now games, and stream TV shows and movies.

Alien: Isolation Review: An intense horror game and heartfelt tribute

While many a video game has been designed for people who enjoy killing aliens, Alien: Isolation can only have been created for people who derive some perverse pleasure out of being killed by an alien. Regardless of how it happens, rest assured that the alien will kill you. The game is rarely less than terrifying, the Sevastopol is splendidly awful, and the straightforward story pays homage to the film without going overboard.