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History of the Personal Computer, Part 4: The mighty Wintel empire

Intel's existence traced back to the breakup of Shockley Electronics and Fairchild Semiconductor. Determined to avoid the same fate, lawsuits became object lessons to employees, a means of protecting its IP, and a method of tying up a competitor's financial resources. This is the fourth installment in a five part series, where we look at the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips.

History of the Personal Computer, Part 3: IBM PC Model 5150 and the attack of the clones

IBM's stature guaranteed the PC to initiate a level of standardization required for a technology to attain widespread usage. That same stature also ensured competitors would have unfettered access to the technical specifications of the Model 5150. This is the third installment in a five part series, where we look at the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

History of the Personal Computer: Leading up to Intel's 4004, the first commercial microprocessor

The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the first in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

Intel Core i7-5960X Haswell-E Review: No expense spared performance

Intel's Extreme Edition processor line is over a decade old now, starting way back in 2003 with the single-core Pentium 4 EE 3.4GHz. Fast forward to today, the chip we'll be looking at boasts eight cores, a massive 20MB smart cache, support for the latest DDR4 memory, and is accompanied by the new X99 chipset for more SATA 6Gb/s ports (10 rather than just two) and finally brings native USB 3.0 to Intel's flagship platform.

Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition Review: Back to its Legendary Overclocking Roots

For more than a decade tech-savvy users on a budget would commonly buy a sub-$100 CPU and achieve performance comparable to $200-$300 chips by overclocking. These days Intel locks down its lower end parts, but to mark the 20th anniversary of its Pentium brand, they've released a fully unlocked dual-core Pentium G3258 for $72 -- just what the overclocking community has been waiting for. We'll put it through its paces in a couple of builds of our own.

Intel rebrands their Broadwell Y line as Core M

Intel rebrands their Broadwell Y line as Core M

During Intel’s Computex 2014 keynote, the company announced a ‘new’ line of CPUs designed for low-power tablets and similar mobile devices. The new line, called Core M, isn’t unfamiliar to those keeping up with Intel’s roadmap: it essentially refers to…