Amazon is dropping "Just Walk Out" technology from its grocery stores in favor of Dash Carts

midian182

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What just happened? It appears that Amazon's dream of a totally checkout-less store is over. The company has decided to phase out its Just Walk Out technology that allows customers to grab items and leave Amazon grocery stores. All affected outlets will instead switch to Dash Carts, which Amazon says is the better technology.

Amazon's senior vice president of grocery stores said the company is moving away from Just Walk Out technology and "sprucing up the stores across the board," reports The Information.

... it actually relied on more than 1,000 workers in India to monitor accuracy and label videos, essentially acting as outsourced cashiers.

The system uses cameras and sensors to track what people leave with, charging the cost to the payment method they used to enter the store. While Amazon talked about the technology being cashierless, it actually relied on more than 1,000 workers in India to monitor accuracy and label videos, essentially acting as outsourced cashiers.

The Information writes that 700 out of 1,000 Just Walk Out sales required human reviewers as of 2022, missing Amazon's goal of 50 reviews per 1,000 sales, though the company disputes these figures.

For all the hype, Just Walk Out has proved too slow for customers and too expensive for companies to implement. The overseas cashiers reportedly took a long time to send back data, meaning customers wouldn't receive their receipts until hours after leaving the store. There have also been questions raised over Amazon collecting and sharing data on customers' shopping habits.

Just over half of all Amazon Fresh stores use Just Walk Out tech. The systems will be phased out in favor of Dash Carts, which involves scanning a QR code to start a session, scanning products as they're added to the cart or using the touchscreen for lookups, then exiting through the Dash Cart lane or checking out at a register. The system is basically a self-checkout machine strapped to a cart with a few added extras, and while it's not perfect, it's certainly more accurate and cheaper than the alternative.

The decision doesn't spell the end of Just Walk Out technology, at least not yet. Amazon is reportedly keeping the system in a small number of Fresh stores in the United Kingdom, and in some Amazon Go stores. It will also remain in place at the many ballparks, theme parks, convenience stores, hospitals, and other locations in US, UK, Australia, and Canada that use the technology.

In a statement on the matter, an Amazon spokesperson said:

We've invested a lot of time redesigning a number of our Amazon Fresh stores over the last year, offering a better overall shopping experience with more value, convenience, and selection – and so far we've seen positive results, with higher customer shopping satisfaction scores and increased purchasing. We've also heard from customers that while they enjoyed the benefit of skipping the checkout line with Just Walk Out, they also wanted the ability to easily find nearby products and deals, view their receipt as they shop, and know how much money they saved while shopping throughout the store. To deliver even more convenience to our customers, we're rolling out Amazon Dash Cart, our smart-shopping carts, which allows customers all these benefits including skipping the checkout line.

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I've seen the future, and the future is an Ai building full of thousands of Indian dudes.

How long until we find the chatGPT building. Wait did Gemini outsource to Pakistan by accident instead of india and THATS why it sucks so bad?
 
I got to a small grocer that has an amazing butcher section and everything I need to make a good meal pretty much every day on my way home from work.

The roof leaks sometimes when it rains. It is fun interacting with the guys behind the counter asking about what crazy marinade or sausage filling they came up with or the people at checkout asking about dinner plans and making small talk.

Same people work there for years at a time, it's not some revolving door.

The idea of shopping at an Amazon grocery with it's needlessly "this is the future, 0 human interaction" vibe is a no go for me.
 
I got to a small grocer that has an amazing butcher section and everything I need to make a good meal pretty much every day on my way home from work.

The roof leaks sometimes when it rains. It is fun interacting with the guys behind the counter asking about what crazy marinade or sausage filling they came up with or the people at checkout asking about dinner plans and making small talk.

Same people work there for years at a time, it's not some revolving door.

The idea of shopping at an Amazon grocery with it's needlessly "this is the future, 0 human interaction" vibe is a no go for me.
I appreciate the human interaction and the ability to get special service. However, for most people, a trip to the grocery store is a hassle. I was in a small local store the other day. A nice, older lady, cashier chatted my ear off when I only wanted to buy 3 items and get back home. She was nice and friendly, but this was a case of "I should have used self-checkout".

Grab and go, or just walk out, is convenient at times. We have used the Amazon store at our local sports stadium. It really beats standing in line waiting for a slow cashier to check out some dude with 12 beers, popcorn, hotdog and peanuts. The only thing you have to do is pop open any beers before leaving. Otherwise, grab what you want and walk out and get back to the game.
 
It's not like grocery stores aren't already doing this, right? They have your "loyalty" card/phone no and every time you give it to the cashier, they can track everything you bought.

- And here I thought I was getting $0.20 off a gallon of gas out of the niceness of their hearts...
 
"they also wanted the ability to easily find nearby products and deals, view their receipt as they shop, and know how much money they saved while shopping throughout the store"

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It's not like grocery stores aren't already doing this, right? They have your "loyalty" card/phone no and every time you give it to the cashier, they can track everything you bought.
That is why I don't shop at those grocery stores.
 
That is why I don't shop at those grocery stores.
You must grow your own then. Most every store is keeping some data on what you purchased. It may not be possible to tell specifically what you bought, but they all have some sort of inventory management system tracking everything sold from the store. They likely know days and times at which certain items sell best. I imagine beer, for example, sells well on sports weekends or hot summer days.
 
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