AMD Zen 5 'Granite Ridge' CPUs enter mass production, will arrive in late 2024

DragonSlayer101

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What just happened? AMD has already revealed that its next-gen Ryzen CPUs featuring Zen 5 cores will launch in 2024, confirming that the new chips will use the AM5 socket and be compatible with existing 600-series motherboards. A new report has now seemingly revealed that the upcoming processors have entered mass production, and are on track to be released later this year.

The news comes from well-known tipster @Kepler_L2, who claimed that AMD has already started mass-producing its next-gen CPU lineup, codenamed "Granite Ridge." The new chips will feature Zen 5 cores as an upgrade over the Zen 4 and Zen 4c cores found in the company's existing processors. Some reports indicate that they could be announced as early as April 2024, while others suggest that the launch could be delayed to Q4.

AMD first announced Zen 5 back in 2022, promising faster performance and lower power consumption compared to Zen 4. The new architecture is also expected to offer a 20-30 percent IPC gain over Zen 4, which could translate to a whopping 15-20 percent improvement in single-threaded performance in select applications, including some games. This could make it an attractive option for gamers looking to upgrade from their older AMD rigs.

Not much is known about Zen 5, but rumors suggest that it will use a hybrid architecture with a mixture of standard and dense "C" cores. The mainstream Zen 5 processors are said to offer between six and sixteen cores, and come with a Ryzen AI NPU like Hawk Point. However, all that's still speculation, as AMD is yet to confirm Zen 5 specs.

The Granite Ridge processors could be marketed under the Ryzen 9000 branding and offer integrated AI and machine learning optimizations. They are expected to compete with Intel's Arrow Lake-S desktop CPUs that are also said to be released later this year.

However, before Zen 5 can make an appearance, AMD will launch the Ryzen 8000G "Hawk Point" APUs. These will arrive later this month with Zen 4 CPU cores and RDNA 3 iGPUs, and will be compatible with existing AM5 motherboards. The lineup is expected to initially include at least four SKUs, including the Ryzen 7 8700G, Ryzen 5 8600G, Ryzen 5 8500G, and Ryzen 3 8300G.

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Zen is just so good. Jim Keller knows his stuff. Once every decade he pulls a miracle and single-handedly pushes the global CPU industry to new heights lol.

It's not like he did design the whole thing on it's own. First generation ryzen was OK but not beating intel. But it did at least fired up competition again after a few bad CPU releases since the Bulldozer.

Since then they have bin refining node after node (First Ryzen had 4 cores per chiplet) and now we're looking at almost 16 per chiplet). I think Ryzen's best interest would be increasing it's single core IPC.

I have to say; I had 10 years a bunch of webservers based on Intel XEON's and am replacing it with a Epyc based system. The performance is 2.5x better now and you'll get so much more cores back.
 
Zen is just so good. Jim Keller knows his stuff. Once every decade he pulls a miracle and single-handedly pushes the global CPU industry to new heights lol.

As we now know, Keller had big participation with Zen1 and did very little on Zen2. Basically nothing on Zen3 and everything after that.

Also Zen1 was very rushed one and had big influence from Bulldozer and Jaguar, to save time of course.

Source: Mike Clark, Zen architecture lead designer.
 
As we now know, Keller had big participation with Zen1 and did very little on Zen2. Basically nothing on Zen3 and everything after that.

Also Zen1 was very rushed one and had big influence from Bulldozer and Jaguar, to save time of course.

Source: Mike Clark, Zen architecture lead designer.
Amusing to hear him say that Zen 1 was rushed. It was delayed and delayed forever! It came out several years after the previous architecture but it offered the biggest single leap in single threaded performance (over the outgoing piledriver architecture) that I have seen in a generational improvement. It bought it right up to Intels current at the time Skylake IPC and failed to beat it at gaming, mostly due to high latency from the dual CCX design and games not really benefitting from more than 2-4 cores at the time.
 
Amusing to hear him say that Zen 1 was rushed. It was delayed and delayed forever! It came out several years after the previous architecture but it offered the biggest single leap in single threaded performance (over the outgoing piledriver architecture) that I have seen in a generational improvement. It bought it right up to Intels current at the time Skylake IPC and failed to beat it at gaming, mostly due to high latency from the dual CCX design and games not really benefitting from more than 2-4 cores at the time.
Zen1 was not delayed but developed very quickly.

Zen1 development started August 2012. Came out March 2017. That is, 4.5 years. Very short time for totally new architecture. Usually that is at least 5 years. That is because branch predictor was largely from Bulldozer/Jaguar and AVX unit from Excavator.

After Piledriver also came Steamroller and Excavator, both were based on Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture. There was also supposed to be "fixed Bulldozer" after Excavator but it was cancelled because Zen1 took all resources.

Anyway Zen1 was very rushed one. For comparison, Zen2 was largely based on Zen1 and still took 4 years to reach market (development start mid 2015, launch mid 2019).
 
It makes Intel's tick tock seem so quaint.
The fact that this Zen5 CPU will lead onto a Zen5 platform is significant as well . Once this is embedded in . Then Zen 5 will add the upgrades - new DDR modes etc. But you will still get a big boost on Zen4
 
Zen1 was not delayed but developed very quickly.

Zen1 development started August 2012. Came out March 2017. That is, 4.5 years. Very short time for totally new architecture. Usually that is at least 5 years. That is because branch predictor was largely from Bulldozer/Jaguar and AVX unit from Excavator.

After Piledriver also came Steamroller and Excavator, both were based on Bulldozer/Piledriver architecture. There was also supposed to be "fixed Bulldozer" after Excavator but it was cancelled because Zen1 took all resources.

Anyway Zen1 was very rushed one. For comparison, Zen2 was largely based on Zen1 and still took 4 years to reach market (development start mid 2015, launch mid 2019).
Here is an article where AMD is delaying it to the end of 2016 and we know the CPU ended up launching in 2017, so it had been delayed at least twice. That is a delay in comparison to when AMD announced they were going to launch Zen. The development time may be normal or rushed, but the launch itself was definitely delayed.

And from a buyers perspective it appears very delayed. the FX8350 (and co) launched in late 2012 meaning AMD effectively sold the same part for almost 5 years. There was a refreshed FX8370 and the infamous 9000 series. And their lacklustre budget APU lineup. But if you wanted a performance part it was the same piledriver CPU architecture on sale for 5 whole years.

Certainly nobody has ever said "Wow AMD got those Zen based CPUs out on the marketplace quickly". If they were rushing internally, it only really goes to show how much of a calamity AMD CPUs were back in those days. This appears to have stopped now. But I am personally a bit upset that as soon as AMD became competitive, they abandoned reasonable pricing. I guess that's just good business from the management's perspective.

https://www.decryptedtech.com/amd-is-delaying-the-launch-of-zen-until-the-end-of-2016
 
Late 2024, are you guys smoking crack. It will be released H1. Maybe you are thinking X3D versions. Leave the comedy to the pros.
 
"which could translate to a whopping 15-20 percent improvement in single-threaded performance in select applications, including some games"

What was the realized improvements from Zen 3 to 4? 15-20% sounds like artificial hype to me.
 
Here is an article where AMD is delaying it to the end of 2016 and we know the CPU ended up launching in 2017, so it had been delayed at least twice. That is a delay in comparison to when AMD announced they were going to launch Zen. The development time may be normal or rushed, but the launch itself was definitely delayed.

And from a buyers perspective it appears very delayed. the FX8350 (and co) launched in late 2012 meaning AMD effectively sold the same part for almost 5 years. There was a refreshed FX8370 and the infamous 9000 series. And their lacklustre budget APU lineup. But if you wanted a performance part it was the same piledriver CPU architecture on sale for 5 whole years.

Certainly nobody has ever said "Wow AMD got those Zen based CPUs out on the marketplace quickly". If they were rushing internally, it only really goes to show how much of a calamity AMD CPUs were back in those days. This appears to have stopped now. But I am personally a bit upset that as soon as AMD became competitive, they abandoned reasonable pricing. I guess that's just good business from the management's perspective.

https://www.decryptedtech.com/amd-is-delaying-the-launch-of-zen-until-the-end-of-2016

New architecture mostly from scratch, new process node, new platform, new BIOS/AGESA, new memory... in 4 years. Was never going to happen. AMD just needed more hype, they were in big trouble and had to keep investors happy, even with promises quite impossible to hold.

Piledriver was around for 5 years yes but that is because Zen development started after Piledriver launch and other Bulldozer variants never made to AM3+. Mostly because Zen took all resources.

Everyone was amazed how quickly Zen got into market. 5 years is usually minimum for totally new architecture, anything under that is fast. That 5 year minimum also is best case scenario. Beating that is pretty amazing. Again, Zen2 took 4 years. Largely Zen1 based, platform same, BIOS/AGESA mostly same, memory same etc, much much easier.

As for reasonable pricing, We must remember AMD lost GlobalFoundries 7nm process totally. That caused supply issues. And I don't consider CPU like Ryzen 9 7950X3D that expensive considering what you get. Heck, back in days FX-55 was thousand bucks CPU. For that price you got (against 500 bucks one) few hundred MHz clock speed. Current top Ryzens really offer something for money, unlike top CPUs years ago.
 
The 8000G desktop APUs are really just laptop chips that are allowed to use more power. There are 8000-series laptop chips that match each of the four 8000G series -- same number of CPU, GPU, and NPU cores, just higher base clocks. And the 8000 series for laptops is nearly identical to the 7000 series, only the NPU core count has increased.

All in all, the Ryzen 8000 series is a yawner. The 9000 series, when we will first see Zen 5 cores (assuming that's the branding that AMD chooses), is another matter.
 
"which could translate to a whopping 15-20 percent improvement in single-threaded performance in select applications, including some games"

What was the realized improvements from Zen 3 to 4? 15-20% sounds like artificial hype to me.

I'm not someone who follows cpu development, but 15-20% sounds low to me. Why would anyone bother to upgrade for that?
 
I'm not someone who follows cpu development, but 15-20% sounds low to me. Why would anyone bother to upgrade for that?
20-30% IPC gain is a lot. Very lot. For comparison, on Intel side we were usually are talking about single digits. For example going from Haswell (2013) against Skylake (2015), it was around 5% more IPC (that is "average" and that really depends on what software is used). Not to say Intel stick with Skylake from 2015 to 2021, that is, around 0% IPC improvement for 6 years.

As for upgrade, well, it's probably not worth to upgrade from Zen4 to Zen5. But what if you have Zen3, Zen2 or even Zen1? Bigger the improvement from Zen4, more sense it makes to upgrade.

In other words, I have Zen4 and won't consider Zen5 upgrade. But IF Zen5 really brings 20-30% IPC uplift and IF Zen6 brings around 10-20% IPC uplift against Zen5 AND if Zen6 fits into AM5, THEN I may consider Zen6 upgrade.
 
"AMD Zen 5 'Granite Ridge' CPUs enter mass production, will arrive in late 2024"

In other news, winter is colder than summer.
 
It's not like he did design the whole thing on it's own. First generation ryzen was OK but not beating intel. But it did at least fired up competition again after a few bad CPU releases since the Bulldozer.

Since then they have bin refining node after node (First Ryzen had 4 cores per chiplet) and now we're looking at almost 16 per chiplet). I think Ryzen's best interest would be increasing it's single core IPC.

I have to say; I had 10 years a bunch of webservers based on Intel XEON's and am replacing it with a Epyc based system. The performance is 2.5x better now and you'll get so much more cores back.
I believe Zen 5 will be AMD's first design to finally go beyond 4-wide decoders, so should bring a decent boost to IPC
 
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