AMD's Ryzen 9 "Threadripper" CPU lineup leaks, capped by 16-core / 32-thread monster

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

Intel, rumored to be prepping new enthusiast-grade Core i9 processors for reveal at Computex next month, apparently won’t be the only chipmaker with new silicon debuting in June. Longtime rival AMD is hard at work on a new line of CPUs that’ll bring its Zen architecture to the high-end desktop market and thanks to a new leak, we’ve got the skinny on the entire Ryzen 9 “Threadripper” lineup.

Starting at the bottom and working our way up, we have the Ryzen 9 1955 and 1955X. These are 10-core (20-thread) chips with base / boost clocks of 3.1GHz / 3.7GHz and 3.6GHz / 4.0GHz, respectively, with TDPs of 125W.

Climbing one step up the ladder, you’ll find the Ryzen 9 1956 and 1956X. These 12-core (24-thread) processors offer respective base / boost clocks of 3.0GHz / 3.7GHz and 3.2GHz / 3.8GHz with the same 125 watt power ratings.

Name Cores/
Threads
Base clock/
Boost (GHz)
PCIe Lanes Memory TDP

1998X

16/32 3.5 / 3.9 44 Quad Channel DDR4 155W

1998

16/32 3.2 / 3.6 44 Quad Channel DDR4 155W

1977X

14/28 3.5 / 4.0 44 Quad Channel DDR4 140W

1977

14/28 3.2 / 3.7 44 Quad Channel DDR4 140W

1976X

14/28 3.6 / 4.1 44 Quad Channel DDR4 140W

1956X

12/24 3.2 / 3.8 44 Quad Channel DDR4 125W

1956

12/24 3.0 / 3.7 44 Quad Channel DDR4 125W

1955X

10/20 3.6 / 4.0 44 Quad Channel DDR4 125W

1955

10/20 3.1 / 3.7 44 Quad Channel DDR4 125W

One step further forward is the 1976X, the 1977 and the 1977X. This tier offers 14 cores with 28 threads and base / boost clock speeds of 3.6GHz / 4.1GHz, 3.2GHz / 3.7GHz and 3.5GHz / 4.0GHz, respectively. The 1976X and 1977 carry TDPs of 140W while the 1977X is slightly higher at 155W.

The crowning jewel of AMD’s upcoming enthusiast lineup is the Ryzen 9 1998 and 1998X, 16-core (32-thread) monsters with a base / boost clock of 3.2GHz / 3.6GHz and 3.5GHz / 3.9GHz, respectively. Both of these chips have 155W TDPs, as you might have guessed.

All chips support quad-channel DDR4 and offer up 44 PCIe lanes. They’ll fit into a modified version of the SP3 socket (originally designed for AMD’s 32-core Naples server parts) called the SP3r2. The new platform is codenamed Whitehaven.

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Lionvibez

TS Evangelist
The 1955X looks like it may be my next upgrade.

Going from my current 6 core chip to 10 cores will be a big enough boost I think.
 

avioza

TS Maniac
Wow AMD is out for blood. This is awesome, even though I don't think I would ever need 16 cores lol.
 

psycros

TS Evangelist
Why did both companies skip over 6 and 8 in their product naming schemes? Some mutual hope that their competition would use a purely linear progression so each could try and fool consumers into thinking higher = better?
 

Puiu

TS Evangelist
Why did both companies skip over 6 and 8 in their product naming schemes? Some mutual hope that their competition would use a purely linear progression so each could try and fool consumers into thinking higher = better?
AMD is just matching Intel's naming scheme to make it easier for a consumer understand the performance/price bracket their CPUs fall into. As for why intel chose these numbers... I have no idea. I also found it weird since they could have just used the number of cores or threads
 

soulsassassin

TS Addict
And what is a good price? It'll probably be 900 MSRP and 1000 for the X version.

Why do you need 32 threads. You have used 4 threads for years. You can't be doing much CPU intensive tasks if i5 has been good so far..
I was thinking the same thing if the 2500k has been sufficient for the past few years a jump to a 1700 would be better suited
 

TheBigT42

TS Maniac
My last AMD CPU was a 486 DX4 120. I ran circles around the Pentium 100. It looks like my next build might be a AMD again!
 

LNCPapa

TS Special Forces
I really need some prices - and right now I'm very happy that I haven't had the funds to build my Ryzen build just yet. Depending on the price difference between the 1956X and the 1976X, one of those might be what I'm saving for next. Super excited - can't wait to see all the numbers! I also hope they adopt the name Threadripper for consumer marketing - it sounds very intimidating.
 

Vrmithrax

TechSpot Paladin
Why did both companies skip over 6 and 8 in their product naming schemes? Some mutual hope that their competition would use a purely linear progression so each could try and fool consumers into thinking higher = better?
Maybe they both have a weird OCD thing and can only use prime numbers?
 

Tim K

TS Rookie
Looking at the product numbers and specs for the supposed 14 core parts, something doesn't make sense. The specs and numbers seem all out of order.
 

Tim K

TS Rookie
Additionally, what is described in the prose doesn't match the table. At a guess, the 1976X doesn't actually exist and was just a typo at some point in the leak.
 

dirtyferret

TS Evangelist
Still clinging to my i5-2500k @ 4ghz. AMD 1500 & 1600 look interesting but I've yet to see any real world benchmark that makes me feel like I need to upgrade.
 
R

Raoul Duke

Love the name, (....going into store, see sales person) what would you like, Kaby Lake or Threadripper?
 
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Nero7

TS Evangelist
Typical AMD move of just going overboard with something.
I might just replace my 2500K for a 1998 if the price is good.
And what is a good price? It'll probably be 900 MSRP and 1000 for the X version.

Why do you need 32 threads. You have used 4 threads for years. You can't be doing much CPU intensive tasks if i5 has been good so far..
This.

Its a typical AMD move to just go overboard with something that is effectively useless for most. Same with the 8GB versions of their cards.

As if there's a point in having 10+ cores at 3.0GHz when a quad core at 4.0GHz destroys them.
 
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