Apple says to keep your iPhone 12 away from pacemakers

midian182

Posts: 6,643   +59
Staff member
TL;DR: You might love your iPhone 12, but if you’re fitted with a medical device, be careful that it doesn’t break your heart. Apple is emphasizing that its latest flagship and MagSafe accessories should be kept a safe distance from pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), and other implants that might respond to magnets and radios.

MacRumors reports that while Apple has long acknowledged its new handsets and accessories may cause electromagnetic interference with medical devices, it is now offering more information on the potential dangers.

In an updated support document, Apple writes that the iPhone 12 series should be kept six inches from the medical devices in question and more than twelve inches if wirelessly charging. A separate entry explains that the potential risks extend to accessories such as the MagSafe Charger and MagSafe Duo Charger.

“All MagSafe accessories (each sold separately) also contain magnets—and MagSafe Charger and MagSafe Duo Charger contain radios. These magnets and electromagnetic fields might interfere with medical devices,” the company writes.

Apple claims that although the iPhone 12 does contain more magnets than previous models, they are not expected to pose a greater risk of magnetic interference than those older handsets.

Despite Apple’s insistence that its newest flagship is no more threatening to implanted medical devices than previous iPhones, a recent study reported by the Hearth Rhythm Journal found that a Medtronic pacemaker could be disabled if in proximity to an iPhone 12.

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Squid Surprise

Posts: 3,911   +2,980
Irresponsible reporting.... any Qi charging device should be kept away from a pacemaker.... no mention that this applies to other smartphones too?

Nah... let’s just get the Apple haters out...
 

Chemicalfacist

Posts: 36   +26
Irresponsible reporting.... any Qi charging device should be kept away from a pacemaker.... no mention that this applies to other smartphones too?

Nah... let’s just get the Apple haters out...
This is an article specifically about an update that Apple recently published about their own devices. Yes, the author could have pulled sources about other devices, but this is literally about one thing not the other.
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
Irresponsible reporting.... any Qi charging device should be kept away from a pacemaker.... no mention that this applies to other smartphones too?

Nah... let’s just get the Apple haters out...
Irresponsible reading.... they aren't talking about the charging portion (that you don't carry around with you), but the iPhone itself because of the magsafe magnets in the phone.

Also, Apple documentation on launch insisted that it was safe, and they were getting called out for it. So yeah, unless you have examples of similar situations (where the company backtracks), you're the one (ironically) looking like a fanboy.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 3,911   +2,980
This is an article specifically about an update that Apple recently published about their own devices. Yes, the author could have pulled sources about other devices, but this is literally about one thing not the other.
The article SHOULD mention that other smartphones with magnets are just as "unsafe"... it doesn't....
Irresponsible reading.... they aren't talking about the charging portion (that you don't carry around with you), but the iPhone itself because of the magsafe magnets in the phone.

Also, Apple documentation on launch insisted that it was safe, and they were getting called out for it. So yeah, unless you have examples of similar situations (where the company backtracks), you're the one (ironically) looking like a fanboy.

Even the article states that other Apple devices (before MagSafe) were also "unsafe".... the article is clearly biased... but hey, got to love it...
By the way... "Wireless charging has been around since the late 19th century, when electricity pioneer Nikola Tesla demonstrated magnetic resonant coupling – the ability to transmit electricity through the air by creating a magnetic field between two circuits, a transmitter and a receiver. "

Note "magnetic field".... that's how Qi charging works...
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,001   +6,775
I'm not an Apple lover, but this looks like simply click bait. Any product must pass stringent rules and tests before licensed to be distributed in the USA and giving a simple warning would NOT release Apple from liability. They would have to recall ALL affected products and fix/replace them. What are the origins of this so called story???
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
Even the article states that other Apple devices (before MagSafe) were also "unsafe".... the article is clearly biased... but hey, got to love it...
By the way... "Wireless charging has been around since the late 19th century, when electricity pioneer Nikola Tesla demonstrated magnetic resonant coupling – the ability to transmit electricity through the air by creating a magnetic field between two circuits, a transmitter and a receiver. "

Note "magnetic field".... that's how Qi charging works...
Where's the whole "the phone needs to have a magnetic field/magnets" requirement of Qi charging? All I'm seeing is that the separate charger (the transmitter that plugs into the wall) creates the field. Not the coil in the phone (the receiver).

And then this is Apple backtracking after saying it was safe, so why would your deflection about Qi charging phones (which don't require magnets in the phone) potentially discredit this article about an iPhone that 100% has magnets in it?
 
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Squid Surprise

Posts: 3,911   +2,980
Where's the whole "the phone needs to have a magnetic field/magnets" requirement of Qi charging? All I'm seeing is that the separate charger (the transmitter that plugs into the wall) creates the field. Not the coil in the phone (the receiver).

And then this is Apple backtracking after saying it was safe, so why would your deflection about Qi charging phones (which don't require magnets in the phone) potentially discredit this article about an iPhone that 100% has magnets in it?
Wireless charging works by using magnetic fields... so naturally, anything that wirelessly charges will have one (both the charger AND the receiver)... it's pretty weak - even being 6" away is probably safe - but thanks to lawsuits, Apple says "don't do it"... I don't think there's actually been a documented case of someone's pacemaker failing due to an iPhone 12 - please correct me if I'm wrong...
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
Wireless charging works by using magnetic fields... so naturally, anything that wirelessly charges will have one... it's pretty weak - even being 6" away is probably safe - but thanks to lawsuits, Apple says "don't do it"... I don't think there's actually been a documented case of someone's pacemaker failing due to an iPhone 12 - please correct me if I'm wrong...
When powered, the transmitter (copper coil) generates a magnetic field for the receiver (copper coil). Without power, neither are magnetic (wouldn't even pick up a paperclip).
If you were to take that copper coil out of the iPhone 12, it wouldn't be able to charge but would still be a hazard to ICD's because it has an array of rare earth magnets still inside (allows magsafe to latch in place).

Do you understand why Qi isn't the same issue seen here yet? Why confuse people further by insinuating that all wireless charging is hazardous (when it's clearly an array of magnets in the phone, not coil)?
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 3,911   +2,980
When powered, the transmitter (copper coil) generates a magnetic field for the receiver (copper coil). Without power, neither are magnetic (wouldn't even pick up a paperclip).
If you were to take that copper coil out of the iPhone 12, it wouldn't be able to charge but would still be a hazard to ICD's because it has an array of rare earth magnets still inside (allows magsafe to latch in place).

Do you understand why Qi isn't the same issue seen here yet? Why confuse people further by insinuating that all wireless charging is hazardous (when it's clearly an array of magnets in the phone, not coil)?
Apple admitted that previous iPhones were also "unsafe"... which means it has nothing to do with the magnets from MagSafe.... it's the Qi charging.... which, as long as the phone is powered on, will be enabled... as will any other Qi charging phone that is powered on...

Anyways, my original point still stands... the poster of this article knows that there are numerous "apple haters" on this site and has posted this as clickbait... a well-written article would at least MENTION that it applies to other smartphones...
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
Apple admitted that previous iPhones were also "unsafe"... which means it has nothing to do with the magnets from MagSafe.... it's the Qi charging.... which, as long as the phone is powered on, will be enabled... as will any other Qi charging phone that is powered on...
Taking Apple's word on a negative about their product? Have you not learned what PR speak is?

You're either just being disingenuous or a fanboy who can't see past your love of Apple.
There has literally already been a separate study showing that it's only a problem with the iPhone 12 (mentioned in this article), despite what Apple has said (to make themselves look better).

Here, he goes over it:
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
Anyways, my original point still stands... the poster of this article knows that there are numerous "apple haters" on this site and has posted this as clickbait... a well-written article would at least MENTION that it applies to other smartphones...
No, it doesn't.
Which other phones have a magnetic array that they should mention? Because I can't find or think of any.
And as I've already stated, a copper coil does not equal a hazard when not charging (as who charges their phone 6 inches from their medical device?).
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 3,911   +2,980
No, it doesn't.
Which other phones have a magnetic array that they should mention? Because I can't find or think of any.
And as I've already stated, a copper coil does not equal a hazard when not charging (as who charges their phone 6 inches from their medical device?).
As long as the phone is on, it will be emitting a weak magnetic field.... as will any other smartphone that has Qi charging.... I don’t think this is that difficult to comprehend...
 

defaultluser

Posts: 118   +84
Irresponsible reporting.... any Qi charging device should be kept away from a pacemaker.... no mention that this applies to other smartphones too?

Nah... let’s just get the Apple haters out...

When you're the first company to whip-out the " hey, let's ,make this the only charging option for all future models" candy, then you really need to get smacked-down with warning articles like these.

https://www.businessinsider.com/apple-iphone-13-rumor-wireless-no-lightning-charging-port-2019-12

I knew that once Apple could find a way to get their Magsafe tentacles back into their products (except wireless now), they were in it to win it, regardless of your medical condition.

What's even more amazing is that the target for all these new iWatches are...wait for it..older people with all of thee issues/ or medical device in their bedrooms...and they force you to pair it with an iPhone with no charging cord :D
 
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m4a4

Posts: 2,278   +2,458
TechSpot Elite
As long as the phone is on, it will be emitting a weak magnetic field.... as will any other smartphone that has Qi charging.... I don’t think this is that difficult to comprehend...
No, it is not the same as a magnet array. It won't even pick up a paperclip unless the coil in the phone has power (and it would be a waste to have the receiver powered for normal use). I literally just tested that with an android with wireless charging. Stop repeating your baseless assumption as it is easily proven wrong.

Seriously, stop holding onto your Apple bias for one second and use logic. The receiver coil in a phone does not create a magnetic field as described in the above hazard. It is not the reason why the iPhone 12 is a hazard.
 
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Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,102   +1,232
TechSpot Elite
If these devices are dangerous for people with pacemakers, they should have never been allowed to be sold in the first place. That's like walking around with some Plutonium-239 in your pocket. Sooner or later, it's going to kill someone.