Backblaze data shows SSDs have lower failure rates than HDDs

captaincranky

Posts: 19,352   +8,486
Still new to Linux and it's a HP Notebook with an AMD APU. I'm thinking Linux Mint. Any suggestions?
Well, I just installed Mint on a relic, (Intel G-41 Pent E6300 4 GB DDR-800 Q4/09), after going through a mountain of sh!t trying to bump the rig to 8 GB of RAM & Win7 Pro 64 bit. This was Win 7 32 bit. The Chinese off brand RAM I gambled on was bad. In the meantime, the cheapie ($25.00 PNY 250 GB) SSD failed also, after going through pretty much the same machinations as you. (It refused to format. Who know's, maybe it was bad all along).

Going from 250 GB to 500 GB SSDs doubles the TBW life expectancy (200 to 400 or thereabouts).

M$ activation procedures for Win 7, ("user phone home") is a PITA, nor will they give you SP-1. Instead they give you the "cumulative security update", which effectively bricks any, or all, Chrome based browsers. For example, Opera was blowing up warnings about "bad certificates", when trying to navigate to Walmart and Wikipedia? How rude. Firefox ignores it, but it's more resource hungry than Opera, my browser of choice.

More to the point, I've never been able to tolerate Ubuntu, So, I installed Mint "Cinnamon". The only real aggravation with any Linux distro that I've tried, is that it requires a password upon resume, (But not at boot). I live alone, so no need for that much security. As you may have guessed, "1234", does the trick.

Even more to the point, Mint salvaged a machine that I was starting to think had a bad board / bricked BIOS, or both. It's (I believe), the closest Linux distro to Windows available.

The bad, no "show desktop button", or task manager from the task bar. (There is a task manager of sorts, but you have to dig into "settings" to access it). Programs have to be installed by command line. However, for programs they have in their repository, "sudo apt install >name< does the trick, and even my aging brain can remember that.

Installing Mint is actually easier than installing Windows, and once I got rid of the bad SSD and RAM, it was easy to get the video set for my portrait oriented monitor. (Silly me didn't pull the video card on the first try, the system read it as the IGP, and there was hell to pay for that blunder).

Depending on your basic installed programs, they may not be available ported to Linux. Opera and VLC are ported to Linux, while CCleaner is not. It becomes a little more complicated at that point, searching for replacements, especially with programs that are not available or outdated in the repository. Command line then once again, rears it's ugly head.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Danny101

Posts: 2,033   +842
Well, I just installed Mint on a relic, (Intel G-41 Pent E6300 4 GB DDR-800 Q4/09), after going through a mountain of sh!t trying to bump the rig to 8 GB of RAM & Win7 Pro 64 bit. This was Win 7 32 bit. The Chinese off brand RAM I gambled on was bad. In the meantime, the cheapie ($25.00 PNY 250 GB) SSD failed also, after going through pretty much the same machinations as you. (It refused to format. Who know's, maybe it was bad all along).

Going from 250 GB to 500 GB SSDs doubles the TBW life expectancy (200 to 400 or thereabouts).

M$ activation procedures for Win 7, ("user phone home") is a PITA, nor will they give you SP-1. Instead they give you the "cumulative security update", which effectively bricks any, or all, Chrome based browsers. For example, Opera was blowing up warnings about "bad certificates", when trying to navigate to Walmart and Wikipedia? How rude. Firefox ignores it, but it's more resource hungry than Opera, my browser of choice.

More to the point, I've never been able to tolerate Ubuntu, So, I installed Mint "Cinnamon". The only real aggravation with any Linux distro that I've tried, is that it requires a password upon resume, (But not at boot). I live alone, so no need for that much security. As you may have guessed, "1234", does the trick.

Even more to the point, Mint salvaged a machine that I was starting to think had a bad board / bricked BIOS, or both. It's (I believe), the closest Linux distro to Windows available.

The bad, no "show desktop button", or task manager from the task bar. (There is a task manager of sorts, but you have to dig into "settings" to access it). Programs have to be installed by command line. However, for programs they have in their repository, "sudo apt install >name< does the trick, and even my aging brain can remember that.

Installing Mint is actually easier than installing Windows, and once I got rid of the bad SSD and RAM, it was easy to get the video set for my portrait oriented monitor. (Silly me didn't pull the video card on the first try, the system read it as the IGP, and there was hell to pay for that blunder).

Depending on your basic installed programs, they may not be available ported to Linux. Opera and VLC are ported to Linux, while CCleaner is not. It becomes a little more complicated at that point, searching for replacements, especially with programs that are not available or outdated in the repository. Command line then once again, rears it's ugly head.

Hope this helps.
Thank you.