China jails University of Minnesota student over tweets mocking President Xi Jinping

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

Axios reports that 20-year-old freshman Luo Daiqing was arrested in July last year when he returned to his hometown of Wuhan for the summer break. According to court documents seen by the publication, he was sentenced to six months in prison in November for using "his Twitter account to post more than 40 comments denigrating a national leader's image and indecent pictures," which "created a negative social impact." The tweets were posted in September and October 2018, while he was studying at the University of Minnesota.

Axios found a now-deleted Twitter account belonging to Luo. It included Chinese government slogans posted over images of Lawrence Limburger, a name that may be familiar to fans of 1990s cartoon Biker Mice From Mars. The main villain from the show bears a resemblance to Xi. There were also retweets of Winnie the Pooh—a character that’s banned in China over comparisons to the president.

Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska has called on China to release the student. "This is what ruthless and paranoid totalitarianism looks like," he said.

Last year, it was reported that China’s government is detaining, interrogating, and threatening its citizens for posting anything considered inappropriate on Twitter. One user, activist Huang Chengcheng, was chained to a chair and questioned for eight hours. Once his ordeal was over, he had to sign a promise to stay off Twitter. While the platform is one of many western websites blocked by China’s Great Firewall, some residents use VPNs to circumvent the ban.

Update: According to The Star Tribune, Daiqing has now been released to his hometown of Wuhan, the city at the heart of the coronavirus outbreak no less.

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QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Luo was arrested when he returned to China.

If you know you reside in a place that will punish you for going abroad and "doing something"... don't do it.
 
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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
The term "ugly American" came from so many Americans expecting other countries to rise to their personal expectations rather than accept and obey the countries laws and customs. We live in a time where being outspoken is considered a expectation rather than simply rude behavior. As Chief Justice Roberts put it so eloquently, civility is always the better path .....
 
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kombu

TS Maniac
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Li was arrested when he returned to China.
When you do go back, make sure to try the bat soup.
 
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Reactions: picka

Porkous

TS Member
I usually search around for clues to find out the intention/motive and sentiment of the source of that specific paper.
It troubles me, and I hope in the next hundreds of years these types of regimes don't stir trouble in the future of mankind. I read somewhere that some of their rulers been in the business for decades. What kind of victory is that where there is no adversary and competition? Where is the strength to face adversity?
Anyway, I hope they don't treat their neighbors as they would treat their brothers.

We would not have this discussion if we were in their place. It's interesting, but probably not so dramatic. Now I am interested more on the matter...
In an AI case scenario, what would happen if China conquered the world? Damn son.
 

wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
I am sure they think they are maintaining order, but, IMO, all they are doing is stifling their citizens. In that kind of environment, no one can reach their true potential.
 

Adi6293

TS Guru
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Li was arrested when he returned to China.
I dont follow, are you saying that what they did to him was right?
 
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Reactions: Vanderkaum037

Danny101

TS Evangelist
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Li was arrested when he returned to China.

If you know you reside in a place that will punish you for going abroad and "doing something"... don't do it.
Not because it's the right thing to do. It's just self preservation.
 
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Reactions: Plutoisaplanet

Eldritch

TS Maniac
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Luo was arrested when he returned to China.

If you know you reside in a place that will punish you for going abroad and "doing something"... don't do it.
Damn, you were supposed to lick the boot, not eat it!
 

Lionvibez

TS Evangelist
"When in Rome do as the Romans do".

I'm an American citizen.

I lived in shanghai China whilst a student in Fu Dan University.

Before I got my visa, I was told under no circumstances: to bring illegal drugs, to practice Fa Lun Gong or to criticize the Chinese government.

I obeyed the rules.

I made it back with no issues.

I would go back again.



Unlike America, most Asian/ East Asian countries do not have a bill of rights, or support the 1st amendment (or many of the others either). But, I typically never fear for my life from Chinese/Asian police or their government - not in the way I do here in America. Most of them don't even have guns to be able to shoot me claiming they thought my cellphone, wallet or 3 Muskateers bar was a "weapon".

Here in America, we've got people and even sitting congressmen trying to make a case for murdering American citizens on foreign soil who are "paling around with terrorists".

When I go to Thailand annually I know not to talk bad about the royal family.
When I go to Philippines annually, I know not to criticize Duterte.

If you aren't going to obey the rules...stay home.

Now - in this case, Luo was arrested when he returned to China.

If you know you reside in a place that will punish you for going abroad and "doing something"... don't do it.
Yup kid is a Chinese national he should have known better.

Now no soup for you for 6 months lesson learned the hard way.
 
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Evernessince

地獄らしい人間動物園
The term "ugly American" came from so many Americans expecting other countries to rise to their personal expectations rather than accept and obey the countries laws and customs. We live in a time where being outspoken is considered a expectation rather than simply rude behavior. As Chief Justice Roberts put it so eloquently, civility is always the better path .....
The argument that civility is always the better path is much like practicing ultimate pacifism. It only works if the other party cares. Otherwise there is nothing stopping them taking it by force or other dubious means.

Human nature tends to be to take what we want.
 
Last edited:
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