Commodore 64 Mini to launch next year with 64 pre-loaded games

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

Nintendo is clearly on to something with its miniature console remakes. Now on its second iteration and as popular as ever, Nintendo’s tiny replicas are inspiring a whole new breed of retro consoles and I, for one, couldn’t be happier.

The latest, a micro version of the best-selling ‘80s home computer, comes courtesy of Retro Games. The Commodore 64 Mini connects to your television via HDMI and comes bundled with a joystick. You also get 64 pre-loaded games including classics like Chip’s Challenge, California Games and Impossible Mission.

The plug-and-play machine features two USB ports for connecting a second joystick or even a standard USB keyboard. After all, the system at its heart is a home computer. Should you want to brush up on your BASIC programming skills, well, have at it.

As PC Gamer highlights, Retro Games is the same outfit that launched an Indiegogo campaign last year to bring back a full-sized Commodore 64. That project raised around $100,000, or 67 percent of its flexible funding goal, but has yet to deliver to backers.

In a recent project update, the company said it’s clear that the retail market is demanding the mini version over its full-sized design. Prioritizing the mini version will give them the capital to deliver to backers and pre-order customers, the firm notes.

As an added benefit, those that backed the original Indiegogo console effort or pre-ordered a system from their site will also receive the Mini version.

The Commodore 64 Mini is scheduled to launch in early 2018 for $69.99.

Permalink to story.

 

amghwk

TS Guru
Current surge of "classic" consoles/old games remakes, etc, just shows the dearth and lack of originality and innovation of current generation games.

Current game development community talents are funneled into remakes - likened to painting old cars.

Even those excited about new games have to realize they are sequels of sequels.

Publishers control the developers to produce copycat games. And zombie players simply buy them.

May the future of gaming be saved.
 

Skidmarksdeluxe

TS Evangelist
"Nintendo’s tiny replicas are inspiring a whole new breed of retro consoles and I, for one, couldn’t be happier".
And I, for one, couldn't care any less. I've owned the original Commode 64, Sinclair Spectrum ZX, the SNES, the Mattel Intellivision game console, the Apple IIe (both of which I still own) and the IBM Intel 8086, and I see no point in going back.
The one thing I would love to go back on and have back is the very 1st car I ever owned, a GENUINE, PROPER Sir Alec Issigonis designed, British racing green, 1275 cc Mini Cooper S. Now that's a proper blast from the past and real nostalgia for me. Not some overpriced, BMW based thing that loosely mimics the shape of the original that we see today. An original Mini in good condition such as the one I described and owned will easily fetch 3x more than a brand new Mini despite it's far more advanced engineering and overall superiority.
 

techseven

TS Enthusiast
I love this idea but it looks like the included games are totally obscure titles (crappy?), I don't remember any of them except some Monty game but on Sinclair Spectrum...
 

ET3D

TechSpot Paladin
I love this idea but it looks like the included games are totally obscure titles (crappy?), I don't remember any of them except some Monty game but on Sinclair Spectrum...
I do remember California Games and Impossible Mission ("Another visitor! Stay a while; stay forever!"). But yeah, the game list isn't that great.

Edit: Looks like Uridium is there, and Trailblazer, so that already covers quite a bit of what I'd like to see. :)

I like this better than the Nintendo consoles, because I never owned a Nintendo. Didn't own a C64 either, but I did own a VIC 20 and C128. If the keyboard is really usable and is a full emulation including the original Basic, then I might consider buying it. But considering that the site suggests plugging in a USB keyboard, I imagine that's not the case. Oh, well.
 
Last edited: