Corsair launches quad channel memory kits for Intel LGA-2011

Shawn Knight

Posts: 12,999   +130
Staff member
Corsair has announced multiple quad channel DDR3 memory kits designed for use on Intel’s new Sandy Bridge-E platform. 32nm, socket LGA-2011 processors feature an upgraded integrated memory controller with four…

Read the whole story
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 12,661   +6,033
I wonder if their kits come with two memory coolers.

From what I've seen it will be common for the LGA2011 motherboard to have modules on two sides of the CPU. This would mean you need a cooler for both sides (that is if you opt to using them).
 

Wendig0

Posts: 1,156   +146
They have apparently changed the 32gb quad channel kit for $261.35, to a 16GB kit for the same price.
 

igotdembombs

Posts: 19   +1
I don't get the cas latency. Someone please explain it to me. 10-12-10-27? Isn't 9-9-9-27 cas latency better? Isn't the lower the better?
 

Mister_K

Posts: 2,042   +728
igotdembombs said:
I don't get the cas latency. Someone please explain it to me. 10-12-10-27? Isn't 9-9-9-27 cas latency better? Isn't the lower the better?

The lower the better.
 
G

Guest

Lower does not always mean better ;))
(you need to look at the frequency too)
 

dividebyzero

Posts: 4,840   +1,270
I don't get the cas latency. Someone please explain it to me. 10-12-10-27? Isn't 9-9-9-27 cas latency better? Isn't the lower the better?
CAS10 for DDR3-2400 isn't at all shabby. Latency (timings) typically becomes more relaxed as the module density and number of modules increases.

An example would be these G.Skill kits- note that the higher the density and frequency (16GB, 32GB, 64GB) the looser the timings become in general. Finding 4 or 8 modules designed to run at higher bandwidth at tight timings becomes quite a task for the binning process, so relaxing out the timings allows for a commercial quantity of the RAM to be made available.
(And -1 for G.Skill's marketing. RipjawsX for Z68 and RipjawsZ for X79 :rolleyes: )
 

fpsgamerJR62

Posts: 489   +0
In the case of the new X79 boards, does one really need to buy a quad channel DDR3 kit like these Corsair kits or will a pair of dual channel kits do just as well ?
 

dividebyzero

Posts: 4,840   +1,270
So is my Corsair Dominator GT 1600Mhz 7-8-7-20 good? got 4 sticks, each with 2GB on.
Those timings for your 12800MB/sec kit are about as good as it gets.
In the case of the new X79 boards, does one really need to buy a quad channel DDR3 kit like these Corsair kits or will a pair of dual channel kits do just as well ?
In general two dual module kits work fine...there are however a couple of things to take into consideration;
- Corsair don't make their own memory IC's, they source them from various makers (Elpida, Hynix, Micron, Nanya, ProMOS etc...), and each of these IC makers gets a different version for each kit that Corsair has - so a Dominator/Vengeance 2 x 2GB DDR3-1600C9 kit for example could be v2.1 or v5.1. Even though the packaging and spec is the same, sometimes different vendor modules aren't stable alongside eachother- so it's best to source the same version if you're using 2 or more different kits.

- Buying two tight timing kits may mean that you can't reach those timings in practice once you use them together- a lot depends on the quality of the modules, the nature of the board and it's power regulation, and of course the memory controller on the CPU.

In reality, and some discerning shopping there isn't too much difference in pricing between 2 dual kits and 1 quad kit
Corsair 4 x 4GB Vengeance DDR3-1866C9 ( should tighten up to C8 at the lower 1600 bandwidth) @ $160
Corsair 2 x 4GB Vengeance DDR3-1600C8 @ $75 ( or $150 for 2 kits)