Employees don't want to return to the office... but bosses do. Job satisfaction 62% higher...

zakislam

Posts: 52   +1
Why it matters: Hybrid work models are increasingly becoming the new norm as companies examine work culture moving forward. As firms welcome back employees to offices after the pandemic forced them to work remotely, a large proportion of the workforce prefers if the status quo remains. Conversely, bosses are ready to return.

A study from Future Forum finds that executives are nearly three times more likely than regular employees to want to return to the office on a full-time basis. The survey is derived from 10,000 knowledge workers in the U.S., Australia, France, Germany, Japan, and the U.K.

A whopping 76 percent of employees do not want to return to the office for full-time work. Sixty-eight percent of execs wish the opposite, saying they would rather work from offices rather than home most or all of the time. Fifty-nine percent of bosses say they will require employees to come back to the office for most or all of the workweek.

Moreover, 66 percent of executives are structuring their companies’ post-pandemic workforce policies with little to no employee input. “The great executive-employee disconnect” report examines how the preference for bosses to return to the office is threatening both employee satisfaction and retention. The poll reveals that job satisfaction among execs is 62 percent higher than non-executive workers.

Two-thirds of executives (66 percent) believe they’re “very transparent” in terms of their post-pandemic policies, but only 42 percent of the workforce agrees. This divide could ultimately result in talent leaving for opportunities elsewhere. Fifty-seven percent of knowledge workers revealed they were open to looking for a new job in the next year. Future Forum gathered the survey data from July 28 to August 10, 2021.

“The view of the office looks different from the top,” said Brian Elliott, Executive Leader of the Future Forum. “While executives are banging down the door to get back to their corner offices, non-executive employees are demanding flexibility in where and when they work. Companies must do more to bridge this gap in order to attract and retain top talent.”

Among those currently working remotely, 44 percent of executives want to work from the office daily—a stark contrast to the 83 percent of employees who would like to continue their roles from home. Additionally, 75 percent of executives currently working remotely want to return to the office at least three to five days a week, while just 34 percent of employees share that same desire.

Another interesting finding from the report is that 76 percent of workers want flexibility in where they work, and 93 percent want flexibility in when they work. These figures would undoubtedly be affected by hybrid work models currently used by businesses.

Google, for example, will migrate to a model where its workforce spends around three days in the office and two remotely. Only 20 percent of employees for the search giant will work from home permanently. With the purchase of a new $2.1 billion office building, it did stress, however, that workers “need to collaborate” for them to be “really happy and productive.” Apple also said it expects most of its workforce to come in for three days for work.

There could be some negatives attached to working from home, though. A study focused on Microsoft employees claims that remote working may jeopardize productivity and innovation. Lending credence to that view is a survey detailing how 40 percent of remote workers spend four or more hours away from their PCs. At least 21.3 percent focus on work for between 1 to 3 hours and 60 percent have taken a nap on company time.

Still, Microsoft's thinking aligns with its rival: most of its workforce can work from home for less than 50 percent of the week, and it now even considers work schedule flexibility "standard" for most roles.

Permalink to story.

 

Dimitriid

Posts: 1,297   +2,540
Correction: *BAD* bosses are ready to return, mostly because they're not good at managing people without the petty bs of micromanaging and the office politics.

Good bosses like the fact that almost all remote employees have consistently shown their productivity goes *up* directly because the lack of commute and the additional expenses that incurs while still being able to get their jobs done just fine.
 

Hexic

Posts: 1,079   +1,627
TechSpot Elite
Over half of my group stated they would seriously consider leaving the company if returning to work in-office from home was re-instated 3-5 days a week.

And like clockwork, the hard policy was walked back the next day and an on-site “conversational symposium” was thrown on the calendar for later this month for our division to ‘talk new policies over’.

Yeah, you watch the good talent leave your workforce when you as well as them know damn well they can do better, more efficient work from home. Plenty of other companies are hiring remote positions.

The old school mentality of “always on-site” will die off, just like the dinosaurs.
 

Eldritch

Posts: 356   +576
The reason in addition to the obvious power trip, is actually quite simple, accountability.

When a direction is given to employees, several middle level managers do it in personal meetings. This creates a lot of legroom for them to backtrack when things go wrong and just blame the employee instead.
When things are online, there exists record of every single conversation and suddenly the accountability falls on their shoulder, which they absolutely hate.
 

kapital98

Posts: 382   +339
Correction: *BAD* bosses are ready to return, mostly because they're not good at managing people without the petty bs of micromanaging and the office politics.

Good bosses like the fact that almost all remote employees have consistently shown their productivity goes *up* directly because the lack of commute and the additional expenses that incurs while still being able to get their jobs done just fine.

Bad managers think office productivity is just time spent doing something. They completely ignore the "productivity" part of the output. And, quite frankly, fear any change to what they already know.

Bad Managers + Risk Aversion = Really Bad Decisions.

^Good managers can put in place productive work flows that actually help talent focus on their tasks and not get bogged down with busy work (like endless emails, pointless meetings, etc).
 

yRaz

Posts: 3,889   +4,128
Let's keep wages low, show people that they don't need to be in the office, offer other people more money and then demand everyone be back in the office after several months of "Noone needs to be here."

I'm so happy I quit the IT industry and basically Anything office work.
 

Toju Mikie

Posts: 238   +215
This is a HUGE issue with some lower-wage jobs that can easily be done remotely. It makes no sense, especially when they are trying to recruit workers that will work for these wages (typically younger workers). It costs extra time and extra money to travel to and from the workplace, buy food instead of cooking at home, etc.

Many managers and higher-ups, and C-level execs just fail to see this and wonder why people don't want to work for their company.
The solution is simply to PAY EMPLOYEES MORE MONEY
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,731   +1,787
TechSpot Elite
I doubt that. They were likely saving themselves from your harassment. I'd likely agree with you too just to shut you up.
It's important to remember that this isn't one of your worm farms. A unanimous decision was made to require vaccines for staff to return to the office. Anyone that didn't want the vaccine could still work from home. I made the announcement, and we have been fully staffed in person since.

Then I'd drive off and never speak to you again.
Well, then It's good to know that you are capable of giving the people what they want.
 

NicktheWVAHick

Posts: 330   +521
Good. Stay at home forever. Become a social isolate unable to interact with other humans face to face. I’m hoping for a trifecta here….everyone works from home, energy prices go thru the roof, and new car inventories stay abysmally low. My commute will be so much more tolerable then.
 

Trapped Nowhere

Posts: 96   +79
Good. Stay at home forever. Become a social isolate unable to interact with other humans face to face. I’m hoping for a trifecta here….everyone works from home, energy prices go thru the roof, and new car inventories stay abysmally low. My commute will be so much more tolerable then.
you're not supposed to tell the wish. now it's definitely not going to happen 😂
 

nodfor

Posts: 117   +203
I can help with that Cliff. I have a staff of 26, and a support staff of 6.
As we all easily agreed last Spring, not one of them is even allowed to park in our parking lot if they aren't vaccinated.
How did u get such solid results? Did you screen out everyone who isn't a hypochondriac during the hiring process?
 

gamerk2

Posts: 626   +538
Over half of my group stated they would seriously consider leaving the company if returning to work in-office from home was re-instated 3-5 days a week.

And like clockwork, the hard policy was walked back the next day and an on-site “conversational symposium” was thrown on the calendar for later this month for our division to ‘talk new policies over’.

Yeah, you watch the good talent leave your workforce when you as well as them know damn well they can do better, more efficient work from home. Plenty of other companies are hiring remote positions.

The old school mentality of “always on-site” will die off, just like the dinosaurs.

Yep, especially with all the open jobs right now, companies have zero leverage to work with.
 

mattferg

Posts: 194   +184
Correction: *BAD* bosses are ready to return, mostly because they're not good at managing people without the petty bs of micromanaging and the office politics.

Good bosses like the fact that almost all remote employees have consistently shown their productivity goes *up* directly because the lack of commute and the additional expenses that incurs while still being able to get their jobs done just fine.

Read the Microsoft study on this. You’re wrong - WFH has been shown to reduce productivity. The fact it’s still being used as an excuse for delays by the very same workers who claim it increases productivity shows they can’t be objective
 

RudyBob

Posts: 303   +294
Bosses aren't bad. Employees aren't good. Employee's aren't bad. Bosses aren't good. Go to work...get out of the house and stop crying all the time
 

Hexic

Posts: 1,079   +1,627
TechSpot Elite
Read the Microsoft study on this. You’re wrong - WFH has been shown to reduce productivity. The fact it’s still being used as an excuse for delays by the very same workers who claim it increases productivity shows they can’t be objective
Microsoft’s study did show that their own productivity appeared to decrease. But in true objectivity, this isn’t applicable to all companies or all job prospects. MS had many variables that is unique to their corporation that led to their result.

Effectively and strategically utilizing WFH nets increased productivity as a general concept. Based on your job description (and equally important assigned projects), this dictates your ability and effectiveness of being on-site or WFH.

If you are a developer, project manager, business analyst - most of the time you have no use being on-site. If you are a technician, direct business liaison, or an individual or who’s direct duties are relative to on-site activities - when it’s a waste for you to be WFH, and you would equally skew results in a study such as this.

Effective management is another key variable here. If someone / some people are not effectively working from home after a trial period - management has the responsibility to pull them back in office, because not everyone is built to work from home. I’ve had friends working from home for 10-15 years in sales, engineering, and project management; and they’ve moved up the ladder in their respective F500 companies.

It’s not a one-size-fits-all, and each study is independent of others in control groups, and can’t be assumed as ‘the norm’.
 

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,036   +863
I gave up the unhealthy and miserable office life a few years ago now. But if I were still in the rat race I’d be back in the office as soon as possible. I’m quite a social person, the idea of working from home remotely permanently is dreadful. I’d be a lot more productive in an office than at home personally.

Of course if your boss wants you back in then you go back in. Nobody has the right to work from home.
 
Bosses aren't bad. Employees aren't good. Employee's aren't bad. Bosses aren't good. Go to work...get out of the house and stop crying all the time

No one says managers are bad.

We are saying low quality manager managers insist on work from the office, and as a result will lose good employees to quality managers.

Low quality managers will end up with the less capable employees.

The result- poor performance for the manaher"s team, and low to zero bonus, or even dismissal of low quality manager.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 1,731   +1,787
TechSpot Elite
How did u get such solid results? Did you screen out everyone who isn't a hypochondriac during the hiring process?
Who can say? Common sense is an important part of any hiring process, so maybe I did that without realizing it.

I expected at least a few of my staffers to prefer to stay at home, but the entire process took less than an hour, and even most of that time was spent watching an NHL game recorded the night before. I think it was put well in the first paragraph of the @Sausagemeat post above.

Anyway. We had many distanced\masked meetings all through the pandemic, but simply getting the shot was an easy option.
 
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RudyBob

Posts: 303   +294
No one says managers are bad.

We are saying low quality manager managers insist on work from the office, and as a result will lose good employees to quality managers.

Low quality managers will end up with the less capable employees.

The result- poor performance for the manaher"s team, and low to zero bonus, or even dismissal of low quality manager.
And the next article will be about not being able to find employees because of....I am not buying the BAD manager routine. They are the boss. It is not as if they are bad officers getting people killed. Employees need to get over not having their *** kissed and a badge that reads "I'm Today's Special"
 

Rayneofpayne

Posts: 479   +408
Read the Microsoft study on this. You’re wrong - WFH has been shown to reduce productivity. The fact it’s still being used as an excuse for delays by the very same workers who claim it increases productivity shows they can’t be objective
Your kind of just as bad with the argument, out of all the companies 1 company has problems with their employees working remote so convention states in your rationality that is the case across the board.
Also I wouldn't just take a companies word on a study that can't even get their OS in a working order proper release without critical flaws, incompetence, teapot meet kettle.