FTTH (Fiber-To-The-Home) Network having huge Bufferbloats

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darKz

Posts: 14   +0
Alright, it's been 2 weeks since I've changed the fiber plans. I've had before 50Mbps now I've got 100Mbps Down/UP. I am occurring huge bufferbloats on the upload side of my superior fiber connection. I am an serious competitive player so this is an huge issue for me especially for sending my commands to the game server while in FPS games this matters a lot.

DSL Report:

 
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DelJo63

The DSL report says clearly
Currently the majority of people grade "C" or worse. This is because most equipment and software currently in use has bufferbloat issues.​
That means it's ALL on your equipment and some major investment would be necessary to improve your TCP and ISP connection. The upload speed is great so IMO you should just live with it -- Wish I had Fiber.
 

darKz

Posts: 14   +0
The DSL report says clearly
Currently the majority of people grade "C" or worse. This is because most equipment and software currently in use has bufferbloat issues.​
That means it's ALL on your equipment and some major investment would be necessary to improve your TCP and ISP connection. The upload speed is great so IMO you should just live with it -- Wish I had Fiber.

Currently the majority you claiming don't really have fiber connection my fella. Well this, ain't even my problem, I've paid for that "superior connection" and that "NANO FIBER TECHNOLOGY" that is supposed to be accurate to the perfection same as on stability and the quality of that connection. If that "NANO TECHNOLOGY FIBER CONNECTION" ain't able to fix those simple bufferbloats which I ain't even first and won't be last to occur them then it's as worthless as the coaxial cable standard one. The bufferbloats only buffers on the Upload side of the internet connection as usual no matter Google Fiber, AT&T or any other prestigious ISP that provides those "SUPERIOR FIBER INTERNET CONNECTION" the same bufferbloating will always happen on the upload side like they don't know how to cap it from brutal buffering. Which that issue could be easily considered as fatality for competitive gamers. I ain't gonna pay extra money to fix their own "superior fiber connection" network issues ma fella.
 
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DelJo63

I have no idea what you are attempting to say there. The issues are on your system/equipment and are up to you. Frankly, you are the first I have heard complaining on the so-called Bufferbloats and that goes back to 1993. I'm not a gamer and -- not subject to such fatalities so good luck with your gaming solution(s). Maybe some gamers can assist you with your Netherlands to Zuric issues
 

darKz

Posts: 14   +0
I have no idea what you are attempting to say there. The issues are on your system/equipment and are up to you. Frankly, you are the first I have heard complaining on the so-called Bufferbloats and that goes back to 1993. I'm not a gamer and -- not subject to such fatalities so good luck with your gaming solution(s). Maybe some gamers can assist you with your Netherlands to Zuric issues
I can clearly see, you literally have no idea what even bufferbloat is, let alone competitive gaming. But ain't blaming you anyways.
 

darKz

Posts: 14   +0
Anyone else who literally has experience and knows what he is talking about on bufferbloat in fiber optics?
 

mailpup

Posts: 7,678   +766
TS Special Forces
darKz, be nice. Everyone here gives help as unpaid volunteers. If someone can and wants to help you, they will.
 
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DelJo63

The WIKI comments:

When a router or switch is configured to use excessively large buffers, even very high-speed networks can become practically unusable for many interactive applications like voice over IP (VoIP), online gaming, and even ordinary web surfing.​
Some communications equipment manufacturers designed unnecessarily large buffers into some of their network products. In such equipment, bufferbloat occurs when a network link becomes congested, causing packets to become queued for long periods in these oversized buffers. In a first-in first-out queuing system, overly large buffers result in longer queues and higher latency, and do not improve network throughput.​
It's a common mistake to assume that large buffers imply better bandwidth. Smaller buffers avoid queueing and thus avoid jitter/queueing. In highly conjested networks, smaller buffers actually improve thruput.
 

darKz

Posts: 14   +0
darKz, be nice. Everyone here gives help as unpaid volunteers. If someone can and wants to help you, they will.
To those people whom genuinely want to share their knowledges and know what they are talking about. I get them huge respects for their honesty as my conscience and morale would never let me do otherwise. While for those whom tryna act smartass and fully confident onto something which they don't even have any clue or experience on and claim it as the truth, I get them none.

The standard theory those smartass acting fellas believe in thinking bufferbloat happens only when your network it's loaded up like downloading something huge or even uploading any video and even the worst, blaming those professional internet testing websites down to the tiniest accuracy out of their ignorance for being false on its testing way. But I'm here to destroy their meaningless theory about this buffers as once the issue of bufferbloating persists, that bufferbloat will always happen even on a simple browse no matter you reboot that fiber optic terminal "receiver" or anything else. Since my childhood I was let's say an high functioning tech connoisseur and never let something without understanding it fully as I mostly lean completely on my own experiences rather than different theories and thesis. Ain't even gonna say anything about my superior reaction times.

I've had before that 50Mbps plan that turned to be better caped than the 100Mbps one which obviously had to happen on the Upload side as it usually does in all those "SUPERIOR FIBER INTERNET" of those famous ISPs claim. The way all this NEW FIBER TECHNOLOGY still haven't yet fixed it, it's miserable and pity. And I can guarantee you that nobody with huge plan speeds can never fix that bufferbloating thing without paying huge extra money for those "bufferbloat stabilizers" aka switches that manage the internet connection.

DSL Reports:

50Mbps plan: http://www.dslreports.com/speedtest/67036008

100Mbps plan: http://www.dslreports.com/speedtest/67248962
 
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