HP collaborates with Valve and Microsoft on 'breakthrough' Reverb G2 VR headset

Polycount

Posts: 2,439   +549
Staff member

If you're a prospective VR customer, you may be pleased to hear that there are even more options available to you today. HP has just unveiled the Reverb G2, a 'breakthrough' VR headset that aims to offer some of the high-end features you'd see on a device like Valve's $999 Index at a much more accessible price point of $599.

For starters, you're getting dual 2160x2160p LCD displays, viewed through the same lenses used on the Index (contributed by Valve, of course). This should make VR games look better on the Reverb G2 than many of its competitors, though we'd need to test one for ourselves to confirm that. With that said, motion clarity on the G2 won't be quite as nice as it is on the Index: the former has been saddled with a standard 90Hz refresh rate, whereas the Index can be set to 144Hz.

Still, the G2 aims to make up for that drawback with full inside-out tracking (powered by four cameras), which eliminates the frustrating process of setting up external sensors. Inside-out tracking is not always as accurate as sensor-based tracking, but it is more convenient, while allowing for a more freeform play area.

Speaking of tracking, the Reverb G2 ships with two fairly standard VR controllers, packed with the usual array of joysticks, triggers, and buttons. However, they're still quite the improvement over the original Reverb's controllers, which weren't particularly comfortable or functional, according to many users.

The G2 headset features improved facemask cushioning compared to the previous Reverb, and more even weight distribution for amplified comfort during longer VR sessions. You can also adjust the horizontal distance between the device's lenses thanks to its built-in IPD slider.

Furthermore, as we've come to expect from most modern VR headsets, the facemask can be flipped up at a 90-degree angle if you need a brief glimpse of the real world (in case, say, your cat sprints between your legs).

One of the core improvements that the G2 boasts over its predecessor is its two built-in 10mm speakers that promise 3D "spatial audio." These speakers are using the same internal technology as the Index, so the audio experience should be quite similar across both headsets (despite their $400 price difference).

When the Reverb G2 launches later this Fall, it will support Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality platform, granting you access to VR experiences through both the Microsoft Store and SteamVR, depending on your preferences.

If you want to snag one of HP's latest headsets, pre-orders are available now through HP's website.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 2,870   +2,594
But they still have physical controllers?

I believe VR really needs to be standardized with gloves.

Great time for Nintendo to remake "The Power Glove (s)"
 

Evernessince

Posts: 5,081   +5,315
But they still have physical controllers?

I believe VR really needs to be standardized with gloves.

Great time for Nintendo to remake "The Power Glove (s)"
It uses Cameras for tracking so controller-less tracking should be an option at some point. The Oculus Rift S offers this feature.
 

Unilythe

Posts: 13   +39
But they still have physical controllers?

I believe VR really needs to be standardized with gloves.

Great time for Nintendo to remake "The Power Glove (s)"
Have you seen the controllers for the Valve Index? You strap them on and don't need to keep a hold on them. It can recognize when you grab something, pinch something, etc. It's pretty good.
 

Puiu

Posts: 3,903   +2,415
In the next year or so we'll see a ton of VR headsets be released on the market. It's going to be fun to see the prices of good headsets drop.
 

enemys

Posts: 210   +216
TechSpot Elite
It uses Cameras for tracking so controller-less tracking should be an option at some point. The Oculus Rift S offers this feature.
It does not, Oculus Quest does. It's not perfect and sometimes a bit sluggish, but quite usable. Rift S doesn't offer this option, though. Oculus Touch controllers, which come with it, offer basic gesture recognition, but that's neither per finger tracking like in Index controllers nor controller-less tracking offered by Quest.

As for the headset itself, I'll wait for reviews, but assuming it's as good as specs suggest, it'll probably be my next HMD.
 

Evernessince

Posts: 5,081   +5,315
It does not, Oculus Quest does. It's not perfect and sometimes a bit sluggish, but quite usable. Rift S doesn't offer this option, though. Oculus Touch controllers, which come with it, offer basic gesture recognition, but that's neither per finger tracking like in Index controllers nor controller-less tracking offered by Quest.

As for the headset itself, I'll wait for reviews, but assuming it's as good as specs suggest, it'll probably be my next HMD.
My point was that the HP reverb has a similar camera configuration and should be able to support it. Just like the Oculus S can support it (it even has 1 more camera then that Quest).
 

Ben1978

Posts: 30   +20
I don't see 90hz as a huge limitation because the processing power for a top game at 144hz must be prohibitive. The more basic controllers would be the biggest limitation for me compared to the Index; being able to actually throw something properly in VR must be pretty cool.
 
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Lounds

Posts: 437   +321
I'm saving up money for a decent VR headset, was gonna get occulus rift s but this sounds better than the stupid Valve index prices.
 

Puiu

Posts: 3,903   +2,415
I'm saving up money for a decent VR headset, was gonna get occulus rift s but this sounds better than the stupid Valve index prices.
Oculus Quest looks really good right now, but I need the money for something else more important. They improved the ability to use it with your PC a lot. To be able to carry it around and also use Oculus Link play PC games is something I wanted since the beginning of this modern VR push years ago :D

Maybe I'll wait for Quest 2, I'm not in a hurry.