Iran shuts down country's internet access amid fuel hike protests

Humza

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

In what is being linked to crippling US sanctions on Iran's economy, the latter was forced to roll out a fuel rationing scheme as well as drastically reduce existing subsidies on gasoline, resulting in a steep price hike of between 50 to 300 percent.

Being home to the world's fourth-largest crude oil reserves, petrol in Iran is still cheaper than most other countries. However, the average household income of the country has been deemed by many to be too low to comfortably put up with the new prices.

"The price of a gallon of regular gas jumped to 57,000 rials ($1.71) from 40,000 rials ($1.20) per gallon, while the monthly subsidized ration for each private car has been reduced from 70 gallons to 16 gallons, after which the price of gas rises to 114,000 rials ($3.42) per gallon," notes CNN.

It also doesn't help that the country's underdeveloped public transportation system means that most people have to rely on personal conveyance to go around, and with petrol suddenly getting a lot more expensive, the latter mode of transportation has become exceedingly restricted as well.

As a result, many cities, including Iran's capital Tehran, have been subject to mass demonstrations, where people were seen abandoning their vehicles on highways with protesters blocking the roads.

Over the weekend, the government, in its attempt to 'control' the protests and prevent the worsening situation from leaking to the outside world, shut down the country's internet access, as observed by NetBlocks, an organization that monitors cybersecurity and internet governance around the world.

The first major drops in connectivity were observed by NetBlocks on Friday afternoon with a near-total shutdown in the following days in what has been regarded as "the most severe recorded in Iran since President Rouhani came to power, and the most severe disconnection tracked by NetBlocks in any country in terms of its technical complexity and breadth."

The country's state television reports the President blaming opponents and foreign enemies for the unrest and that the recent price hike will prevent "fuel smugglers" from exporting Iran's oil to neighboring countries. Meanwhile the government's opposition and analysts point to other factors, including a weak economy, rising unemployment, corruption and stringent US sanctions as being responsible for the current situation.

Permalink to story.

 

Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
While the internet certainly makes it easier, it won't stop people from communicating with each other, especially over those issues that inflame the nation. Just look at the US history back before the Civil War and even as far back as before the revolution. People find ways to communicate; the angrier they are the more creative they are at spreading the word. Iran would be wise to start listening to their population and come to terms with changes that must be made ......
 
  • Like
Reactions: Underdog

candle_86

TS Booster
While the internet certainly makes it easier, it won't stop people from communicating with each other, especially over those issues that inflame the nation. Just look at the US history back before the Civil War and even as far back as before the revolution. People find ways to communicate; the angrier they are the more creative they are at spreading the word. Iran would be wise to start listening to their population and come to terms with changes that must be made ......
Like actual democracy
 

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
"The ongoing disruption constitutes a severe violation of the basic rights and liberties of Iranians"

Internet is a basic right and liberty? Wow. I thought food, clothing, and shelter were the basic rights.

I do agree that using the internet does not break the law depending how you use it. Blocking it from everyone is not right IMO. Breaking the law to show you are upset is not right though.
 

TomSEA

TechSpot Chancellor
"The ongoing disruption constitutes a severe violation of the basic rights and liberties of Iranians"

Internet is a basic right and liberty? Wow. I thought food, clothing, and shelter were the basic rights.

I do agree that using the internet does not break the law depending how you use it. Blocking it from everyone is not right IMO. Breaking the law to show you are upset is not right though.
I think we're getting to a point where internet access is a basic right and liberty. We're so connected these days, that to take that away would be considered a significant life hindrance.
 

candle_86

TS Booster
"The ongoing disruption constitutes a severe violation of the basic rights and liberties of Iranians"

Internet is a basic right and liberty? Wow. I thought food, clothing, and shelter were the basic rights.

I do agree that using the internet does not break the law depending how you use it. Blocking it from everyone is not right IMO. Breaking the law to show you are upset is not right though.
That's how every revolution starts, the American Patriots where terrorists as far as the British where concerned, revolution only happens peacefully in Canada
 

gamerk2

TS Evangelist
That's how every revolution starts, the American Patriots where terrorists as far as the British where concerned, revolution only happens peacefully in Canada
Pretty much exactly this; every freedom movement in history was lead by terrorists as far as the government in power was concerned.
 

rrwards

TS Addict
"The ongoing disruption constitutes a severe violation of the basic rights and liberties of Iranians"

Internet is a basic right and liberty? Wow. I thought food, clothing, and shelter were the basic rights.

I do agree that using the internet does not break the law depending how you use it. Blocking it from everyone is not right IMO. Breaking the law to show you are upset is not right though.
You're a bit behind the times. Back in 2011 the UN declared internet access to be a human right.
https://www.wired.com/2011/06/internet-a-human-right/
 

Impudicus

TS Addict
Sanctions seem like a great way to jump start a war. Someone is going to have to step in to bring order back to Iran.
 

Adorerai

TS Enthusiast
I saw that. But does basic right = human right? At the most basic, just what you need to live. So these people that live out in rural or desolate places without internet can't survive and their human rights are being broken. ;)
Agreed, if it has to be given to you, or done for you, it’s not a right. You don’t have the right to make a person or company do or give you anything.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShagnWagn

Lounds

TS Maniac
Like actual democracy
Yeah Iran did have Democracy but then the country decided to Nationlise oil, so the US/CIA made coup to over through the democratic elected party and put in a dictator (I believe to do with Iran's Royal family). Eventually the people got fed up of that dictator and put in what they have now. The reason Iran is a mess is fully down to the British and US.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Underdog

Underdog

TS Addict
Sanctions seem like a great way to jump start a war. Someone is going to have to step in to bring order back to Iran.
"Order" by whose definition? I'd say the problem in Iran is that the US has had Iran on its hit list for over a decade.
 

Latest posts