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ISPs forced to block Popcorn Time by court orders

By Greg S · 27 replies
Nov 13, 2017
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  1. Following a judgement from Norway's Oslo District Court, 14 different internet service providers have been ordered to block access to Popcorn Time and several of its variants.

    Popcorn Time is often known as the "Netflix for pirates", but this is a large success for Hollywood movie studios that have been attempting to fight against piracy. Gaining rapid popularity back in 2014 and going through a roller coaster of ups and downs following media attention, it ultimately faded from the limelight with the introduction of Kodi.

    Since no representatives from Popcorn Time showed up to court, it was concluded that the movie studios acting as plaintiffs are able to collect damages to cover legal fees. Each of the three Popcorn Time spinoffs owes $23,359 each, but it is highly unlikely that money will ever be paid.

    In addition to three domain names operated by Popcorn Time, third-party sites offering subtitles or other content have also been targeted and blocked. In total, 15 third-party sites related to Popcorn Time were also blocked including all of their sub-domains.

    One of the major implications of the order is that the court ruled a block does not infringe on "the Internet service providers' freedom to operate nor anyone else's right to freedom of expression". It may seem pretty clear cut that Popcorn Time was operating in a known gray area, but this sets a stronger precedent for restricting access to more sites in the future.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. amstech

    amstech IT Overlord Posts: 1,895   +1,057

    The court is trying to kill Sammael the Desolate One. Don't think they have seen Hellboy.
     
    Reehahs and TheBigT42 like this.
  3. NightAntilli

    NightAntilli TS Addict Posts: 165   +120

    Soon the internet will no longer be free...
     
  4. OutlawCecil

    OutlawCecil TS Maniac Posts: 234   +109

    Another win for big money. We have trillions, we're losing thousands.. what do we do?!
     
    Reehahs and ForgottenLegion like this.
  5. Theinsanegamer

    Theinsanegamer TS Evangelist Posts: 815   +828

    And apparently the courts dont know what a VPN is, which most users of such sites will be using.
     
  6. amstech

    amstech IT Overlord Posts: 1,895   +1,057

    I pay Spectrum $69.99 a month for 60 Mbps down, I wouldn't call that free.
     
    EClyde, Godel and TheBigT42 like this.
  7. Theinsanegamer

    Theinsanegamer TS Evangelist Posts: 815   +828

    Difference between free as in speech and free as in beer.

    Night is talking about the former, not the latter.
     
    NightAntilli and EClyde like this.
  8. Evernessince

    Evernessince TS Evangelist Posts: 1,919   +1,115

    Well, if VPN subscriptions weren't' already at a record high, they certainly are now. Heck at this point they are pretty much required whether you are pirating or not. I know for a fact that certain ISPs do monitor P2P traffic and send IP notices whether or not you are actually infringing on anyone's rights. Unless you are using a VPN, they can see all of your data.
     
  9. j05hh

    j05hh TS Booster Posts: 156   +34

    Spectrum now starts at 100 Mbps down and 10 Mbps up ( in WI )
     
  10. MaXtor

    MaXtor TS Booster Posts: 129   +28

    I pay for Amazon Prime Video, Netflix, CraveTV, Youtube Red, and Google Music, everything else I connect to my VPN and either torrent or stream from apps like ShowBox. Ending piracy is easy, make your media easily accessible worldwide for a reasonable price.
     
    Edito, Reehahs and OutlawCecil like this.
  11. EClyde

    EClyde TS Evangelist Posts: 1,200   +384

    I got new rabbit ears
     
    statikgeek likes this.
  12. Reehahs

    Reehahs TS Guru Posts: 523   +286

    That and stop trying to milk older titles. There is no reason for older movies to not be available for streaming for a nominal price of £1 or $1 each.
     
  13. Theinsanegamer

    Theinsanegamer TS Evangelist Posts: 815   +828

    Still 60/6 in Ohio. 100/10 would be fantastic.
     
  14. p51d007

    p51d007 TS Evangelist Posts: 1,258   +614

    I played around with popcorn time a few years back, but, wouldn't it be easy enough to use a VPN to get around it?
     
  15. Edito

    Edito TS Enthusiast Posts: 68   +9

    I live in Mozambique, Africa and I agree more than 120% with you, since Amazon and Netflix became available here I don't hear about exchanging movies, Torrents, people are investing in good connection to take advantage of those services because in the end none likes to pirate staff but sometimes we have to because there is no other way around... no movie/music/game store with the kind of content people are looking for, etc...
     
  16. SonicCrash

    SonicCrash TS Rookie

    What a waste of time they can only block streaming services if they can see them. Here is states people have started to move to VPN services.
     
  17. rculver9056

    rculver9056 TS Enthusiast Posts: 26   +7

    Thank the Lord for Hendricks & Belson! lol
     
  18. statikgeek

    statikgeek TS Rookie

    Spectrum starts at 20Mbps down and 3Mbps up here..........Maine and yea its still 75$
     
  19. centrino207

    centrino207 TS Enthusiast Posts: 91

    Yea but don't you need ISP to connect to VPN? So in reality the ISP can see traffic from your house to the VPN and back from VPN to your house.

    Well traffic from the VPN server to the target the ISP cannot see and control.
     
  20. Evernessince

    Evernessince TS Evangelist Posts: 1,919   +1,115

    Um, that's not how VPNs work. The traffic from your house to the server is encrypted. The only thing they will be able to see is your IP address and your VPN's server IP address, nothing else. The only way they could get around that is through a DNS leak or similar but any VPN worth there salt has protection against this specifically. What many ISPs will do is monitor known P2P ports and send out letters, whether or not you are actually doing anything illegal but one could easily employ a socks5 to anonymize the port as well.
     
  21. centrino207

    centrino207 TS Enthusiast Posts: 91



    So if it is encrypted that see any thing even the port.
     
  22. Evernessince

    Evernessince TS Evangelist Posts: 1,919   +1,115

    I think you misunderstood. Monitoring the known P2P ports still does not give them access to the contents of the packets. Regardless even without knowing the content of those package certain ISPs will send out letters simply based on you just using common P2P ports. They assume that you are doing bad things.

    Things like port, sender IP, and receiver IP are included in the packet's header and is visible to anyone regardless of encryption. Of course they are though, as they are need to route your packet to it's destination. The data of the packet is the part being encrypted. In addition, like I mentioned earlier, it's possible to obfuscate port and IP addresses. A VPN helps on the IP front while a Socket5 helps on the port front.
     
  23. centrino207

    centrino207 TS Enthusiast Posts: 91

    What are the pros and cons of free VPN vs paid VPN.

    Some VPN better than others.
     
  24. Evernessince

    Evernessince TS Evangelist Posts: 1,919   +1,115

    Indeed some VPN services are better than others. Here is the general rule of thumb when comparing VPN services

    Disadvantages of Free VPN
    - Slower than paid VPN services
    - Typically some restrictions like a bandwidth cap or ads to support the service
    - No guarantee that your data is being handled correctly by the free VPN
    - They may keep logs unless stated otherwise. (even the most popular free VPN Hotspot shield does)
    - Not many servers to pick from

    There really is no advantages of Free VPNs other than getting to keep your money. These free VPNs need to pay the bills somehow, whether that be through selling ads or selling your data.
     
  25. Evernessince

    Evernessince TS Evangelist Posts: 1,919   +1,115

    "Since no representatives from Popcorn Time showed up to court, it was concluded that the movie studios acting as plaintiffs are able to collect damages to cover legal fees. Each of the three Popcorn Time spinoffs owes $23,359 each, but it is highly unlikely that money will ever be paid."

    Ya know, I never really understood the mentality of this, where you are automatically guilty if you don't show up for court. It essentially favors large corporations, because they can have any number of people represent them while there is only one of you. That's about as fair as not being able to sue any individual in a company either, which is sadly also true.
     

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